Community Water Center

Community-driven water solutions through organizing, education, and advocacy
Pages tagged "AGUA"

Community Power and Engaged Leadership Program

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The Problem:

Decision-makers are not prioritizing community drinking water needs.

Goals:

  • Support and grow a diverse network of local water decision-makers who prioritize and effectively address community drinking water needs. 

  • Engage at least 10,000 local low-prosperity voters (particularly Latinos, women, low-income residents and people of color) around local water issues. 

  • Expand the AGUA Coalition, a coalition of impacted community residents participating in decision-makers who prioritize and effectively address community drinking water needs.

Related Campaigns and Projects: 

AGUA Coalition: AGUA is a regional grassroots coalition of impacted community residents and allied non-profit organizations dedicated to securing safe, clean, and affordable drinking water for the San Joaquin Valley. AGUA was formed in 2006 in response to widespread contamination of valley drinking water sources, recognizing the need for a united voice of impacted communities to advocate for action by responsible agencies.

Community Water Leaders Network: The Community Water Leaders Network is a leadership cohort that unites local board members to increase access to safe, clean and affordable drinking water in the San Joaquin Valley through information sharing and capacity building.

For most recent news stories check out our Water Blog, or the related articles columns on the right.

To join us in our mission: 

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Questions? Contact: 

Jonathan Nelson (TCP): (916) 706-3346 or jonathan.nelson@communitywatercenter.org
Susana De Anda (Agua Coalition): (559) 733-0219 or susana.deanda@communitywatercenter.org
Adriana Renteria (Community Water Leaders Network)

AGUA and CWC Host Federal EPA Officials

Last month, the AGUA Coalition and CWC hosted federal officials from the US EPA’s Office of Water to share their experiences and expertise as the federal agency develops its National Action Plan for Safe Drinking Water. 29 community leaders from the San Joaquin Valley held a roundtable discussion with federal EPA Office of Water administrators, as well as administrators at EPA Region 9 and the State Water Board.

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The participants shared powerful testimony about the need for better enforcement and funding to ensure that small, low-income communities have safe water. Individuals shared stories of receiving conflicting notices about water safety. For instance, Seville residents had recently received a boil water notice that said to boil water to address bacterial contamination, but not to serve boiled water to infants because it might have high nitrate levels. These confusing messages, which left older residents wondering why their health wasn’t of concern with nitrates, which can cause cancer through long-term consumption. Fresno residents shared that their annual Consumer Confidence Report, which explains water quality data, required residents to look online for the results and did not make the Spanish-language version easy to access online. Residents of Arvin explained that although they live in a low-income community, they have had great difficulty accessing adequate funding to finance a water treatment facility, which means residents have been dealing with arsenic-contaminated water for over 10 years. Many residents from drought-impacted communities shared stories of the extreme hardship of living without any running water. They expressed that federal funding needs to be made available for low-income communities which have never had centralized infrastructure to secure safe and affordable water, often through consolidations and interties.

Following the roundtable, federal and state officials visited Seville and East Porterville to learn more about the situation in communities impacted by water quality and supply challenges. The visits made visible the need for better coordination and communication between agencies and the public with regards to issues of water supply and reliability.


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