Community Water Center

Community-driven water solutions through organizing, education, and advocacy

Kelsey Hinton

2017 Legislative Wins and looking forward!

SB 623 (Monning): Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund

As we have shared before, CWC’s top legislative priority is SB 623 which would create a new Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund to ensure all California communities and those on domestic wells can have access to safe drinking water. In partnership with Senator Monning and over 90 other organizations, CWC has worked hard in 2017 to move SB 623 through the Legislative Process. YOU played a critical role by attending lobbying days in Sacramento, passing resolutions of support through your local water board, making phone calls, and taking other forms of action. Thank you for making your voice heard.

While we have made great progress this year in moving SB 623 from the Senate into the Assembly, Senator Monning and stakeholders have decided to wait until next year to proceed with SB 623. This will allow for sufficient time to educate the legislative membership, and the public, to fully understand recent amendments made to the legislation and the importance of the policy to address the statewide problem of contaminated water in California.

We will continue building power and momentum over the coming months and will take up the fight again in January when the legislature reconvenes. Please stay tuned -- we will need you to remain engaged and taking action in order to push SB 623 over the finish line. Thank you!


AB 560 (Salas): State Water Board, funding assistance

CWC partnered with Assemblymember Salas from Bakersfield to pass AB 560, which broadens the guidelines for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) to allow larger systems whose service area qualifies as a severely disadvantaged community (SDAC) to apply for grant funding, if paying off a loan would result in unaffordable water rates. The bill also sets the affordability metric at 1.5% of the median household income. AB 560 improves the types of financial assistance that larger (but still small) communities like Arvin access through the DWSRF. This represents a modest improvement, but a far more important next step is to pass SB 623. We hope Assemblymember Salas will be a strong partner with CWC to fight for passage of SB 623 in 2018.


AB 1668 (Friedman): Drought and Water Supply Vulnerability

CWC worked with a coalition of water and environmental organizations to advocate for AB 1668, which includes a requirement that the Department of Water Resources (DWR) to develop recommended guidelines for county-level drought contingency planning for small water systems and rural communities. The bill also included a requirement that DWR use available data to identify small water suppliers and rural communities that may be at risk of drought and water shortage vulnerability, and then notify counties and local groundwater sustainability agencies of those suppliers or communities that may be at risk within its jurisdiction, and make the information publicly accessible on its Internet Web site. The legislative authors decided to make AB 1668 a two-year bill and continue working on the legislation next year. This gives CWC and other allies more time to educate decision makers and the public about the importance of proactive drought and water vulnerability planning.


2017-2018 State Budget: Emergency Drinking Water Needs

A coalition of environmental justice and other advocates that included CWC were successful in securing funding through the 2017-2018 state budget for emergency drinking water needs. This included $8 million for the State Water Board for emergency replacement of domestic wells and other emergency drinking water needs, $4 million for DWR for emergency needs, and $5 million for a CalFResh water benefit pilot.


published Andrea Ramirez in Our Team 2017-10-04 10:28:24 -0700

Andrea Ramirez

Organizing Intern

FullSizeRender.jpg

Andrea Ramirez joined the Community Water Center in Visalia as their organizing intern in September 2017. Her primary responsibilities include supporting staff with ongoing environmental justice organizing around drinking water issues in low-income communities and communities in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. Additionally, she is responsible for supporting communications work, database management, and contact entry.

Andrea was born and raised in Selma, CA. She is mainly interested in social and environmental justice and has also been a volunteer with the Boys and Girls Club in Clovis. She graduated with her AA-T in Sociology from Fresno City College in Spring of 2016, and transferred to Fresno State in the Fall of 2017. She is currently working on her B.A. in Sociology and is a Humanics Scholar.

Contact:

andrea.ramirez@communitywatercenter.org
Visalia Office, (559) 733-0219


published Charlotte Weiner in Our Team 2017-10-02 14:24:44 -0700

Charlotte Weiner

Fellow

CWC_Photo.jpg

Charlotte joined the CWC team as a fellow in the fall of 2017. She began her fellowship year in Visalia, where she engaged in community-facing advocacy and engagement work. In the spring, Charlotte will be based in the Sacramento office, where she will advance both quantitative and qualitative research and support media engagement on the senate bill (SB 623) which would ensure sustainable funding for safe, clean, and affordable drinking water solutions.

In the summer of 2016, Charlotte reported on water access in unincorporated communities in Tulare and Fresno counties with the support of Yale University summer journalism fellowships. Her senior thesis – on the intersection of wealth, water access, and place-based inequality in the Central Valley – won the George Hume Senior Essay Prize, awarded to the thesis in Ethics, Politics, and Economics that best investigates both the normative and empirical components of public issues.

Charlotte graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Yale University in 2017 with distinction in the Ethics, Politics, and Economics major. She was Executive Editor of Yale’s weekly newspaper, The Yale Herald, and co-captain of the Yale Women’s Club Soccer team. She also led pre-orientation hiking trips for freshmen in the Catskills and Vermont.

Charlotte’s fellowship year at Community Water Center is supported by the Gordon Grand Fellowship, awarded to a Yale University graduating senior whose “proven character and personal capacity to contribute to the lives of others” positions them for “leadership in the world of business or public affairs.”

Contact:

charlotte.weiner@communitywatercenter.org
Visalia Office, (559) 733-0219


published Celebrating Water Justice in Visalia! in Water Blog 2017-09-26 17:01:24 -0700

Celebrating Water Justice in Visalia!

 

We had so much fun celebrating the water justice movement in Visalia last Thursday!  See more pictures here or by clicking through the slide show above. 

In this current era of political turmoil, it was a great chance to connect with each other, celebrate progress, and remain united in our goals for social change despite the challenges facing the justice movement today. Thank to you everyone who supported the event and helped make the night so special.     

A huge thank you to our 25 sponsors without which the event would not have been possible. 

Sponsor_Poster-01.png

 


published Vanessa Michel in Our Team 2017-09-11 11:52:29 -0700

Vanessa Michel

Community Education & Engagement Coordinator

 20170911_092804.jpg

Vanessa has more than a decade working with immigrants from disadvantages communities in the San Joaquin Valley in California. Because of her own experience, to be Haitian-Mexican, she is always interested in working with immigrants to help them build a better community. Prior to joining Community Water Center (CWC), she worked at the General Consulate of Mexico in Sacramento. She hosted a radio show, “Escucha y házle la lucha”, to inform the community about different services such as social, labor rights and immigration attorneys; she also organized and coordinate different workshops about immigrants’ rights in Chico, California.

She graduated from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico (UNAM), in International Relations, she has a Master degree in Social Anthropology from Nanterre, Paris X University and for 4 years she did her fieldwork about political rights of immigrants without papers on her study case at a labor camp in Wasco, California, with two publications, one in UC Berkeley and the second at UNAM, Mexico. Besides working with CWC, she has three adorable boys who made her life more enjoyable to keep fighting for a better future.

Contact:

vanessa.michel@communitywatercenter.org
Sacramento Office, (916) 706-3346


July 2017 CWLN Newsletter

Introducing your new Community Water Leaders Network Coordinator! 

Starting this month, the Community Water Leaders Network has a new Coordinator! Adriana Renteria will start work as our new Regional Water Management Coordinator starting July 27th! Adriana comes from the University of California Santa Cruz where she she previously served as program coordinator for the People of Color Sustainability Collective. Originally from Merced, Adriana is excited to be headed home to the Valley and we can’t wait to welcome her to our team! In addition to coordinating the Network, Adriana will also be heading up CWC’s work with local Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) and Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) groups. Adriana will be reaching out to you in the coming month or so to introduce herself but in the meantime feel free to contact her, you can reach her at the Visalia office at 559-733-0219 or by email, adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org.


 

Network Roundtable discussion on water shortage contingency planning August 16th and cancellation of regular August briefing call

Next month, instead of our regular monthly briefing call for network members on the fourth Thursday of the month, we will be meeting in person for our second Community Water Leaders Network Roundtable discussion on water shortage contingency planning Thursday August 16th instead! Join us to hear about how the Governor’s plan for “Making Conservation a California Way of Life” is being used to proactively prepare California’s small and rural communities for the next drought. Each county will be required to conduct a vulnerability assessment of their water supplies and establish a Water Shortage Contingency Plan that will cover small, rural water systems and those served by domestic wells.

 

Date: Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

Time: 6-8 PM (dinner included)

Location: 900 W. Oak Ave, Visalia (note our new address)


 

Public Workshops on Low Income Rate Assistance Program

Implementation for AB 401, which requires the State Water Resources Control Board (“Water Board”) to develop a plan for a Low Income Rate Assistance (LIRA) program to help low-income residents pay their water bills, is underway. This summer, the Board is holding a series of public meetings (en español) to discuss possible program scenarios for how such a program may be structured. The next meeting will be held on August 10, 2017 in Fresno, California and is the only such meeting in the San Joaquin Valley. The workshop will give residents an opportunity to learn more about the affordability programs being considered and to share their experiences with the Water Board. Written comments on the published scenarios are due on August 25 and will help the Water Board design an effective, appropriate program to help low-income residents pay their water bills. We hope to see you at the meeting!


 

Maximum Contaminant Level Updates

 

Maximum Contaminant Level Set for Cancer-Causing 1,2,3 - TCP

This week, the State Water Board voted to adopt the MCL for 1,2,3-TCP at 5 parts per trillion. 1,2,3-TCP is a potent carcinogen that, while no longer used, still exists in groundwater and the soil from years of use within pesticides produced by Shell and Dow in the 1980’s and early 1990’s. The newly adopted MCL is set at the detection limit for the contaminant which means it is as close to the Public Health Goal as feasible. Under the new MCL, water systems will have to start testing for the contaminant by January 2018 and notify customers if an exceedance is detected. If an exceedance is detected, the water system must address the issue and work to treat the water. Unlike many other contaminants, most 1,2,3-TCP contamination is linked to two responsible parties: Shell and Dow Chemical. Shell and Dow have already lost lawsuits requiring them to clean-up contaminated groundwater, including in Clovis.

Hexavalent Chromium (Chrome 6) MCL Removed from Regulations 

In May a California court ruled in favor of the California Manufacturers and Technology Association who argued that in setting the Chrome 6 MCL, the Department of Public Health failed to complete an economic feasibility analysis. The court then ordered the State Water Board to not only halt enforcement of the MCL, but to remove the MCL from the regulations, and either complete an economic feasibility review or complete the MCL process over again. The State Water Board is still deciding upon which course of action they will take and will likely discuss the Chrome 6 MCL at the August 1st State Water Board hearing in Sacramento.

Initial MCL Review for Perchlorate Completed

In other Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) related news, on July 5th the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) considered the the findings of a recent review of the state’s perchlorate MCL of 6 ug/l which went into effect in late 2007.  In 2015, however, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment revised the public health goal for perchlorate from 6 ug/l to 1 ug/l. This revision triggered the State Water Board to review the MCL (which had been set at the public health goal). 

Because the current Detection Limit for purposes of Reporting (DLR) is set at 4 μg/l, however, there is currently not enough data available to understand the prevalence of perchlorate below that limit and therefore to assess the impacts of lowering the MCL from 6 ug/l. To remedy this problem, therefore, staff proposed that the Board first lower the Detection Limit for purposes of Reporting and then, if supported by new occurrence data, later replace the current MCL with a lower one. The board members approved of the staff plan. Therefore the next step is for staff to develop the revised Detection Limit for Purposes of Reporting which will then be subject to a 45-day comment period.

Based on the data we currently have with the current MCL and Detection Limit, between 2006 to 2016 there are 228 active and standby public water wells (of 12,237 wells tested) with at least one detection above the MCL. Most detections occurred in three counties, Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside.


 

 

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing: July 27, 4-5 PM

  1. Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. We changed service providers which means starting this month, we have a new conference call phone number and passcode. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Kristin know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.

Agenda:

            1.   Member updates and questions

            2.   Regional and state updates and questions

            3.   Monthly discussion topic: Annual reports/CCRs, AB 401 input


 

Upcoming Events and Trainings:

Find more information and more events check our online Community Water Leaders calendar at http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


 

Featured Resource of the Month: Community Groundwater Management Worksheet

The Community Groundwater Management Worksheet is a worksheet Community Water Center developed to help water system representatives identify and record information related to groundwater management and Sustainable Groundwater Management Act implementation in their area. Once filled out, the worksheet can be used as a reference sheet in meetings or for filling out data requests from your GSA. We plan to continue updating the worksheet to make it is useful as possible for groundwater dependent small systems. Another important document you may want to have on hand when talking about SGMA is your most recent Annual Electronic Report (EAR) submitted to the Division of Drinking Water. To access a PDF print out, simply log onto your system account and download the form.

You can find the worksheet, along with many other SGMA resources, on CWC’s SGMA webpage here: http://www.communitywatercenter.org/sgma_engagement

If you have ideas on how the worksheet could be modified or expanded, or have been asked to provide information to your GSA that is not included, let us know!


 

First Major Milestone Passed for SGMA Implementation, Groundwater Reform

As you know, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, known as SGMA, was passed by the California Legislature and signed by Governor Brown in 2014. The law identifies 127 high and medium-priority groundwater basins and requires that these basins be managed sustainably to ensure the long-term reliability of our groundwater resources. To achieve this goal, the act requires all 127 high and medium-priority groundwater basin to do three things: 1) Form Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) responsible for managing and regulating groundwater extraction by June 30, 2017; 2) Develop Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs) that outline local groundwater conditions and establish a clear and achievable path, including projects and management actions, for achieving sustainability; 3) Implement GSPs in order to achieve sustainable groundwater levels within twenty years (2040 for the Central Valley).

The first of these deadlines has just come and gone. As such, we know how many GSAs have formed and where and therefore who will be managing groundwater resources in the south San Joaquin Valley for the decades to come. The following GSAs have filed all the necessary paperwork to manage groundwater in their respective groundwater subbasins.

Kings subbasin:

  1. Kings River East GSA: A Special Act District (created by special state legislation) created to serve as the GSA for the greater-Alta Irrigation District area including the cities of Orange Cove, Reedley and Dinuba, communities of Orosi, Cutler, Sultana, East Orosi, and London.
  2. James Irrigation District: James ID will serve as a GSA for its own boundaries and the city of San Joaquin.
  3. North Kings GSA: A Joint Powers Authority comprised of many different agencies covering the greater Fresno and Clovis area.
  4. Central Kings GSA: Consolidated Irrigation District will serve as GSA for its boundaries and the city of Selma.
  5. South Kings GSA: A Joint Powers Authority of the four cities of Sanger, Kingsburg, Parlier and Fowler with a Memorandum of Understanding with Del Rey CSD.
  6. North Fork Kings River GSA: A Special Act District (created by special state legislation) created to serve as the GSA for western Fresno County including the communities of Riverdale, Lanare and Laton.
  7. McMullin group: A Joint Powers Authority of two irrigation/water districts with the County of Fresno for a smaller portion of west Fresno County.

Westside subbasin:

  1. Westlands Water District GSA: Westlands Water District, with an agreement with Fresno County, will serve as the GSA for the entire Westside subbasin.

Kaweah Subbasin:

  1. Mid-Kaweah GSA: A Joint Powers Authority made up of the Cities of Tulare and Visalia with Tulare Irrigation District.
  2. Greater Kaweah GSA: A Joint Powers Authority made up of several agencies headed up by Kaweah Delta Conservation District covering most of the Kaweah Subbasin including the cities of Exeter, Woodlake and Farmersville and communities of Ivanhoe, Lemon Cove, Patterson Tract and Tract 92.
  3. Eastern Kaweah GSA: A Joint Powers Authority between east side irrigation districts with federal water contracts and the City of Lindsay. 

Tule Subbasin:

  1.  Lower Tule River Irrigation District: Lower Tule River Irrigation District will serve as the GSA for their own boundaries and the communities of Woodville, Poplar and Tipton.
  2. Pixley Irrigation DIstrict: Pixley irrigation District will serve as the GSA for their own boundaries and the communities of Teviston and Pixley.
  3. Eastern Tule GSA: A Joint Powers Authority comprised of various east side water/irrigation districts and the city of Porterville.
  4. Delano-Earlimart Irrigation District: Delano Earlimart Irrigation District will serve as the GSA for their own boundaries and the community of Earlimart.
  5. Tri-County GSA: A Joint Powers Authority made up of Angiola Water District and Deer Creek stormwater district for much of the southwest of the County of Tulare covering parts of the Tule and Tulare Lake subbasins.
  6. Alpaugh GSA: A Joint Powers Authority comprised of Alpaugh CSD, Alpaugh Irrigation District and Atwell Island Water District covering parts of the Tule and Tulare Lake subbasins.

Tulare Lake subbasin:

  1. Tri-County GSA: A Joint Powers Authority made up of Angiola Water District and Deer Creek stormwater district for much of the southwest of the County of Tulare covering parts of the Tule and Tulare Lake subbasins.
  2. Alpaugh GSA: A Joint Powers Authority comprised of Alpaugh CSD, Alpaugh Irrigation District and Atwell Island Water District covering parts of the Tule and Tulare Lake subbasins.
  3. Mid-Kings GSA: A Joint Powers Authority for the central portion of the Tulare Lake Subbasin including the city of Hanford.
  4. South Fork Kings GSA: A Joint Powers Authority comprised of City of Lemoore, County of Kings, Empire West Side Irrigation District, Stratford Irrigation District and Stratford Public Utility District.
  5. Southwest Kings GSA:  A Joint Powers Authority between Dudley Ridge Water District, Tulare Lake Reclamation District No. 761, Tulare Lake Basin Water Storage District, Kettleman City Community Services District and the County of Kings that will serve as the GSA for the western edge of the subbasin.
  6. El Rico GSA: A Joint Powers Authority between a few water districts and Kings County which will serve as the GSA for the majority of the Tulare Lake subbasin.

Kern subbasin:

  1. Kern River GSA: A Joint Powers Authority between a local water district, a local improvement district and the city of Bakersfield will serve as the GSA for Bakersfield and areas southwest of bakersfield.
  2. Greenfield County Water District:  Greenfield will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  3. Buena Vista Water Storage District:  Buena Vista will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries and the community of Buttonwillow.
  4. West Kern Water District: West Kern Water District will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  5. Henry Miller Water District GSA: Henry Miller will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  6. Olcese GSA: Olcese will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  7. Pioneer GSA: Pioneer will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  8. Semitropic Water Storage District GSA: Semitropic will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  9. Kern Groundwater Authority GSA: A Joint Powers Authority made up of several agencies covering most of the Kern Subbasin
  10. Cawelo Water District GSA: Cawelo Water District will serve as a GSA for their own boundaries.
  11. McFarland GSA: The City of McFarland will serve as a GSA for the city boundaries. 

Where there are more than one GSA in a subbasin, developing Groundwater Plans will need to involve two different levels of work, subbasin-wide efforts requiring the coordination of all subbasin GSAs, and GSA-specific work. Both are crucial to ensuring safe and affordable drinking water for your community long into the future. For help getting involved with your local GSA or subbasin coordination efforts, contact CWC.


 

REMINDER: Reduced Annual Fees for DAC Public Water Systems

On May 15, 2017 the State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water issued a letter to Community Public Water Systems informing them of the possibility of reducing their Annual Fee if the system serves a Disadvantaged Community (DAC). 

If you qualify (the Median Household Income in your community is less than $49,454), the reduced fee for your water system will be based on the number of connections that you serve. Systems serving fewer than 100 connections will pay $100. Systems serving 15,000 connections or less will pay $100 plus $2 for each service connection greater than 100.

If you believe your water system is eligible and wish to receive a reduced Annual Fee, submit a request in the form of a signed letter and include information demonstrating that your community meets the definition of a Disadvantaged Community, the DDW will respond.

You can find the letter they sent here. If you have any questions, contact your District Engineer. 


 


CWLN boletin de julio 2017

¡Les presentamos a nuestra nueva Coordinadora de la Red Comunitaria de Líderes por el Agua! 

¡A partir de este mes, la Red Comunitaria de Líderes por el Agua tiene una nueva Coordinadora! Adriana Rentería que comenzará a trabajar a partir del 27 de julio como nuestra nueva Coordinadora de la Gestión Regional por el Agua! Adriana viene de la Universidad de California en Santa Cruz, donde trabajó como coordinadora del programa para la Colectiva “People of Color Sustainability”. Rentería es originaria de Merced y está emocionada de regresar de nuevo a su casa en el Valle, y nosotros no podemos esperar para darle la bienvenida a nuestro equipo! Además de coordinar la Red Comunitaria, Adriana también dirigirá el trabajo del CWC con los grupos locales de las Agencias de Sostenibilidad del Agua Subterránea (GSAs, por sus siglas en inglés) y de la Gestión Regional Integrada por el Agua (IRWM, por sus siglas en inglés). Adriana se comunicará con usted el próximo mes para presentarse, mientras tanto, siéntase con la libertad de contactarla. Puede comunicarse con ella a la oficina de Visalia al 559-733-0219 o al siguiente correo electrónico: adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org


Mesa redonda de la Red sobre la planificación de contingencia por la escasez de agua que será el 16 de agosto y la cancelación de nuestras juntas telefónicas regulares en el mes de agosto.

El mes que viene, en lugar de tener nuestra llamada regular cada cuarto jueves del mes con los miembros de la red, nos estaremos reuniendo en persona para nuestra segunda mesa redonda de la Red de Líderes de Agua de la Comunidad para discutir sobre la planificación de contingencia por la escasez de agua que será el jueves 16 de agosto. Únase con nosotros para escuchar cómo el plan del gobernador titulado: "Hacer de la Conservación un Estilo de Vida en California" está siendo usado y así poder preparar proactivamente a las comunidades rurales y pequeñas de California para la próxima sequía. Cada condado deberá realizar una evaluación de vulnerabilidad de sus suministros de agua y deben establecer un Plan de Contingencia por la Escasez de Agua que cubra los sistemas de agua rurales y pequeños, y de aquellos que tengan pozos domésticos.

 

Fecha: El miércoles 16 de agosto, 2017.

Horario: 6-8 PM (cena incluida)

Ubicación: 900 W. Oak Ave, Visalia (en nuestra nueva oficina)


 

Talleres públicos sobre el Programa de ayuda para mantener tarifas bajas a personas con bajos ingresos (LIRA, por sus siglas en inglés) 

La implementación del AB 401, requiere que la Mesa Estatal del Control de Recursos Hídricos ("Mesa del Agua") desarrolle un Plan de ayuda para mantener tarifas bajas a personas con bajos ingresos (LIRA, por sus siglas en inglés) para pagar sus facturas o “billes” del agua. Este verano, la Mesa del Agua llevará a cabo una serie de reuniones públicas (en español) para discutir posibles escenarios del programa sobre cómo estructurar dicho programa. La próxima reunión se llevará a cabo el 10 de agosto de 2017 en Fresno, California y será la única reunión de este tipo en el Valle de San Joaquín. El taller dará la oportunidad a los residentes de aprender más acerca de los programas de asistencia económica que se están considerando y poder compartir sus experiencias con la Mesa del Agua. Los comentarios por escrito sobre los diferentes escenarios deben presentarse el 25 de agosto para ser publicados, y ayudarán a la Mesa de Agua a diseñar un programa efectivo y apropiado para ayudar a los residentes de bajos ingresos a pagar sus facturas del agua. ¡Esperamos verlos en la reunión!


 

 

Actualizaciones Sobre El Nivel Máximo De Contaminantes

El Nivel Máximo Establecido de Contaminantes del 1,2,3 – TCP y que causa el Cáncer

Esta semana, la Mesa Estatal del Agua votó a favor para adoptar el Nivel Máximo de Contaminantes (MCL, por sus siglas en inglés) para el 1,2,3 -TCP que estableció a 5 partes por billón. El 1,2,3 -TCP es un potente cancerígeno que, aunque ya no se utiliza, todavía existe en las aguas subterráneas y el suelo por todos los años de uso de los plaguicidas utilizados por las compañías Shell y Dow en los años 80s y principios de 1990. El MCL recién adoptado establece el límite de detección del contaminante, lo que significa que está cerca de la Meta de Salud Pública. Bajo el nuevo MCL, los sistemas de agua tendrán que empezar en enero del 2018 a hacer pruebas para detectar si tienen este contaminante y notificar a los clientes si se detecta un excedente del límite establecido. Si se detecta un excedente del límite establecido, el sistema de agua debe abordar el problema y trabajar para tratar el agua. A diferencia de muchos otros contaminantes, la mayoría de la contaminación por el 1,2,3-TCP está vinculada a dos partes responsables: las compañías “Shell” y “Dow Chemical”. Ambas compañías, “Shell” y “Dow”, ya han perdido juicios por lo que requieren que limpien las aguas subterráneas contaminadas, incluyendo a la Ciudad de Clovis.

El Nivel Máximo del Contaminante (MCL) Cromo Hexavalente (Cromo 6) ha sido Eliminado de las Regulaciones

En mayo, un tribunal de California falló a favor de la Asociación de Productores y Tecnología de California, quien argumentó que el Departamento de Salud Pública no pudo completar el análisis de viabilidad económica para establecer el Nivel Máximo del Contaminante (MCL) del Cromo 6. Entonces, el tribunal ordenó a la Mesa Estatal del Agua que no sólo detuviera la aplicación del MCL, sino que también eliminara el MCL de las regulaciones, y ya sea que completara la revisión de viabilidad económica o que completara nuevamente el proceso del MCL. La Mesa Estatal del Agua todavía está decidiendo qué curso de acción tomarán y probablemente discutirán el MCL del Cromo 6 en la audiencia de la Mesa Estatal del Agua que se llevará a cabo el 1º de agosto en Sacramento.

La Revisión Inicial del Nivel Máximo de Contaminantes (MCL) para el Perclorato ha terminado.

Otras noticias relacionadas con el Nivel Máximo de Contaminantes (MCL), el 5 de julio, la Mesa Estatal del Control de Recursos Hídricos (SWRCB, por sus siglas en inglés) consideró los resultados que dio a conocer el Estado con una revisión reciente del MCL en el Perclorato de 6ug/I y que entró en vigor a finales del 2007. Sin embargo, en el 2015, la Oficina de Evaluación de Peligros para la Salud Ambiental revisó la meta de la salud pública para el perclorato de 6ug/I a 1ug/I. Esta revisión provocó que la Mesa Estatal del Agua revisara el MCL (que se había fijado como una meta en la salud pública).

Debido a que el Límite de Detección con el Fin de Presentar un Reporte (DLR, por sus siglas en inglés) actual está establecido en 4 μg/l, actualmente no hay suficientes datos disponibles para entender el predominio del Perclorato para que esté por debajo de ese límite y, por lo tanto, para lograr disminuir del MCL de 6 ug/I. Para resolver este problema, el personal propuso que primero la Mesa redujera el Límite de Detección con el fin de presentar un Reporte  y, después, si es apoyado por los nuevos datos obtenidos se sustituya el actual MCL por uno inferior. Los miembros de la Mesa aprobaron el Plan del personal. Por lo tanto, el siguiente paso es que el personal desarrolle y revise el Límite de Detección con el Fin de Presentar un Reporte para que entonces esté sujeto a un periodo para comentarios al público durante 45 días.

Sobre la base de datos que tenemos actualmente en el MCL y el Límite de Detección, entre el año 2006 y 2016 existen 228 pozos de agua públicos en uso y en espera (de 12,237 pozos ya probados) con al menos una detección por encima límite del MCL. La mayoría de las detecciones ocurrieron en tres condados, Los Ángeles, San Bernardino, y Riverside.


 

No te pierdas de nuestra próxima llamada informativa de la Red: 27 de julio, 4-5 pm. 

  1. Las juntas informativas de la Red son conferencias telefónicas mensuales que permiten a los miembros de la Red la oportunidad de conectarse unos con otros, realizar preguntas, y recibir información desde la comodidad de su casa. Hemos cambiado de proveedor para el servicio de llamadas, lo que significa que empezando este mes tendremos un nuevo número de teléfono y una nueva clave para tener la conferencia telefónica. Para participar, simplemente marque (929) 432-4463, cuando se le solicite el código de acceso marque 5254-59-7515 y presione la tecla # cuando se le solicite. Comuníquese con Adriana si necesita una tarjeta prepagada para llamar de larga distancia. 

Agenda:

  1. Resumen y preguntas de los integrantes.
  2. Resumen y preguntas sobre el agua a nivel regional y estatal.
  3. Tema mensual a discutir: Reportes anuales / CCRs, aportar en la AB 401.

Próximos eventos y entrenamientos: 

Puede encontrar más información y eventos sobre los Líderes Comunitarios por el Agua en el siguiente calendario en línea: http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


 

Anuncios destacados del mes: Borrador sobre el Manejo de las Aguas Subterráneas en las Comunidades

El borrador sobre el Manejo de las Aguas Subterráneas en las Comunidades es una hoja de trabajo desarrollada por el Centro Comunitario por el Agua para ayudar a los representantes del sistema de agua a identificar y registrar la información relacionada con el manejo de las aguas subterráneas y la implementación de la Ley de Manejo de Aguas Subterráneas en su área. Una vez completada, la hoja de trabajo puede utilizarse como una hoja de referencia en reuniones o para agregarle datos sobre su GSA. Estamos planeando en continuar actualizando la hoja de trabajo para hacerla lo más útil posible para los pequeños sistemas que dependen de las aguas subterráneas. Otro documento importante que le interesaría tener a la mano cuando se hable de SGMA es tener su más reciente Reporte Electrónico Anual (EAR) y presentarlo a la División del Agua Potable. Para acceder a una impresión en versión PDF, simplemente ingrese a su cuenta del agua y descargue el formulario.

Puede encontrar la hoja de trabajo, junto con muchos otros recursos del SGMA, en la página web SGMA del CWC en: http://www.communitywatercenter.org/sgma_engagement

Si tiene algunas ideas sobre cómo se puede modificar o ampliar la hoja de trabajo, o si se le ha pedido que proporcione información a su GSA  y ve que no está incluida, por favor,¡hágalo saber!


 

Reforma del Agua Subterránea: Fue aceptada la Implementación de SGMA, es un primer paso importante.

Como saben, la Ley de Manejo Sustentable de las Aguas Subterráneas, conocida como SGMA, fue aprobada por la Legislatura de California y firmada por el Gobernador Brown en el año 2014. La ley identifica a 127 cuencas subterráneas con una prioridad alta y media, y requiere que estas cuencas sean manejadas de manera sostenible para asegurar la fiabilidad a largo plazo de nuestros recursos de aguas subterráneas. Para lograr este objetivo, la ley requiere que las 127 cuencas subterráneas que tengan una prioridad alta y media hagan tres cosas: 1) Formen Agencias de Sostenibilidad del Agua Subterránea (GSAs) responsables de manejar y regular la extracción del agua subterránea para antes del 30 de junio del 2017; 2) Elaborar los Planes de Manejo Sostenible de Aguas Subterráneas (GSP) que describan las condiciones de las aguas subterráneas locales y establezcan un camino claro y alcanzable, incluyendo los proyectos y las medidas de acción para lograr la sostenibilidad; 3) Implementar los GSP con el fin de alcanzar niveles sostenibles del agua subterránea dentro de veinte años (2040 para el Valle Central). 

El primero de estos plazos acaba de suceder y ya está cerrado. Como tal, sabemos dónde y cuántas GSAs se han formado, y por lo tanto, quién debería manejar los recursos de aguas subterráneas en el sur del Valle San Joaquín en las próximas décadas. La siguiente lista de GSAs ha archivado toda la documentación necesaria para manejar el agua subterránea en sus respectivas subcuencas subterráneas.

La Subcuenca de Kings:

  1. La Agencia de Sostenibilidad de Agua Subterránea (GSA, por sus siglas en inglés) en el Este del Rio Kings: Una Ley del Distrito Especial (creada por una legislación estatal especial) fue creada para servir como GSA para la gran área del Distrito de Riego, que incluye a las ciudades de Orange Cove, Reedley y Dinuba, las comunidades de Orosi, Cutler, Sultana, el Este de Orosi y London.
  2. El Distrito de Riego de James: El ID de James servirá como una GSA para su propia área y de la ciudad de San Joaquín.
  3. La GSA en el Norte de Kings: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos (JPA, por sus siglas en inglés) compuesta por muchas agencias diferentes que cubren el área de Fresno y Clovis.
  4. La GSA en el Centro de Kings: El Distrito de Consolidación de Riego servirá como GSA para sus límites territoriales y para la ciudad de Selma.
  5. La GSA en el Sur de Kings: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos de las cuatro ciudades de Sanger, Kingsburg, Parlier y Fowler con un Memorando de Entendimiento con la ciudad Del Reys, y el Distrito de Servicios a la Comunidad (CSD, por sus siglas en inglés).
  6. La GSA de la parte Norte del Rio Fork King: Es un Distrito de Ley Especial creada por la legislación estatal especial para servir como GSA para la zona oeste del Condado de Fresno, incluyendo a las comunidades de Riverdale, Lanare y Laton.
  7. El Grupo de McMullin: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos de dos distritos de riego / agua con el condado de Fresno y una porción más pequeña de la zona oeste del condado de Fresno. 

La Subcuenca de la zona oeste:

  1. La GSA del Distrito del Agua de Westlands: El Distrito del Agua, con el acuerdo del Condado de Fresno, estará sirviendo como una GSA para toda la subcuenca de la zona Oeste.

La Subcuenca de Kaweah:

  1. La GSA de la zona media de Kaweah: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos compuesta por las ciudades de Tulare y Visalia, incluyendo el Distrito de Riego de Tulare.
  2. La GSA de la zona más grande de Kaweah: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos compuesta por varias agencias encabezadas por el Distrito de Conservación del Delta Kaweah que cubre la mayor parte de la Subcuenca Kaweah incluyendo las ciudades de Exeter, Woodlake y Farmersville, y las comunidades de Ivanhoe, Lemon Cove, Patterson Tract y Tract 92.
  3. La GSA de la zona Este de Kaweah: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos entre los distritos de riego de la zona este con los contratos federales de agua y la Ciudad de Lindsay.

La Subcuenca de Tule:

  1. El Distrito de Riego de la parte baja del Rio Tule: El Distrito de Riego de la parte baja del Rio Tule servirá como GSA para sus propios límites y de las comunidades de Woodville, Poplar y Tipton.
  2. El Distrito de Riego de Pixley: El Distrito de Riego de Pixley servirá como GSA para sus propios límites y de las comunidades de Teviston y Pixley.
  3. La GSA de la zona este de Tule: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos compuesta por varios distritos de agua / riego de la zona este y la ciudad de Porterville.
  4. El Distrito de Riego de Delano-Earlimart: El Distrito de Riego de Delano-Earlimart servirá como la GSA para sus propios límites y la comunidad de Earlimart.
  5. La GSA del Trio-Condado: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos está compuesta por el distrito de agua de Angiola y el distrito de aguas pluviales de Deer Creek que comprende una gran parte del suroeste del condado de Tulare y cubre partes de las subcuencas de Tule y las subcuencas del Lago de Tulare.
  6. La GSA de Alpaugh: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos está compuesta por el CSD de Alpaugh, el Distrito de Riego de Alpaugh y el Distrito de Agua de Atwell Island que cubre partes de las subcuencas de Tule y del Lago de Tulare. 

La Subcuenca del Lago de Tulare:

  1. La GSA del Tri-Condado: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos está compuesta por el Distrito de Agua de Angiola y el Distrito de aguas pluviales de Deer Creek, mayormente en la zona suroeste del Condado de Tulare que cubre parte de las subcuencas de Tule y del Lago de Tulare.
  2. La GSA de Alpaugh: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos está compuesta por el CSD de Alpaugh, el Distrito de Riego de Alpaugh y del Distrito de Agua de Atwell Island que cubren parte de las subcuencas de Tule y del Lago de Tulare.
  3. La GSA de la zona media de Kings: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos para la parte central de la subcuenca del Lago de Tulare incluyendo la Ciudad de Hanford.
  4. La GSA de la zona Sur de Fork Kings: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos compuesta por la Ciudad de Lemoore, el condado de Kings, el Distrito de Riego de la zona oeste de Empire, el Distrito de Riego de Stratford y el Distrito de Servicios Públicos de Stratford.
  5. La GSA de la zona suroeste de Kings: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos entre el Distrito de Agua de Dudley Ridge, el Distrito de Reciclaje del Lago de Tulare Num. 761, el Distrito de Almacenamiento de Agua de la Cuenca del Lago de Tulare, el Distrito de Servicios Comunitarios de la Ciudad de Kettleman y el Condado de Kings que servirán como GSA para el borde de la zona oeste la subcuenca.
  6. La GSA de El Rico: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos entre unos cuantos distritos del agua y el Condado de Kings servirán como GSA para la mayor parte de la subcuenca del Lago de Tulare.

La Subcuenca de Kern:

  1. La GSA del Río de Kern: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos entre el Distrito del Agua local, el distrito de mejoramiento local y la ciudad de Bakersfield servirá como la GSA para Bakersfield y las áreas que se encuentran al suroeste de Bakersfield.
  2. El Distrito del Agua en el Condado de Greenfield: Greenfield servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  3. El Distrito de Almacenamiento de Agua en Buena Vista: Buena Vista servirá como GSA para sus propios límites y para la comunidad de Buttonwillow.
  4. El Distrito del Agua del Oeste de Kern: El Distrito del Agua del Oeste de Kern servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  5. La GSA del Distrito del Agua de Henry Miller: Henry Miller servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  6. La GSA de Olcese: Olcese servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  7. La GSA de Pioneer: Pioneer servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  8. La GSA del Distrito se de Almacenamiento de agua de Semitropic: Semitropic servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  9. La GSA de la Autoridad de Aguas Subterráneas de Kern: La Agencia de Poderes Conjuntos compuesta por varias agencias que cubren la mayor parte de la subcuenca de Kern
  10. La GSA del Distrito del Agua de Cawelo: El Distrito del Agua de Cawelo servirá como GSA para sus propios límites.
  11. La GSA de McFarland: La Ciudad de McFarland servirá como GSA para los límites de la ciudad.

Si hay más de una GSA en una subcuenca, y para desarrollar los Planes de las Aguas Subterráneas se necesitarán involucrar dos niveles diferentes de trabajo, los esfuerzos de la subcuenca requerirá de la coordinación de todas las subcuencas que son parte de las GSAs y, necesitarán trabajar específicamente con la GSA. Ambos son cruciales para asegurar el agua potable, segura y económica en su comunidad durante mucho tiempo en el futuro. Para involucrarse con su GSA local y obtener ayuda sobre la coordinación de subcuencas, comuníquese con el CWC.


 

RECORDATORIO: Tarifas anuales reducidas para los sistemas públicos de agua en las Comunidades de Bajos Recursos (DAC, por sus siglas en inglés)

El 15 de mayo del 2017, la División la Mesa Estatal del Control de Recursos Hídricos envió una carta al Sistema de Agua Pública de la Comunidad informándoles de la posibilidad de reducir su cuota anual si el sistema sirve en las Comunidades de Bajos Recursos (DAC).

Si usted califica ( Necesita un ingreso familiar medio en su comunidad de menos de $ 49,454), la tarifa reducida para su sistema de agua se basará en el número de conexiones que usted tiene. Los sistemas que tienen menos de 100 conexiones pagarán $ 100. Los sistemas que tienen 15,000 conexiones o menos pagarán $100 más $2 por cada conexión de servicio que sea mayor de 100.

Si usted cree que su sistema de agua es elegible y desea recibir la cuota anual reducida, envíe una solicitud y una carta firmada e incluya información que demuestre que su comunidad cumple con la definición de Comunidad de Bajo Recursos, y el DDW le responderá.

Usted puede encontrar la carta que enviaron aquí. Si usted tiene alguna pregunta, comuníquese con su Ingeniero del Distrito.


 

 


CWLN boletin de mayo 2017

Los Condados para crear un Plan sobre la Escasez de Agua en las Comunidades Rurales y Pequeñas.

El informe final “Hacer de la Conservación un Estilo de Vida en California”, fue publicado el mes pasado y describe un plan que implementa la Orden Ejecutiva B-37-16. El plan trata de eliminar los desechos de agua, de actualizar los Planes de Contingencia para la Escasez de Agua Urbana y Agrícola (WSCP, por sus siglas en inglés), de actualizar las normas de eficiencia del agua para los proveedores de agua en las comunidades rurales y de mejorar los planes de escasez de agua para los pequeños proveedores de agua y en las comunidades rurales. A diferencia de la mayoría de los otros componentes que aparecen en el reporte, los caules amplían o actualizan los requisitos existentes, en esta última parte sobre mejorar la planeación sobre la sequía con los pequeños proveedores de agua (incluyendo los pequeños sistemas de agua pública y propietarios con pozos privados es un requisito completamente nuevo para California. Estases una brecha importante en la planeación actual que necesitamos cubrir, porque como demostró esta sequía, los residentes en las zonas rurales están entre los más afectados de las zonas por emergencias de sequías. Además, con el cambio climático, es muy probable que volvamos a experimentar una sequía prolongada como la que acabamos de pasar, por ello, será mejor que tomemos medidas a tiempo para reducir la vulnerabilidad de los residentes en zonas rurales y desarrollar planes de respuesta efectiva para cuando ocurra una emergencia durante la sequía.

El informe especifica que cada condado tendrá que establecer un Plan de Contingencia de Escasez del Agua para aquellas áreas que no están actualmente cubiertas por el Plan de Contingencia de Escasez de Agua Urbana (se requiere para las ciudades con 10 mil habitantes o más). Además de requerir que los planes incluyan una evaluación de vulnerabilidad en los suministros de agua, acciones proactivas para reducir la vulnerabilidad, y un plan reactivo que incluyan protocolos de comunicación cuando surja la escasez de agua. El informe final del gobernador incluye pocos detalles de cómo este requisito tendrá que ser implementado o cómo tendría que verse. Uno de los grupos involucrados en este tema ha comenzado a reunirse para trabajar en los detalles faltantes, y es muy importante que los pequeños sistemas de agua y los propietarios de pozos privados participen para asegurarse que estos esfuerzos cubran las necesidades. El próximo taller público para discutir este componente del plan se llevará a cabo en junio, sin embargo, la fecha exacta todavía no está confirmada.


RECORDATORIO: Discusión de la mesa redonda sobre el agua económica en nuestra red el pasado 23 de mayo y cancelación de la llamada informativa.

Este mes, en lugar de tener nuestra llamada informativa mensual para los miembros de la red cada cuarto jueves del mes, nos estaremos reuniendo en persona para nuestra segunda mesa redonda de la Red Comunitaria de Líderes de Agua para hablar sobre el agua económica el próximo martes 23 de mayo. Asista a esta junta para escuchar sobre dos importantes esfuerzos relacionados con el agua económica que se están discutiendo en Sacramento, las propuestas de ley SB 623 y la AB 401, ¡y comparta sus ideas y comentarios con la Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua!

Fecha: El martes 23 de mayo, 2017.

Horario: 6-8 pm (incluye comida).

Lugar: 311 W. Murray Ave., Visalia.

*Debido al evento de la mesa redonda, no tendremos la llamada informativa de la red este mes.


Fondo Rotativo Estatal del Agua Potable: 2017-2018, Periodo de Comentarios del Plan de Uso Previsto.

A principios de este mes, la Mesa Estatal del Agua publicó un proyecto del Fondo Rotativo Estatal del Agua Potable (DWSRF, por sus siglas en inglés) Plan de Uso Previsto (IUP, por sus siglas en inglés) para el año 2017-2018. El DWSRF otorga préstamos y becas para la planeación y diseño de los sistemas de agua, y construcción de proyectos de mejoramiento de agua potable, incluyendo, pero no limitado a la perforación de nuevos pozos, extensiones en el servicio y el fortalecimiento. El IUP establece las directrices sobre cómo se priorizarán los fondos y quién será elegible para los diferentes tipos de financiación. Por ejemplo, las becas o la exención de la deuda principal sólo están disponibles para las Comunidades Económicamente Desfavorecidas (DACs) y Comunidades Gravemente Desfavorecidas SDACs. Cada año, la Mesa actualiza sus directrices para reflejar sus prioridades actuales y /o la disponibilidad de los fondos emitiendo primero un borrador para recibir comentarios del público y después obtener la versión final. El borrador de este año se puede encontrar en línea.

Como líderes de la comunidad por el agua, es importante entender los cambios del IUP y cómo pueden tener un impacto en su distrito. Además, su experiencia los sitúa de una manera única para proporcionar comentarios sobre cómo mejorar el IUP. La fecha límite para recibir los comentarios es el 5 de junio al mediodía. Para obtener mayor información sobre cómo enviar sus comentarios, incluyendo la dirección postal y las instrucciones de cómo enviarlos por correo electrónico, por favor consulte el aviso oficial del IUP. El IUP se presentará ante la Mesa Estatal del Agua en el taller del 20 de junio en Sacramento, donde la Mesa estará aceptando comentarios del público.


Anuncios Destacados del Mes:

Recursos sobre el Informe de Confianza al Consumidor (CCR)

Por ley, todos los sistemas de agua pública necesitan desarrollar y distribuir un Informe Anual de Confianza al Consumidor (CCR, por sus siglas en inglés) a sus clientes en o antes del 1º de julio del 2017. Los CCRs son muy importantes ya que permiten a los consumidores estar bien informados antes de tomar decisiones sobre cualquier riesgo potencial para la salud relacionado con la calidad, el tratamiento y el manejo del suministro del agua potable, y sabemos lo estresante y tardado que puede ser. Aquí les presentamos algunos de los recursos para ayudarles a que el proceso de este año sea un poco más fácil si todavía se sigue apresurando para hacerlo.

  • El 24 de mayo de 10:00 AM a 12:00 PM ó 2:00 PM a 4:00 PM, la Corporación de Asistencia de Comunidades Rurales (RCAC, por sus siglas en inglés) llevará a cabo una capacitación en línea sobre los CCRs que no sólo puede ayudarle a entender mejor los requisitos sino también le puede ayudar en hacer su CCR juntos. Se puede registrar de forma gratuita en el sitio web de RCAC. Si necesita un lugar para hacer el entrenamiento estamos encantados en ayudarle con el entrenamiento en nuestra sala de conferencias en Visalia.
  • La Agencia de Protección Ambiental (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés) tiene una guía de referencia rápida que es útil tener a la mano mientras prepara su informe. Usted puede encontrar la guía aquí.
  • La Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua en California tiene un documento de orientación sobre los CCRs para proveedores de agua, y lo puede encontrar en su sitio web junto con información sobre la traducción del CCR y ejemplos que puede usar a su conveniencia.

¡Aparta el día!: Taller sobre el Plan de Sostenibilidad del Agua Subterránea que se llevará a cabo el 24 de junio.

¿Perdiste el taller del Plan de Sostenibilidad del Agua Subterránea que se llevó a cabo en abril? Asista el 24 de junio de 10 AM - 2:30 PM a la repetición del taller en nuestro seminario gratuito, que durará medio día en el Café 210 en Visalia. Bajo la nueva Ley de Manejo Sostenible de las Aguas Subterráneas, o SGMA, se necesitan de manera crucial los Planes de Sostenibilidad de las Aguas Subterráneas para asegurar que en el futuro su comunidad cuente con agua sana, limpia y económica. Como representante de un pequeño sistema de agua, su voz es importante en el proceso SGMA y nos queremos asegurar de que tenga las herramientas y la información necesaria para participar sin ningún problema. Este taller está diseñado para pequeños sistemas de agua potable en el Valle Central y le ayudará a preparar a directores y al personal para que participen activamente en el desarrollo del Plan de Sostenibilidad del Agua Subterránea (SPG) en su área. Llame a Kristin al 559-733-0219 para reservar su lugar. El cupo es limitado.


Próximos Eventos y Entrenamientos:

  • El 23 de mayo, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Entrenamiento de RCAC en línea. Aspectos Básicos de la Junta: Planificación de mejoras del capital. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • El 24 de mayo, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM ó 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM. Entrenamiento de RCAC en línea. Informes de Confianza al Consumidor. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • El 31 de mayo, 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Entrenamiento de RCAC en línea. Aspectos Básicos de la Junta: Ajuste de la tarifa. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • El 5 de junio, 12:00 PM. Comentarios del público para el Plan de Uso Previsto del 2017 para el Fondo Rotativo Estatal del Agua Potable (DWSRF). Para más información visite: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/public_notices/comments/index.shtml o comuníquese al (916) 327-9978.
  • El 6 de junio, 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Comité Coordinador de Financiamiento en California 2017 (CFCC, por sus siglas en inglés) y el Centro de Educación de Energía Edison del Sur de California. Plática sobre el financiamiento justo (4175 S. Laspina, Tulare, CA 93274). Regístrese gratis en http://www.cfcc.ca.gov/funding-fairs/.
  • Del 29-30 de junio. Taller de la Red del Centro de Finanzas Ambientales. Taller de liderazgo a través de la toma de decisiones y la comunicación para pequeños sistemas de agua en Rancho Cucamonga. Regístrese gratis en: http://efcnetwork.org/events/california-leadership- decision-making-communication- workshop-small-water-systems /

Encuentre más eventos en línea de los Líderes de la Comunidad por el Agua, en nuestro calendario que se encuentran en: http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network


Revisando el Estudio del Agua en las Comunidades Económicamente Desfavorecidas (DAC, por sus siglas en inglés) de la Cuenca del Lago de Tulare en el 2014.

En la conferencia telefónica de la Red Informativa del mes de abril, discutimos el Estudio del Agua en las Comunidades Económicamente en Desaventajada de la Cuenca del Lago de Tulare del 2014 y qué tan útiles han sido las recomendaciones recibidas en las mesas locales sobre el agua después de tres años.

El estudio, que resultó de una donación de $ 2 millones recibida por Departamento de Recursos del Agua del Condado de Tulare para desarrollar un plan para el agua a nivel regional y las aguas residuales en las comunidades económicamente desfavorecidas (DACs, por sus siglas en inglés) en la Cuenca del Lago de Tulare, incluyendo las áreas del Condado de Fresno, Kern, Reyes y Tulare. Informados por un proceso de participación extensiva por los grupos interesados en el tema, el estudio identificó cuáles son las principales prioridades que limitan el acceso a soluciones al agua potable y las aguas residuales de la región, incluyendo: la falta de financiación para compensar los altos costos de operaciones y de mantenimiento en gran parte por la falta de la economía de escala; la falta de capacidad técnica, administrativa y financiera (TMF) por los proveedores de agua y aguas residuales; la poca calidad del agua; la falta o el alto costo de financiación o las restricciones de financiación para realizar mejoras; la falta de residentes informados, capacitados o comprometidos; la falta de visión y planificación integrada para desarrollar soluciones; la inadecuada infraestructura existente; la falta de información sobre las DAC; el cambio regulatorio del ambiente; y, la cantidad insuficiente de agua.

Para abordar estas cuestiones prioritarias, el estudio propuso 59 recomendaciones específicas para lograr soluciones de agua en comunidades sostenibles. De estas recomendaciones, a continuación, presentamos las que fueron dirigidas a los proveedores de agua locales:

  • Asegurar que se conozcan los detalles específicos de la existente infraestructura. Tener acceso a los registros y mantenerlos.
  • Realizar una revisión fiscal anual para determinar los niveles necesarios de los recursos para el reemplazo/mantenimiento y el periodo de tiempo/plan de financiamiento apropiado.
  • Asistir a programas de capacitación y alentar o requerir que los miembros de la mesa directiva y el personal asistan a programas de capacitación.
  • Incluso fuera de los proyectos más grandes sobre infraestructura, desarrollar procesos para compartir recursos comunes y otras formas de consolidación para ayudar a reducir los costos de O & M y mejorar la capacidad TMF.
  • Las alternativas del proyecto deben ser analizadas para minimizar los costos de O & M.
  • Evaluar las tarifas cada tres a cinco años y modificarlas según convenga para alcanzar los objetivos financieros.
  • Buscar fondos para instalar medidores, tener acceso a leer los medidores a distancia y considerar acuerdos con asociaciones de vecinos para apoyar los costos.
  • Establecer tarifas apropiadas a cualquier nueva conexión para apoyar las mejoras del capital necesarias y poder atender las nuevas conexiones.
  • Desarrollar un plan de O & M.
  • No permitir nuevas conexiones si la capacidad del servicio no está confirmada.
  • Asistir a talleres sobre la solicitud de subvenciones.
  • Participar en las reuniones del grupo IRWM y considerar en interesarse por ser parte del grupo.
  • Proporcionar a la comunidad toda la información que sea posible y darle a conocer pronta información para que aporten con ideas.
  • Intente entrar en contacto con la comunidad en persona, por teléfono o por correo postal. El correo electrónico y el sitio web no es suficiente.
  • Ampliar el compromiso de la comunidad con el desarrollo de proyectos
  • Implementar una orden que prohíba la perforación de nuevos pozos dentro del límite de PWS y notificar al condado sobre la orden.

Continuaremos hablando acerca de cómo estas y otras recomendaciones para los sistemas de agua en el valle se pueden implementar potencialmente para abordar temas prioritarios hoy en el 2017. Si desea obtener más información sobre el estudio, puede encontrar todos los documentos del estudio aquí.


Tema de acción: Apoya la Ley 623 del Senado - Creación de un nuevo fondo estatal para tener agua sana, segura y económica.

El 19 de abril, la Ley 623 del Senado (liderada por el senador Bill Monning) recibió un voto unánime por parte de los miembros del Comité sobre la Calidad Ambiental del Senado. Este voto monumental significa que el proyecto de ley pasó la primera etapa para convertirse en ley, pero todavía hay más votos por delante que esperar. El siguiente paso para el proyecto de ley será un voto por el Comité de Apropiaciones del Senado y luego un voto por parte de todo el Senado, que probablemente ocurrirá para antes del 2 de junio. Su ayuda es necesaria para asegurar que el voto sea igual de exitoso como el anterior.

La SB 623 establecería un nuevo Fondo para el Agua Potable y Económica. El Fondo estaría autorizado para proporcionar sistemas provisionales de agua potable y financiar soluciones de agua potable a largo plazo, incluyendo los costos de O & M, para las comunidades de bajos ingresos que necesitan tratamiento del agua potable. El Fondo sería administrado por la Oficina de Soluciones Sustentables del Agua en la Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua, y también podría ser usado para financiar un programa estatal de agua potable a bajos costos.

Su mesa puede ayudar a que esta fuente de financiamiento sostenible para las comunidades sea una realidad con una aprobación de apoyo a la resolución. Agende este tema para su próxima junta y pregunte a sus miembros si están dispuestos en apoyar la propuesta sobre el Fondo para el Agua Potable y Económica. Nuestro sitio web tiene un enlace a la resolución SB 623 con un ejemplar que puede usar para apoyarla. Las resoluciones presentadas en mayo tendrán un mayor impacto en la votación del Senado, pero las resoluciones recibidas en junio y julio seguirán siendo útiles a medida que el proyecto de ley llegue a la Asamblea. Si su consejo adopta una resolución, podemos ayudarle a enviar la resolución por usted, o proporcionarle la información para que lo pueda hacer usted mismo. ¡Por favor, comuníquese con el equipo de CWC si tiene preguntas o le gustaría saber de otras maneras para apoyar esta importante campaña para tener agua sana, segura y económica!


 


CWLN boletin de abril 2017

Resumen del taller de GSP

La Red Comunitaria de Líderes por el Agua organizó su primer taller el pasado 1o. de abril. En el evento, representantes de once diferentes comunidades que dependen delas aguas subterráneas en el Valle Central aprendieron sobre el proceso para desarrollar el Plan de Sostenibilidad de Aguas Subterráneas, un componente clave de la Ley de Manejo Sustentable de Aguas Subterráneas, conocido por sus siglas en inglés como SGMA.

Los Planes de Sostenibilidad de Aguas Subterráneas, que para la mayoría de las áreas en el Valle vencen en el año 2020, tendrán tres componentes centrales: 1) Descripción de la zona donde se efectuará y las condiciones actuales del agua subterránea, 2) Criterios de Sostenibilidad que establecen estándares mínimos y el manejo de una dirección objetiva de las cuencas del agua subterránea, y 3) Proyectos, manejo de las medidas y un plan de monitoreo para lograr la sostenibilidad.

Los que participaron en el taller de GSP practicaron los criterios para establecer la sostenibilidad en “resultados no deseables” o en impactos negativos por sobre bombear las aguas subterráneas regulados por la SMGA, y calcularon el vencimiento de la cuenca del agua subterránea utilizando los números del modelo de aguas subterráneas del Valle Central del Estado. También realizaron una lluvia de ideas para realizar preguntas a los consultores, y discutieron sobre cómo los modelos de las aguas subterráneas pueden y no pueden ayudarnos en el proceso de la SGMA.

¡Gracias a todos los que participaron y ayudaron a que el taller fuera un éxito! El taller tuvo tanto éxito, al grado de que estamos muy contentos en anunciar que estaremos organizando otro taller en el mes de junio para aquellos que no pudieron asistir en el primer taller. Se les dará a conocer la fecha tan pronto esté confirmada.


Tema de acción: Proyecto de Ley 623 del Senado – Creación de un Nuevo Fondo para el Agua Potable, Sana, y Económica.

Como varios miembros del CWLN saben bien, los pequeños sistemas de agua a menudo no pueden cumplir con los estándares de agua potable porque no pueden pagar el costo del tratamiento del agua potable. Si bien, las subvenciones federales y estatales están disponibles para ayudar a construir las instalaciones necesarias para el tratamiento del agua, actualmente no hay apoyo disponible para los costos de operación y mantenimiento en curso. Esto puede resultar en que el tratamiento no se instale en absoluto, o que en las comunidades eleven las tarifas del agua por encima de lo que los residentes pueden pagar para sostener el proyecto de tratar el agua potable.

Por años, la Mesa Estatal del Agua ha pedido la creación de una fuente de financiamiento sostenible para ayudar a llenar esta brecha y apoyar las necesidades de obtener un agua potable, sana, y económica en las comunidades más pequeñas de California. Este año, el Centro Comunitario por el Agua y otros defensores del agua potable han hecho que este fondo sea una prioridad absoluta – pero necesitamos de tu ayuda para tener éxito.

Estamos apoyando la Ley 623 del Senado (creada por el Senador Bill Monning), la cual establecería un nuevo Fondo para el Agua Potable, Sana, y Económica. El Fondo estaría autorizado para suministrar provisionalmente agua potable y para para financiar soluciones de agua potable a largo plazo, incluyendo los costos de O&M para las comunidades de bajos ingresos que necesitan el tratamiento de agua potable. El Fondo sería administrado por la Oficina de Soluciones Sustentables de Agua que pertenece a la Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua, y también podría ser usado para financiar el programa estatal para obtener agua potable a un bajo costo.

Como representante y poseedor de un pequeño sistema de agua, usted está en una posición única para hablar sobre la necesidad de una financiación sostenible. A continuación, le presentamos lo que usted puede hacer este mes para ayudarnos en apoyar la SB 623:

  1. Resoluciones de Apoyo – ¡Necesitamos resoluciones de apoyo para la SB 623 por parte de las Mesas sobre el Agua! Agende este tema para la próxima junta con su Mesa Directiva y pregunte a su comité si están dispuestos en apoyar la propuesta del Fondo de Agua Potable, Sana y Económica. Le puede dar un click a este enlace para que vea un ejemplo sobre la resolución de la SB 623 que puede usar. Para tener el mayor impacto posible en el proceso legislativo, las resoluciones son necesarias tenerlas listas para finales de mayo. Una vez que haya sido aprobado por su Mesa Directiva, podemos ayudarle a presentar la resolución por usted, o proporcionarle información para que usted mismo lo pueda hacer. Por favor, comuníquese con el equipo de CWC si usted tiene preguntas o si desea discutir en detalle este tema de acción.
  2. Cartas de apoyo de los miembros de la Mesa Directiva – Aunque las resoluciones formales de apoyo de las Mesas Directivas son más eficaces porque llevan el peso de su agencia pública, las cartas de apoyo de las personas son también influyentes, especialmente cuando vienen de parte de los líderes comunitarios que son miembros de la Mesa y son oficiales escolares. Si no tiene suficiente tiempo para obtener una resolución de su Mesa Directiva o su Comité no quiere tomar una posición formal, escribir una carta es una buena opción para mostrar su apoyo a la financiación de operaciones y mantenimiento. Aquí le mostramos un ejemplo de una carta de apoyo, o también puede escribir una carta propia. Una vez firmada la carta, le podemos ayudar a enviar la carta por usted, o le podemos proporcionar la información para que usted mismo lo haga. Por favor, comuníquese con el equipo de CWC si tiene preguntas o si desea discutir en detalle este tema.

Aparta el día: Mesa Redonda sobre el Acceso al Agua al alcance de todos, el 23 de mayo.

 Desde hace aproximadamente un año, la Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua ha estado trabajando en el desarrollo de un plan para crear un programa de asistencia que permita mantener el precio del agua bajo y asegurar que las familias de California no se vean obligadas en escoger entre pagar el agua u otras necesidades básicas. Ya existen algunos programas similares para la electricidad y las telecomunicaciones, y ahora es el momento para que el agua, siendo el servicio más fundamental que recibimos, sea añadida a esta lista. Entre este trabajo y la campaña legislativa para la asistencia con las operaciones y el mantenimiento en los pequeños sistemas, el acceso al agua para el alcance de todos es un tema muy importante en la actualidad. ¡Y es exactamente por esta razón que hemos decidido que en nuestra siguiente mesa redonda hablemos de este tema!

¡El 23 de mayo únase a nuestra mesa redonda de 6 a 8 pm en nuestra oficina de Visalia para discutir sobre el acceso al agua para el alcance de todos! Esta importante conversación (donde se ofrecerá cena) reunirá a los miembros de la mesa directiva de los distritos con agua potable, la gente del Ayuntamiento, y el personal de la Mesa Estatal del Agua, y tendrá la oportunidad para evaluar cómo se desarrollan estos esfuerzos y escuchar lo que otras comunidades del Valle ya están haciendo. Con emoción, seremos uno de los primeros en recibir información de la Mesa Estatal del Agua sobre el análisis que hicieron durante la primavera y el invierno, y sus recomendaciones de los resultados obtenidos mientras se preparan en organizar su próximo taller al público en junio sobre el proceso de la AB 401.

¡Invita a tus compañeros y miembros de la Mesa y el resto del equipo para asistir a nuestra Mesa Redonda! No van a querer perder esta importante discusión.


No te pierdas nuestra siguiente llamada informativa: el 27 de abril, de 4:00 a 5:00 pm.

Las llamadas informativas son conferencias telefónicas mensuales que permite a los miembros la oportunidad de conectarse unos con otros, realizar preguntas, y recibir información desde la comodidad de sus hogares. Para participar, simplemente marque (571) 317-3122, cuando se le solicite el código de acceso marque 611-041-917#. Presione la tecla # cuando se le solicite el Pin del audio. Comuníquese con Kristin si necesita una tarjeta prepagada para llamar de larga distancia.

Agenda:

  1. Actualizaciones y preguntas de los integrantes.
  2. Actualizaciones y preguntas del agua a nivel regional y estatal.
  3. Tema de discusión mensual: el estudio del agua DAC de la Cuenca del Lago de Tulare.

Próximos eventos:

  • 26 de abril, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm. Taller presencial de RCAC. Monitoreo y Calidad del Agua. Holiday Inn Express (9010 West Front Rd.) Atascadero, CA. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • 27 de abril, 8:30 am – 3:30 pm. Taller presencial de RCAC. Reportes sobre la Confianza del Consumidor. Holiday Inn Express (9010 West Front Rd.) Atascadero, CA. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • 2 de mayo, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm. Entrenamiento de RCAC en línea. Fundamentos de la Mesa : elaboración de un presupuesto. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • 16 de mayo, 9:00 am. Junta con la Mesa Estatal de Control de Recursos del Agua: Taller dirigido al público sobre la adopción de un proyecto de financiación sobre el agua potable para el programa de becas escolares. Para mayor información visite: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/grants_loans/ schools/
  • 23 de mayo, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm. Entrenamiento en línea de RCAC. Fundamentos de la Mesa: Planificación para mejorar el capital. Regístrese gratis en www.events.rcac.org
  • 24 de mayo, 10:00 – 12:00 pm. Entrenamiento en línea RCAC. Reportes sobre la Confianza del Consumidor. Regístrese en línea en www.events.rcac.org

Información mensual

¿Tienes preguntas sobre el agua subterránea? ¡La herramienta de Asistencia Técnica de la organización “Union of Concerned Scientists” nos puede ayudar! La herramienta tiene como objetivo proporcionar a los interesados, como usted, los recursos técnicos que necesitan para participar en el desarrollo de los Planes de Sostenibilidad de Aguas Subterráneas (conocido por sus siglas en inglés como GSPs). Las preguntas que envíen serán analizadas por un grupo de expertos del “Science Network” de la organización “Union of Concerned Scientists” (conocido por sus siglas en inglés como UCS) que tiene la adecuada experiencia para ayudarle a contestarlas. El “Science Network” es una comunidad de científicos, ingenieros, expertos en salud pública, y otros especialistas técnicos que quieren compartir sus habilidades con los que tienen el poder para tomar decisiones y el público en general. Un miembro de “Science Network” se comunicará con usted para darle una respuesta por vía telefónica o por correo electrónico, dependiendo de lo que usted prefiera. ¡Mientras más detalles le ofrezca al experto  sobre su duda, usted podrá recibir una respuesta más acertada!

Para enviar sus preguntas a los expertos de la organización “Union of Concerned Scientist” visite la siguiente liga: http://bit.ly/2nr4dww o llame al número de teléfono (510) 809-1573. Este es un programa piloto por lo que le agradeceremos nos hagan llegar sus sugerencias y comentarios para mejorar esta herramienta. Para cualquier sugerencia o pregunta póngase en contacto con Kate Cullen enviando un correo electrónico a kcullen@ucsusa.org o al número de teléfono mencionado anteriormente.


Gestión Regional de la Incorporación de Agua

¿Ha oído hablar de los Grupos de Planificación Regional Integrada por la Gestión del Agua (Integrated Regional Water Management Groups o conocidos por sus siglas en inglés como IRWMP)? Si no, usted no está solo. Aunque este programa de gestión del agua existe desde hace 15 años, mucha gente no sabe nada sobre el programa y aquellos que lo conocen siguen teniendo dudas sobre lo que hacen.

Entonces, ¿qué es exactamente IRWM?. Según el sitio web del Departamento de Recursos del Agua conocido por sus siglas en inglés (DWR), “la Planificación Regional Integrada por la Gestión del Agua (IRWM) es un esfuerzo en colaboración para identificar e implementar soluciones en la gestión del agua a escala regional y así aumentar la autosuficiencia a nivel regional, reducir los conflictos, y gestionar el agua para obtener los objetivos a nivel social, medioambiente y económico”. El programa IRWM dio inicio en el año 2002 cuando los legisladores estatales aprobaron la Ley Regional de Planificación sobre la Gestión del Agua (SB 1672), que tiene como objetivo incentivar la colaboración, la planificación multi-jurisdiccional y de grupos involucrados en el tema para la creación de los Planes Regionales en el Manejo de las Cuencas de Agua (IRWMP). Para incentivar a las personas en participar, el estado ha dirigido el dinero de los bonos de agua a disposición de los proyectos de IRWM que solicitan a través de los grupos locales. Desde su creación, $1.5 mil millones de los fondos han sido proporcionados a grupos locales con cuencas o IRWMs, convirtiéndose en una de las fuentes de financiamiento más grande del estado. La Propuesta Uno solo incluye $510 millones para IRWMs. Este programa de financiamiento es importante para dar a conocer el IRWM. Otra razón importante para da a conocer el IRWM es que otros programas estatales en ocasiones requieren que los proyectos sean parte de un plan local de IRWM para poder ser elegibles y recibir el financiamiento.

Como parte de la financiación de la Propuesta Uno del IRWN, también existe un programa específico para las comunidades en desventaja (DACs). La creación de la Planificación Regional Integrada por la Gestión del Agua (IRWM) ha alterado significativamente el enfoque de California para la gestión del agua. A pesar de que el programa ha aumentado debido a los esfuerzos de planificación y financiación, también ha habido continuos desafíos para involucrar y atender las necesidades de las Comunidades en Desventaja (DACs). En respuesta, la Propuesta 84 incluyó una disposición que requiere por lo menos el 10% del total de los fondos estatales para ser usados en los proyectos del DAC. Sin embargo, a pesar de la meta de financiación fijada, siguen existiendo barreras para que los proyectos de DAC sean presentados y financiados a través de IRWN, y aún quedan preguntas sobre cómo asegurar que los proyectos beneficien a las comunidades más vulnerables y abandonadas. Como tal, además de requerir del 10% para financiar proyectos de DAC, la Propuesta 1 incluye una disposición adicional que asigna el 10% de la financiación total de cada región para aumentar la participación de las DACs, de las Áreas Económicamente Desfavorecidas (EDAs), y de aquellas comunidades con escasa representación.

Hay muchos grupos de IRWN que se encuentran en el Valle Central, de los cuales la mayoría cuentan con cuencas de agua subterráneas similares y que están familiarizados con el SGMA (en el Valle Central la mayor parte del agua proviene de las aguas subterráneas por lo que tiene sentido relacionar nuestras cuencas que se encuentran en la superficie con las cuencas de aguas subterráneas). Cada grupo de IRWM está configurado de manera diferente, así que si está interesado en involucrarse lo que puede hacer es entrar en contacto con su grupo local. Usted puede encontrar una lista de contactos en el sitio web de DWR: http://www.water.ca.gov/irwm/grants/ o puede entrar en contacto con Kristin para obtener ayuda.


 

 


California Budget Takes Steps to Address State’s Drinking Water Crisis

 

Picture1.png 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 16, 2017

CONTACT:

Dawn Van Dyke, (916) 447-2854 x 1011, dvandyke@rcac.org
Jonathan Nelson, (530) 848-4460, Jonathan.Nelson@CommunityWaterCenter.org

Advocates say they will continue to push for sustainable statewide funding
 source including SB 623 (Monning)

Sacramento, Calif. -- Water justice advocates and environmental, health, rural and equity organizations thank the California Legislature for including emergency drinking water funds in the 2017-18 state budget to continue to chip away at California’s drinking water crisis. The $17 million allocated will address many immediate needs, but advocates urge the legislature to enact a long-term, sustainable funding source to meet the ongoing needs of the state’s water systems. 

The budget includes $8 million to the State Water Board program for emergency replacement of domestic wells and emergency connections to community water systems; $4 million to the Department of Water Resources for emergency relief and $5 million to the Department of Social Services for an Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) water benefit pilot program.

Drinking water advocates are especially grateful to Senator Ricardo Lara, Assemblymembers Richard Bloom and Dr. Joaquin Arambula for their leadership in securing this critical funding.

 “This is a critical step in maintaining a commitment to the vulnerable Californians most affected by the drought, and provides needed resources to continue work toward finding long term sustainable water solutions for them,” said Tom Collishaw, President/Chief Executive Officer, Self-Help Enterprises.

“The funds included in the state budget will ensure continued work to provide relief to the thousands of Californians still impacted by the worst drought in our state’s history, and those facing other water emergencies” said Stanley Keasling, Rural Community Assistance Corporation’s Chief Executive Officer.

“This important funding will help provide emergency drinking water solutions to those in urgent need” said Jonathan Nelson, Policy Director for the Community Water Center. “However, to truly deliver on the promise of the Human Right to Water, the Legislature needs to pass SB 623 (Monning with Principal Co-Author De Leon) this year in order to create a sustainable funding source that ensures all Californians have access to safe and affordable drinking water.” 

Hundreds of California communities are out of compliance with state and federal drinking water standards, and some communities have had arsenic flowing from their taps for more than a decade. The problem is particularly acute in rural, low-income communities throughout the state.

Studies have shown that adequate hydration is linked to students’ higher academic performance. Increased water consumption instead of sugar sweetened beverages like sodas, sports drinks, fruit drinks and flavored milks can help limit weight gain and prevent dental caries.

Despite Governor Brown’s official declaration ending California’s drought, in Central California alone, more than 1,000 residents remain without water. The funds included in this state budget will provide emergency relief including statewide well replacement, permanent connections to public systems, well abandonment and debt relief. 

"This budget also invests in an initiative to bring short-term relief to residents in poverty who have been living for years without safe drinking water, with supplemental CalFresh assistance. Struggling Californians can't afford to wait for long-term solutions. As we work towards sustainable infrastructure, this budget works to help those most in need." Tracey Patterson, Director of Legislation, California Food Policy Advocates.

"We're thrilled to see this continued commitment to safe, affordable and reliable drinking water and wastewater service. Communities that still can't access these fundamental services are fortunate to have champions in state government that are eager to tread alongside on their ongoing fight for the human right to water," said Phoebe Seaton, Co-Director, Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability.

While this budget represents progress, California drinking water advocates will continue to work toward a sustainable funding source to finance much needed water infrastructure improvements for the more than one million Californians who continue to struggle with unsafe or unreliable water. 

###

 


Increased Access to Funding for Drinking Water Projects in Severely Disadvantaged Communities is Adopted at State Board

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Debi Ores, (916)706-3346, Debi.Ores@CommunityWaterCenter.org  

 

Sacramento – This week, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) approved the 2017-2018 Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Intended Use Plan (DWSRF IUP).

The IUP continues the Board’s commitment to aiding water systems in need of assistance, in particular systems serving disadvantaged communities. The newly approved IUP creates a new designation of Expanded Small Community Water Systems for those that serve 10,000 – 20,000 residents or have between 3,300 and 6,600 service connections. These community systems are now eligible for principal forgiveness funding for up to 50% of their project costs. This will alleviate the financial burden facing already impoverished populations.

Community Water Center (CWC) has advocated for the State Water Board to allow severely disadvantaged communities larger than 10,000 residents to apply for grant funding for the last few years. The inability to receive grant funding creates huge issues for communities like Arvin, who are unable to afford the costs related to pure loan funding to remedy their drinking water problems. This year CWC worked with Assemblymember Salas to author a bill (AB 560) to require this increased funding access to larger SDACs.

“The action taken by the Water Board will bring relief to Arvin and other small communities throughout the Central Valley that have struggled to provide access to clean, affordable drinking water,” said Assemblymember Salas.  “I want to thank the Water Board, CWC and all the stakeholders that made this a reality." 

We thank Assemblymember Salas for his leadership in taking up the important cause of increased access to favorable financing options for some of the communities most in need of assistance in California. CWC is happy that due to Salas’ leadership and the SWRCB, larger SDACs will now have much-needed access to better funding options.

However, while this bill will help improve access for larger disadvantaged communities to receiving assistance for drinking water, California must take the next step of passing SB 623 (Monning), which will provide a new sustainable source of funding to meet longstanding gaps in drinking water funding. The DWSRF and other funding sources, like Prop 1, are limited pots of money reserved only for one-time costs, like capital infrastructure, leaving communities struggling to fund continued operations and maintenance without a funding source. SB 623 will help cover these funding gaps, furthering the goal of ensuring all Californian’s have access to safe, clean, and affordable drinking water.

###


June 2017 CWLN Newsletter

Water Rates and Affordability Roundtable Recap

On May 23, 2017 water board members/staff, Technical Assistance providers and the State Water Board gathered to discuss water affordability at our second Community Water Leaders Network Roundtable. 

We kicked-off the evening discussing SB 623, a bill that would provide sustainable funding for small water systems including help with Operations & Maintenance expenses. Community Water Center’s Policy Director Jonathan Nelson shared different ways local water systems can get involved in the effort including passing resolutions of support, sending letters, talking with their representatives and talking to media.

DSC_0175.JPG
Community Water Leaders Network members at the May roundtable on affordability.

For the rest of the evening we focused on AB 401. AB 401 is a law, passed in 201, that requires the State Water Resources Control Board to develop and submit a plan for a low-income rate assistance program for water to the legislature by early 2018. After a series of public workshops and an economic analysis performed by UCLA, Max Gomberg, Climate and Conservation Manager for the Water Board, reported that the Board was primarily considering three key program features 1) Eligibility: The number and type of households that will qualify 2) Household Benefit: The type and amount of benefit those qualified will receive and 3) The total program costs: Which equal the number of eligible households multiplied by the benefit level. Based on these program features, they have developed four scenarios for discussion purposes.

  1. Scenario 1 - All state households below 200% of the Federal Poverty Line receive a 20% discount on their water bills
  2. Scenario 2 - All State households below 200% of the Federal Poverty Line and paying less than $100 on their monthly water bill receive a 20% discount, households below 200% of the Federal Poverty Line paying $100 or more on their monthly water bill receive a 25% discount.
  3. Scenario 3 - All state households below 200% of the Federal Poverty Line who are not served by a Public Utilities Commission regulated water system with an existing affordability program, receive a 20% discount.
  4. Scenario 4 - All state households below 200% of the Federal Poverty Line who are served by a water system not currently offering a compliant affordability program are enrolled in a state program to receive a 20% discount.

In late June and July, the State Board will be conducting a second round of workshops similar to the one we received to get feedback on these four options. They will also be accepting comments on the four scenarios through the end of July. You can send written comments to Mary Yang at Mary.Yang@waterboards.ca.gov or call her at (916) 322-6507. Hopefully by the end of the year they will present a plan with recommendations to the legislature. At that point it will be up to lawmakers and the governor to decide if they would like move forward legislation on the topic.


Reduced Annual Fees for DAC Public Water Systems

On May 15, 2017 the State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water issued a letter to Community Public Water Systems informing them of the possibility of reducing their Annual Fee if the system serves a Disadvantaged Community (DAC).

If you qualify (the Median Household Income in your community is less than $49,454), the reduced fee for your water system will be based on the number of connections that you serve. Systems serving fewer than 100 connections will pay $100. Systems serving 15,000 connections or less will pay $100 plus $2 for each service connection greater than 100.

If you believe your water system is eligible and wish to receive a reduced Annual Fee, submit a request in the form of a signed letter and include information demonstrating that your community meets the definition of a Disadvantaged Community, the DDW will respond.

You can find the letter they sent here. If you have any questions, contact your District Engineer.


Resource of the Month - Legal Technical Assistance from UC Davis’ Water Justice Clinic

Recently, the U.C. Davis Martin Luther King Jr. School of Law launched a Water Justice legal clinic designed to advocate for clean, healthy and adequate water supplies for all Californians. The director of the clinic, Camille Pannu, may be familiar to some Valley Water Leaders, as she used to work on environmental justice cases as a legal fellow for the Center on Race, Poverty & the Environment in Delano.

Through the Proposition 1 water bond, the Water Justice Clinic received a three-year grant from the State Water Resources Control Board Office of Sustainable Water Solutions to provide legal services. Indeed, the Clinic is the primary legal services provider among the organizations funded by Proposition 1 Technical Assistance grants.

To receive help from the clinic a Technical Assistance request needs to be made to the State Water Board. This can be done by another Technical Assistance provider, if you are already working with one. This can also be done directly by working with Camille. One important restriction to keep in mind, is that to be eligible for these services, the proposed legal work needs to be related to a future or current capital improvement project in your community.


Don’t Miss our Next Network Briefing: June 22, 4-5 PM

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. We changed service providers which means starting this month, we have a new conference call phone number and passcode. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Kristin know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.

Agenda:

        1.   Member updates and questions

        2.   Regional and state updates and questions

        3.   Monthly discussion topic: Annual reports/CCRs, AB 401 input


Upcoming Events and Trainings: 

Find more events on our Community Water Leaders online calendar found at http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


Mid-Session Legislative Update 

We are more than half-way through this legislative session and many of the water bills that we have been following are still alive and making their way through the lawmaking process. Here is the latest on some key bills that could, if passed, impact local water systems: 

SB 623 (Monning): SB 623, which would establish a new Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund to be housed at the State Water Resources Control Board, passed out of the Senate at the end of May. The bill will now move to the Assembly for consideration. The Fund, once implemented, would be used to meet long-standing gaps in funding such as operation and maintenance costs that have prevented so many communities from being able to provide reliable safe drinking water to their constituents.

AB 560 (Salas): AB 560 is intended to formalize the State Water Resources Control Board’s authority to provide water systems serving SDACs principal forgiveness/grants and 0% financing for water projects through Drinking Water State Revolving Fund if paying back loans would increase water rates to unaffordable levels. A few months ago the draft Intended Use Plan for the fund was released and it included most of the changes proposed by AB 560. It is unclear if after the formal adoption of the IUP, this bill will be dropped by the author or not. 

SB 427 (Leyva): SB 427 would require a public water system to provide a timeline for replacement of known lead user service lines in its distribution system to the State Water Board by July 1, 2020. This bill moves on to Assembly Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials Committee next. 

AB 277 (Mathis): AB 27 would establish the Water and Wastewater Loan and Grant Fund to allow counties and nonprofits to provide low-interest loans and grants to eligible applicants for drinking water needs and wastewater treatment while still having centralized oversight from the State Water Resources Control Board. This bill will be heard next in the Senate Environmental Quality Committee. 

SB 252 (Dodd): SB 252 creates additional requirements on people applying to drill new wells (not replacement wells or domestic wells) within critically overdrafted basins such as requiring neighbors to be notified, requiring public hearings, and requiring a public comment period. This bill is heading next to Water, Parks, and Wildlife Committee, as well as to the Local Government committee and will likely face some steep opposition ahead.


Submit your Application to Join the Project Advisory Committee (PAC) for the Tulare Lake Basin Disadvantaged Community Involvement Project

The Tulare Lake Basin Disadvantaged Community Involvement Project is a $3.4 million grant-funded effort that aims to support the long-term water planning needs and improve the participation of Disadvantaged Communities (DACs) in Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) in Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern Counties. The Project is funded by the Department of Water Resources (DWR) through the Proposition 1 Disadvantaged Community Involvement Program and will be administered locally by the County of Tulare. 

IRWM planning, as you probably remember, is a statewide voluntary water planning effort that seeks to incentivize regional collaboration between local agencies in order to promote regional water management and the implementation of multi-benefit projects. The Department of Water Resources is responsible for administering the IRWM program and awards certain state funds only to IRWM groups.

The Tulare Lake Basin Disadvantaged Community Involvement project will fund the following activities:

  • Needs Assessment of all communities within the TLB area. The needs assessment will include an evaluation of the community characteristics, drinking water, wastewater, stormwater and other water related needs.
  • Project Development, to help communities develop shovel-ready projects that will be competitive to receive planning or construction funding, e.g. engineering, environmental documents, application preparation and more.
  • DAC Engagement and Education Program. Possible activities include community meetings, training workshops and educational tours/field trips. 
  • Project Administration and Reporting Tasks

Additionally, the project will fund third-party facilitation for a Project Advisory Committee (PAC). The PAC will be a diverse stakeholder group of IRWM, DAC and Tribal representatives. The role of the PAC is to oversee the project, guide the project team, and make key decisions during the implementation of the program. PAC members will help ensure this project is successful be developing program guidelines, identifying common water needs within the region and opportunities to develop multi-benefit and regional projects/solutions and reviewing and ranking proposals for project development. 

The Tulare Lake Basin Disadvantaged Community Involvement project creates a unique opportunity to meet the long-term water planning needs, and improve the participation of Disadvantaged Communities (DACs) in Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM). We need DAC representatives like you to participate on the PAC in order to ensure the project is successful! If you are interested in applying to serve on the PAC, talk to your local IRWM group or contact Community Water Center or Self-Help Enterprises. 



Do you have any questions about this newsletter or the Community Water Leaders Network? 
Contact Kristin Dobbin at 559-733-0219 or kristin.dobbin@communitywatercenter.org.


Governor's Revised Budget Does Not Adequately Address Drinking Water Crisis Affecting One Million Californians

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Jenny Rempel, (559) 284-6327 (cell), Jenny.Rempel@CommunityWaterCenter.org  

Dawn Van Dyke, (916) 447-2854 x 1011, dvandyke@rcac.org

Matt Davis, (510) 717-1617 (cell), mattdavis@cleanwater.org

Advocates Say Administration and Legislature Must Create a Sustainable Funding Source to Guarantee Safe Water

Sacramento, CA | May 12, 2017 -- Water justice advocates and environmental, health, rural, and equity organizations were dismayed that the Governor’s revised budget does not go far enough to address the state’s drinking water crisis. Almost five years after the Governor signed into law the Human Right to Water, 300 communities and one million Californians – far more than the population of Flint, Michigan – still lack this basic human right.

The Governor’s January Budget stated, “Although much progress has been made, some disadvantaged communities rely on contaminated groundwater and lack the resources to operate and maintain their water systems to deliver safe and affordable water. The Administration is committed to working with the Legislature and stakeholders to address this issue.”

“California has been a leader on drinking water, but we have to commit sustained funding if we want to solve the crisis this year,” said Laurel Firestone, Co-Executive Director of Community Water Center.

The State Water Resources Control Board released data in February indicating that hundreds of California communities are not able to finance long-overdue drinking water solutions. Some communities have had arsenic flowing from their taps for over a decade.

“Safe drinking water has been a priority for this administration, but it's still not adequately addressed in the budget that just came out,” said Jennifer Clary, Water Programs Manager at Clean Water Action California.

Arsenic, nitrate, and disinfectant byproducts are the most commonly occurring contaminants. Drinking water with these contaminants can cause rashes, miscarriages, and even cancer.

“The Governor’s Administration has prioritized the issue in the past, and now is the year for the administration and the legislature to invest in a lasting funding solution to ensure every Californian has safe and affordable drinking water,” said Phoebe Seaton, Co-Executive Director of Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability.

“We need to double down our efforts to provide clean drinking water to children and contribute to their overall health and wellbeing,” said Kula Koenig, Government Relations Director, American Heart Association.

Funding for drought solutions remained at $5 million. However, even with the Governor’s recent declaration ending the state’s five year drought, advocates say this amount is not sufficient to meet many residents’ needs, primarily in small, low-income communities. In Central California alone, more than 1,000 residents are still without water. More funds are needed for emergency relief including statewide well replacement, permanent connections to public systems, well abandonment and debt relief.

“We appreciate that the Governor allocated modest funds for emergency relief. However, too many vulnerable Californians are still without access to drinking water,” said Stanley Keasling, RCAC’s chief executive officer. “For these residents, long-term drought impacts continue. Additional funding is critical to alleviating their suffering.”

“We are pleased that the Governor sees the need to address the lingering impacts of the drought on families who are still without running water at home,” said Tom Collishaw, Self-Help Enterprises’ President/Chief Executive Officer. “But having arsenic, nitrate or pesticides flowing from your tap is equally an emergency. We need state leaders to create a sustainable funding source this year to guarantee every Californian safe water.”

###

 


published Sonia Saini in Our Team 2017-05-17 11:43:15 -0700

Sonia Saini

soniaphoto.JPG

Policy Analyst

Sonia joined Community Water Center in 2017 as a Policy Analyst and is primarily responsible for coordinating and implementing community-driven policy campaigns. She grew up in the Sacramento area. After studying at UC Davis, Sonia worked with Sacramento County on its Climate Action Plan before moving to Washington, D.C. to pursue a master’s degree in Global Environmental Policy.

After graduating, she interned with World Resources Institute and worked for the federal government and for an international land rights coalition before returning to California. Sonia has studied, worked, and/or conducted research in Mexico, Cuba, and Colombia. She enjoys reading, traveling, and cuddling with cats. 


published Lamont in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:16:15 -0700

Lamont

24961252576_4f37fe99fe_o-2.jpg

Miguel Sanchez has lived in Lamont, a small town in Kern County for over 40 years. Lamont is approximately 4.6 square miles, but only .65% of that land is water. There are 7 wells in lamont, but 1 has excessive arsenic and many others have 123 TCP well over the notification limit. 123 TCP is a contaminate derived from soil pesticides that were used in the 1950s that still persist in the soil.

“As a business man in Lamont, this community has been great to me and other businesses,” Miguel said. Miguel has served in many Lamont community organizations, including the Lamont Public Utility District, the Lamont School District, Lamont Parks & Recreation, Lamon Storm Water Districts, and the Local Chamber. “I really enjoy our community members, they are wonderful. I would like to help our community grow more,” he says. Miguel says that Lamont is too small to be an officially independent city, and thus Lamont has to adhere to local supervisors for major decisions instead of relying on local community members, who are the people actually impacted.

Miguel believes that other barriers to water security in Lamont include inadequate informational notices. “The community needs more information about water to better comprehend what the state standards mean." These notices can be hard to understand, especially for many residents of Lamont who don’t speak English as a first language. Additionally, Miguel thinks that Lamont should invest in new water infrastructure. “Our infrastructure is old and so are our wells; in being proactive I’d like our community to have the existing infrastructure replaced.” He would also like safe water filters installed on taps to help remove pollutants. “I like the filters installed throughout the community and would like to continue programs such as those and help secure funds to maintain them,” he said.

Some of these goals are currently in progress. Lamont recently received a grant to construct a new well. Construction was completed in spring 2016. CWC has helped to ensure that the new wells are blended to ensure that all of the population of Lamont is serviced and has access to the new wells, and that the water from the new wells is safe.

 


published West Goshen in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:15:52 -0700

West Goshen

West_Goshen.jpg

West Goshen is a very small unincorporated community located just east of Visalia in Tulare County. It is home to approximately 500 people, the majority of which are low-income Latinos, and its economy is supported primarily by agriculture and dairies.

West Goshen has not had access to safe drinking water for at least 4 years. There have been ongoing nitrate and bacteria contamination, and “no-drink” orders have been in place since 2013. To make matters worse, West Goshen’s wells began failing in early 2012. The main well collapsed in 2012, forcing the West Goshen Water District to switch to a backup well. California’s continuing drought conditions worsened West Goshen’s situation, and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) identified West Goshen as being in immediate danger of acute drinking water shortages. CDPH provided $250,000 in emergency funding to replace the failing well pump and providing temporary bottled drinking water. Within a month of being granted this emergency funding, a 350-foot-section of the backup system’s water pipe collapsed and residents of West Goshen were without any water for several days. Due to well damage, pumps began to suck in sand, which ruined the pumps for both wells and clogged the main water lines to homes and even flowed out of some taps. Residents were forced to travel to nearby towns to take showers, brush their teeth, cook, and drink.

CWC has been helping West Goshen plan a new well and connect with Visalia’s water service. In March 2014, West Goshen was granted $3 million from the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund to replace its distribution system, install water meters and build an interconnection with the California Water Service Company (CalWater) in Visalia. The consolidation of water service with Visalia will relieve West Goshen of drought-related problems as well as address some of its ongoing water quality issues.

 


published East Porterville in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:14:36 -0700

East Porterville

East_Porterville.jpg


Tomas Garcia, a resident of East Porterville for over 30 years, has been a water justice advocate since the drought began to affect his community’s water supply. “I started having trouble with my well,” he said. “I thought it was going to be a very simple deal to fix the situation but it was a very complicated situation.” Since then, Tomas has worked with CWC to organize East Porterville for Water Justice (EPWJ), a community based organization made up of impacted residents working for water solutions.  “I like to help my community. What I do, I do for my family,” he said.

The drought disproportionately affects residents of East Porterville because East Porterville is an unincorporated community of approximately 7,500 residents, many of whom are low-income Latinos, that relies on groundwater from private wells. As many as 300 wells went dry during the hot summer months of 2014, and many others are contaminated with nitrate pollutants. At least 1800 homes in East Porterville are not connected to city water, and those that are still face the problem of contamination. “A lot of people in my community don’t want to speak and let people know they are suffering,” Tomas said. “When you come home from work (after) 10 hours and there’s not water, it’s very hard.”

CWC helped Tomas get bottled water and a tank installed to serve his home. “(CWC) helped me have more time with my family.” Tomas has two young daughters in elementary and middle school, and he worries about their access to water. The school has running water, but he is concerned about potential pollution. “At school the kids get city water. I don’t know how good the water is for drinking,” he says, “It’s better they have bottled water.”

The city of Porterville and private residents began providing the community emergency drinking water supplies in the fall of 2014. The Porterville Area Coordinating Council (PACC) provided residents with 275-gallon water tanks, and the City of Porterville has funded refilling these tanks. The city of Porterville would like to connect East Porterville to their water system and has installed lines in some areas, but additional funding and capacity is required to solve this problem.

 


published Ducor in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:14:11 -0700

Ducor

29717117811_1ac0be8d0d_o.jpg

Ducor, a small town of approximately 800 people, has had severe water injustice problems for many years, and these problems were exacerbated during the drought. Ruth Martinez lived in Ducor for the past 40 years, "Little kids were getting rashes from showering, and mothers were complaining that their kids were getting sick. [There were] lots of complaints from everyone, kidney problems [were reported]...” she said. The residents of Ducor had been aware that there was contamination in the water, and these health symptoms made it obvious. Furthermore, water from the tap smelled terrible due to high levels of poisonous arsenic contamination. The drought caused even more problems and reduced water access. "We had no water pressure and they didn't want us to flush our toilets or wash our dishes at a certain time." Kids were not permitted to flush toilets at school, which was dirty and not sanitary. Residents of Ducor were forced to spend enormous amounts of money on water. Every month, Ruth said she spent $65 on her water bill and an additional $100 on bottled water for drinking. Her neighbors all had the same problems, but not all of them could speak english so it was difficult for them to speak up.

Ruth began to organize. She held meetings at her house, and worked with organizations like AGUA and CWC to confront water injustice. She became a member of community water board in Ducor. "We had go to Sacramento and Tulare/Visalia county offices before they would take care of the problem." Due to this strong community organizing, Ducor has had many successes. "The elementary school across from the orange grove was being sprayed with pesticides,” Ruth said. “We prevented them from spraying pesticides and created an agricultural barrier." Additionally, the community got a loan from Self Help Enterprises and was able to use the money to drill a new well to serve Ducor’s needs. In February 2016, Ruth received a recognition award in Sacramento from CWC. "All of Ducor has problems with contaminated water, I foresee with a lot of petitions and help from the communities we can eventually say, ‘Hey no more contaminated water!’ Water is not a privilege and we have a right to clean water. It's something we all strive for everyday," Ruth says.

 


published Cutler in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:13:35 -0700

Cutler

29717123861_fc13e94909_o.jpg

Cutler is an unincorporated community of approximately 5,000 people, nearly all of whom are farmworker families, located in Tulare County. Access to drinking water has been a challenge since at least 2014, and contamination has been an ongoing issue. Residents of Cutler are served contaminated groundwater with levels of the pesticide DBCP and nitrates over the federal health standards. The Cutler Public Utility Distric (CPUD) backup well is contaminated, but is still used as a supplementary source of drinking water when water levels in the primary well are too low, often during the summer. 

Jesus Quedevo has lived in Cutler for the past 46 years. He recently had to retire from farmwork in order to take care of his ill wife, and this motivated him to help his community through volunteering. Jesus has been involved in water justice movements and community development organizations, and has helped create positive change in Cutler.

Jesus is especially passionate about clean water in schools, which helps to improve equitable access to education. “My major goal is for all students to get an education… I have a lot of grandchildren in the (school) district… and through continuous communication and collaboration we've received grants to provide drinking water at our local high school.” He has also achieved other water successes in the community. “For the past 10 years, (we have been) working with CWC to access clean drinking water and Proper Notice.” These notices alert community members, in multiple languages, when water is contaminated by pollutants. Previously, community members weren’t adequately notified of contamination in water, or how to effectively respond to the contamination. For example, there are some pollutants, like nitrates, that become more toxic when they are boiled, and these notifications now explain these nuances. In addition, Jesus organized with the community to help conserve water, and Cutler successfully reduced their water consumption by 29%.  

Cutler has had trouble finding a source of groundwater that is uncontaminated, so they must use surface water supplies. The nearby Alta Irrigation District is considering building a plant to treat surface water from the Friant-Kern Canal. This water would supplement the drinking water of Cutler and other neighboring communities. Jesus has also been working with the North Tulare County Governance Study project to improve water access. “We are working towards the goals to improve our drinking waters, and be able to trust and drink our water… If we continue to participate and don't forget about the goal of accessing clean drinking water, we'll reach our goal,” he hopes. “Our community successes are not because of me. I've only been part of the successes gained.”


published Monson in Where We Work 2017-04-21 11:13:12 -0700

Monson

Monson.jpg
Tony Torres, 71 stands near his well. He was the first Monson resident to receive a water filtration system in his home, making it safe to drink the water that comes out of his tap. (Credit: Blue Planet Network, storiesofwater.org)

Monson is a small unincorporated community that struggles with securing a safe supply of drinking water. It is a primarily Latino community in Tulare County, located just a few miles from other small communities such as Sultana and the larger city of Dinuba. Surrounded by agriculture fields and dairies, the community is home to approximately 200 people, many of whom live below the poverty line. It is not connected to a Community Services District (CSD), and instead residents are served by individual private wells with some of the most contaminated water in Tulare County.

Monson has been without clean water for at least 9 years, and possibly longer. The first tests confirming this suspected contamination discovered many wells with nitrate levels that exceeded the federal health standard by as much as 300%. Several wells also contain bacteria and 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), a pesticide that was banned in the 1970s but persists in the soil and groundwater. These contaminants cause serious health risks. For example, ingestion of nitrate-contaminated water is extremely harmful to human health and has been linked to methemoglobinemia, or “Baby Blue Syndrome,” and a range of serious gastrointestinal and endocrine system illnesses.

Without a central water provider, Monson residents face significant barriers to obtaining the information and resources they need to solve their drinking water challenges. In 2013, CWC worked with a number of community members to install filters as an interim solution to have safe water in their homes. For more information on this, see Logan’s Story.

With the help of Tulare County and the neighboring community of Sultana, Monson is currently seeking planning funds from California State Water Board and the USDA to evaluate possible solutions, including the consolidating with Sultana and drilling new wells that would serve both communities in a singular Sultana-Monson Community Services District (CSD). 


1  2  3  Next →

Donate on behalf of Kelsey Hinton: