Community Water Center

Community-driven water solutions through organizing, education, and advocacy
Pages tagged "CWLN"

September 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing:
Thursday, September 27th from 4-5PM  

As a reminder, our next call is on September 27th. Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a prepaid calling card in order to call long-distance.

 


Community Water Center is hiring a Community Organizer for our new Central Coast Office

 

Community Organizer— The Community Organizer position is a regular, full-time, exempt employee position that will be primarily responsible for conducting CWC’s organizing and base-building work in communities in the Northern Central Coast Region (primarily Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Benito counties and parts of Santa Clara County). This position will report directly to the CWC Director of Organizing, Erica Fernandez Zamora and will work closely with other CWC staff, community partners and allies. If you have any questions, please contact Erica Fernandez at erica.fernandez@communitywatercenter.org.

 

If you or someone you know is interested in applying, visit our website to access the application: https://www.communitywatercenter.org/careers.

 


Save the date for Somos el Poder y el Cambio—  We are the Power and the Change!

WHEN: October 11, 2018 at 5:30pm

WHERE: Café 210  210 W Center Ave, Visalia, CA 93291

 


SGMA Workshop Series:

Save the dates for two upcoming SGMA workshops! The Community Water Center, the Union of Concerned Scientists, Self Help Enterprises, and Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability will be hosting two workshops on groundwater management in October. These workshops are being funded through a Department of Water Resources (DWR) SGMA grant. More information on these special events below:

 


Groundwater Quality in the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) CWLN Roundtable

DATE: Wednesday, October 10th, 2018

TIME: 5:00PM--7:30PM

LOCATION: Cafe 210, 210 W. Center Ave. (corner of Center and Locust), Visalia, CA 93291

 

Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) are currently developing plans, Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs), that will outline how groundwater resources will be managed locally. As part of developing their plans, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) requires GSAs to address how they will avoid six undesirable results.  This roundtable will focus on the undesirable result of the “significant and unreasonable degradation of groundwater quality.”

 

At this roundtable, state representatives will speak on how regulatory programs like SGMA and CV SALTS are interconnected and how GSAs can develop robust plans that complement other regulatory frameworks. Researchers will be sharing information about how groundwater pumping and groundwater recharge influence the geochemistry of the aquifer, changes in groundwater quality, and recommendations for GSAs how to proactively plan or address these concerns. And lastly, representatives from local water districts will be sharing the groundwater quality remediation projects their water district is implementing. We hope to see you join our conversation!

 

Groundwater Sustainability Planning Workshop 2.0

DATE: Saturday, October 27th, 2018

TIME: 10AM— 3PM

LOCATION: Marriott Hotel, 300 South Court, Visalia CA 93291

 

This workshop on October 27th is a continuation of the Groundwater Sustainability Planning workshops that CWLN hosted in 2017. This half-day workshop, will feature a series of presentations and interactive  exercises that will help participants better understand and engage in the creation of Groundwater Sustainability Plans. The topics will focus on understanding water budgets, developing sustainability criteria, and management actions and projects. The details on the time and location are still being finalized so in the meantime, please place a save the date on your calendar.

 

If you have any questions about these two workshops, please contact Adriana Renteria at adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org or 559-733-0219.

 


Update on the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund

After almost two years of advocacy, five days of water strikes at the Capitol, multiple legislative visits, and loud, passionate calls for government accountability, the legislative session ended without the passage of a critical two-bill package to fund safe and affordable drinking water.

 

Unfortunately, political self-interest trumped addressing a decades-old public health crisis impacting more than one million Californians. Concerned about potential election year fallout, the State Assembly shelved our bills for this session. This outcome is an outrage to those who will have to go another year living with toxic taps. Even though justice has been delayed, justice will not be denied. Due to the courageous, steadfast and skillful advocacy by impacted residents, Speaker Rendon issued a public statement committing to making ongoing, sustainable funding a priority for the legislature when they reconvene in January. As saddened and angry as we are in the face of this delay of justice to serve nearsighted political interests, CWC, our community partners, and allies will not be stopped from aggressively seeking a solution to California's drinking water crisis when the legislature reconvenes in January.

 

Also, this month, we are launching the Community Water Center Action Fund, a 501(c)(4) organization which can participate directly in partisan election-related activities. This November, CWC Action Fund will be endorsing candidates who will be accountable to their communities’ drinking water needs and speaking with thousands of Latino voters to ensure they make their voices heard. Help us build community-based power leading up to November by joining our email list and following us on Facebook and Twitter. As impacted residents made clear last week at the Capitol: the people united will never be divided. Join us this fall as we hold our elected officials accountable and make sure the Human Right to Water remains a priority.

 


Yes on Prop 3- the November Water Bond

Community Water Center supports and has endorsed Proposition 3, the California Water Bond on the November, 2018 ballot. Proposition 3, the Water Supply and Water Quality Act of 2018, is an $8.877 billion water bond organized through a citizen’s initiative for the November, 2018 ballot. Proposition 3 would provide funding for important water projects across the state, including in the Central Valley. Funding would go to a variety of projects such as for safe drinking water, groundwater, wastewater, conservation, and watershed restoration. Proposition 3 would provide a total of $750 million for safe drinking water and wastewater projects, and $675 million for groundwater projects. Proposition 3 would provide desperately needed funding for safe drinking water projects across the state to help ensure universal access to safe drinking water.

 

Community Water Center helped write the language in Proposition 3 for the safe drinking water, wastewater and groundwater sections. Proposition 3 is unique in that it provides a historically large level of funding for safe drinking water needs, and a larger than usual amount of the funding is designed to directly benefit low income communities. The historic amount of capital funding in Proposition 3, if combined with passage of a future Safe and Affordable Drinking Water fund to provide complimentary funding for ongoing operations and maintenance, will allow California to take a major step forward towards finally securing every Californian’s basic human right to water. For more information, please visit: Waterbond.org


Update on the Department of Water Resources’ Small Rural Water Systems Drought Contingency Planning Process

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) is starting to move forward with their process to implement the conservation bills (AB 1668/SB 606) that implements portions of the Governor's conservation Executive Order. Community Water Center supported those bills and was able to include language in AB 1668, which passed early this year, that calls on DWR to develop guidelines and resources to strengthen local drought resiliency by proactively planning for and addressing vulnerability to water shortages. You can read a comment letter submitted this month by the Community Water Center and a number of other organizations. Yale University also prepared a list of recommendations dealing with drought and water supply vulnerability that is worth checking out -- see here for more information. If you are interested in learning more about DWR’s Small Rural Water Systems Drought Contingency Planning Process, please contact CWC’s Policy Director Jonathan Nelson at jonathan.nelson@communitywatercenter.org.

 


Draft Proposal Solicitation Package (PSP) for the Integrated Regional Water Management Implementation Funding to be released this month

The Proposition 1 IRWM Grant Program, administered by DWR, provides funding for projects that help meet the long-term water needs of the state. Some of these types of projects include: assisting water infrastructure systems adapt to climate change; providing incentives to collaborate in managing the region's water resources; and setting regional priorities for water infrastructure.

 

The IRWM Grant Program includes funding for IRWM Planning, IRWM Implementation, and Disadvantaged Community Involvement Grant Programs. The draft Proposal Solicitation Package for the Prop 1 IRWM Implementation grant is anticipated to be released in late September. After the draft is released, the Department of Water Resources will be hosting a series of public workshops to receive comments and then the final PSP is anticipated to be ready late fall of this year. There are two round of funding available. The first round will be open in the fall when the PSP is released and they will grant the first application in early Spring 2019. The second round of funding application will begin in 2020. DWR will also be setting aside $3.4M for DAC-benefit projects which would make available $1,020,000 in Round 1 and $2,380,000 in Round 2. If you’d like to stay up to date on the progress of this program, visit: https://water.ca.gov/Work-With-Us/Grants-And-Loans/IRWM-Grant-Programs/Proposition-1.

 


Tulare-Kern Funding Area Integrated Regional Water Management Disadvantaged Community Involvement Grant Project Advisory Committee

The Tulare-Kern Funding area met last month to discuss updates on the Involvement Grant Project. As part of this project, the Tulare-Kern IRWM funding area is contracting with Self Help Enterprises to support outreach to disadvantaged communities. The first phase of SHE’s work will entail developing a survey to capture a summary of all the DAC participation efforts currently taking place. From the results of this survey they will then tailor their outreach efforts accordingly. The other thing that was discussed at the August meeting was the needs assessment that is being developed by Provost & Pritchard for this project. They are working to develop a web tool that will help inform projects for the IRWM group. For more updates on this project, visit: http://www.kingsbasinauthority.org/projects-funding/ongoing-projects/prop-1-irwm-dac-involvement-grant/




Recently released reports:

 

Environmental Defense Fund: Groundwater Pumping Allocations under California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act: Guidance for Groundwater Sustainability Agencies

This paper, co-authored with New Current Water and Land, addresses one major dilemma facing Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs): how to comply with SGMA without changing groundwater rights. It starts by providing background on groundwater law and then recommends one approach among four to develop an allocation scheme that is most likely to withstand a court challenge. The four methods of groundwater allocation that are explained in this report are:

1) Allocating equally per overlying acre. This approach divides available groundwater proportional to property size. One problem is that it can be viewed as creating inequities for those who have invested heavily to exercise their groundwater rights.

2) Allocation per irrigated overlying acre. This approach allocates each irrigated acre a specific quantity of groundwater. It’s relatively simple to calculate, but one downside is that it does not consider unexercised pumping rights.

3) Allocation based on fraction of historic pumping. This approach allocates water based on historic groundwater use. This can reduce conflict among existing groundwater pumpers. But one potential major challenge is it requires data about individuals’ historic use that may not exist.

4) Comprehensive allocation method (method recommended by the Environmental Defense Fund). This approach allocates groundwater based on California groundwater law to the extent practical and preserves the relative priority of water users. In this paper they argue that this method is more likely to survive judicial scrutiny if tested in court. However, it may be more complicated and time-consuming to apply and would require substantial stakeholder engagement. You can read both the blog and the report here:

Blog post: http://blogs.edf.org/growingreturns/2018/09/04/groundwater-managers-sgma-compliance/

Paper: https://www.edf.org/content/groundwater-pumping-allocations-under-californias-sustainable-groundwater-management-act

Environmental Defense Fund: Depletion Requirements in California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

In this paper, Environmental Defense Fund proposes an approach for GSAs to address surface water depletions – also known as the “sixth deadly sin” or “Undesirable Result No. 6” – under SGMA. As part of this report, EDF identifies three key principles to consider:

1) Use groundwater levels as an indicator of stream depletion. Accurately measuring the amount of water withdrawn from a stream by groundwater pumping is extremely difficult. If groundwater managers select groundwater levels in the vicinity of a stream and then manage the groundwater to keep levels above those thresholds, it’s as good as – and much more practical than – trying to measure and maintain the actual amount of stream depletion.

2. Use the best available information. Where we have good groundwater level monitoring data, this is straightforward. But in many, if not most cases, we don’t really know what groundwater levels were in the years before the law’s passage. In these cases, computer modeling of groundwater conditions should be used to make the best possible approximations of the levels in the years leading up to 2015.

3. Address seasonal and annual variability. Establishing threshold levels for compliance should account for wet and dry years and seasonal variations. Beyond normal variability, we recommend water managers view the years immediately before 2015 as the bottom of the allowable range for water levels given the historic drought during that time. You can read both the report and the blog here:


Blog post: http://blogs.edf.org/growingreturns/2018/08/15/california-surface-water-depletions-sgma/

Paper: https://www.edf.org/content/addressing-regional-surface-water-depletions-california

 


California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment Reports

In a pair of new reports, published as part of California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, University of California researchers examine how the State Water Resources Control Board (Board) has carried out its water rights responsibilities during past droughts and offer recommendations for improving the agency’s future drought response.  

 

The Board's decisions are central to how water is allocated among different human and environmental uses during droughts. This analysis of water rights administration and oversight during the last four major statewide droughts suggests there was little preparation in advance of droughts, resulting in improvisation and ad hoc processes during these four droughts. The Board has made significant and creative advances in drought management, but also spent valuable time in the midst of drought crises marshaling its resources to make basic decisions about what drought response strategies to use, how to reconcile competing priorities, and how to communicate with stakeholders.  

 

Because future California droughts are likely to be more frequent, longer, and more intense, they will pose increasing challenges for water management, raising the stakes for effective drought response.  These reports argue that the Board can make its future drought responses more timely, effective, and transparent by 1) proactively adopting a contingency-based framework to support drought decision making and 2) taking a suite of complementary actions, including making key policy decisions in advance of droughts, strategically improving decision-related information, maximizing learning from past droughts, and prioritizing water rights enforcement between droughts. You can access the reports here:




Local GSA updates:

Lower Tule/Pixley GSA

At the last Groundwater Planning Commission for the Lower Tule Irrigation District GSA & PIxley Irrigation District GSA discussed the development of a draft chapter seven of their groundwater sustainability plan chapter.  This chapter focuses on the five drinking water communities which are: Tipton Community Services District (CSD), Woodville Public Utilities District (PUD), Poplar CSD, Pixley PUD, and Teviston CSD. This chapter says that on a quarterly basis the communities will report their total groundwater pumped and groundwater discharged to the GSA. Each of the communities will be identified a separate management area with their own minimum thresholds and measurable objectives. To read these draft chapter outlines, visit the GSAs’ website: http://www.ltrid.org/sgma/  

Lower Tule ID GSA and Pixley ID GSA meeting schedule:

  • Lower Tule ID GSA board meeting: 2nd Tuesday of the month at 9AM at Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.
  • Pixley ID GSA board meeting: 1st Thursday of the month at 9AM at Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.
  • Groundwater Planning Committee (GPC) meeting: combined planning meeting of the two GSAs. 4th Tuesday of every month at 10 AM at the Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.

 

Eastern Tule GSA

The ETGSA is continuing to develop their draft Communication and Engagement Plan which is a document is required of all GSAs, and will outline how the GSA will conduct outreach to stakeholders in their GSA and list all the opportunities for public participation. At last month’s Executive Committee meeting, the committee recommended to vote on an allocation of groundwater shares based on acreage. As part of this allocation, they also recommended to have a set-aside pool of water to allocate to the drinking water users that is equal to their historical pumping. These recommendations will go to the GSA board next month.

 

If you would like to sign up as an interested party and receive updates, event invitations, meeting agendas, meeting packets, notices regarding plan preparation and the availability of draft plans, and other relevant information regarding ETGSA and its developments, sign up here. Additionally, The Eastern Tule GSA has developed a survey as is asking for stakeholders to share their feedback. If you or someone you know live in the communities of Porterville, Terra Bella, Ducor, or Richgrove, you can access the survey here. You may also contact the Eastern Tule GSA directly by emailing  bmcateer@easterntulegsa.com, or visiting the website http://easterntulegsa.com/.

 

Eastern Tule GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: 1st Thursday of every month at 2PM at: City of Porterville, Council Chambers, 291 N. Main St. Porterville, 93257.
  • Stakeholder Committee meeting: 2nd and 4th Thursdays of every month at 2PM, City of Porterville Transit Multi Purpose Conference Room, 15 E Thurman Ave, Suite D, Porterville, 93257
  • Executive Committee meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 2PM, City of Porterville Transit Multi Purpose Conference Room, 15 E Thurman Ave, Suite D, Porterville, 93257



East Kaweah GSA

East Kaweah Advisory Committee has started to develop a list of policy points that they would like to recommend to the GSA board. Some of the topics on the list include: allocation of supply, management options, projects, funding mechanisms, monitoring, and data management.  

 

The East Kaweah GSA has developed a survey and is asking for stakeholders to share their feedback. If you or someone you know live in the communities of: Tooleville, Tonyville, El Rancho, Lindsay, Plainview, or Strathmore, you can access the survey in English here and Spanish here. You may also contact the East Kaweah GSA directly by emailing mhagman@lindmoreid.com, calling (559) 303-4150 or visiting the website www.ekgsa.org.

 

East Kaweah GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: fourth Monday of January, April, July, and October at 3PM at the Exeter Historical Museum.
  • Advisory Committee meeting: third Monday of every month at 4PM at Exeter Historical Museum.
  • Technical Advisory Committee meeting: first Friday of every month at 10AM at Provost & Pritchard Office in Visalia, CA.  

 

Kings River East GSA

Kings River East GSA will be holding a public meeting on Tuesday September 25th to select a board member and alternative for irrigation districts. The representative has to be part of the following special districts: Hills Valley Irrigation District, Orange Cove Irrigation District, Kings River Water District, and Tri-Valley Water District.  

 

Kings River East GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 2PM at: City of Dinuba, High Council Chambers – 405 East El Monte Avenue, Dinuba, CA 93618.
  • Advisory Committee meeting: every two months on the 3rd Wednesday of the month at 3:30PM at Alta Irrigation District Building, 289 N L St, Dinuba, CA 93618, USA.
  • Technical Advisory Committee meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 10AM at the Alta Irrigation District Building, 289 N L St, Dinuba, CA 93618, USA.

 


Featured resource of the month

Department of Water Resources: Climate Change Data Guidance Document Released

The Department of Water Resources’ Sustainable Groundwater Management Program (SGMP) released the Climate Change Data and Guidance Resource Guide which gives a high-level overview of climate change resources and includes datasets provided by the Department of Water Resources (DWR), tools for working with the DWR-provided datasets, and guidance for using DWR-provided data and tools when developing groundwater sustainability plans. This guide walks users through the process of deciding which data tool to use and how to incorporate it into their climate change analysis. The datasets and methods can provide technical assistance to groundwater sustainability agencies when developing projected water budgets. To read the guidance document, visit: https://water.ca.gov/-/media/DWR-Website/Web-Pages/Programs/Groundwater-Management/Sustainable-Groundwater-Management/Best-Management-Practices-and-Guidance-Documents/Files/Resource-Guide-Climate-Change-Guidance_v8.pdf

 


Drinking Water for Schools Grant Program Deadline Approaching

This program can be used install water bottle filling stations or drinking water fountains, and for interim water supplies and treatment devices for schools where contamination is an issue. The deadline for the Drinking Water in Schools Program is now March 1, 2019. There is still funding available for schools to apply. Of the $9.5 million available, approximately $1 million has been committed to date. Technical Assistance is available for school districts, or school service area that serves a population of 20,000 or less.

 

If a school in your community could benefit from this funding source, contact Rural Community Assistance Corporation at agua4all@rcac.org for more information on how to apply. To learn more, visit: http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=1ql79Y4zqc8%2FstF%2BGFcbWeqg7%2FJkp3Qf


Upcoming events

EVENT: Diagnosing and Solving Well Problems for Optimal Performance.

DATE: September 26. TIME: 8AM-3:30PM. LOCATION: Modesto. COST: $175.

DESCRIPTION: This session will discuss the various tools and techniques available to diagnose and treat various well problems ranging from bacterial contamination to reduced well yields, well sanding, and well casing issues. FOR MORE INFO: https://calruralwater.org/product/confined-space-entry-2/.

 

EVENT: Monitoring Land Subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley.

DATE: October 2. TIME: 8:15-2:30PM.  LOCATION: Alice Peters Auditorium (PB 191) in the University Business Center at Fresno State. COST: Free.

DESCRIPTION: This workshop will highlight ongoing land subsidence monitoring, monitoring techniques, the California Department of Water Resources' assistance for local agency SGMA compliance and will feature current results of satellite-based remote sensing monitoring. FOR MORE INFO: https://www.watereducation.org/foundation-event/monitoring-land-subsidence-san-joaquin-valley
EVENT: Water Treatment Certification Review (Grades 1- 2).

DATE: October 31-November 1, 2018.  LOCATION: Clarion Inn Conference Center, 1612 Sisk Rd., Modesto, CA 95350. COST: $350.

DESCRIPTION: California Rural Water Association (CRWA) is offering a series of two-day certification review classes designed to enhance operators’ working knowledge of water treatment. Classes include a pre-test and detailed instruction on the expected range of knowledge for water treatment operators and practice exams. This format refreshes operators on the many aspects of water treatment systems and helps sharpen their test-taking skills. FOR MORE INFO: https://calruralwater.org/product/water-treatment-certification-review-grades-1-2-2/

 

EVENT: Grant Funding and Infrastructure Planning.

DATE: December 12th. TIME: 8AM-12PM.  LOCATION: Clarion Inn Conference Center, 1612 Sisk Rd., Modesto, CA 95350. COST: $175.

DESCRIPTION: At this workshop the California Rural Water Association will share about how to plan and finance system improvements such as pump stations, pipelines, tank replacement and
expansions, and treatment facilities. FOR MORE INFO: https://calruralwater.org/product/grant-funding-and-infrastructure-planning-2/


August 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing:
Thursday, September 27th from 4-5PM  

As a reminder, there’s no briefing call this month and our next call is in September. Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a prepaid calling card in order to call long-distance.


Local Water Board Elections

August 10th was the last day to file to be a candidate in a local water board election. After the official filing period ends, if there are any offices where the incumbent did not file for candidacy, those seats enter into a candidate filing extension period. This filing extension period took place from August 10th until August 15th. During this period all seats where the incumbent didn’t file are open for other potential candidates to continue submitting their filing candidacy.  

 

For those leaders that were not able to file during the official candidate filing window or the filing extension, there is one last opportunity to file to be a candidate. From September 10th until October 23rd, community leaders can file to become write-in candidates.  Write-in candidates must go through the same filing process to become candidates except for their name will not be added to the ballot and they will have to let their community know to write in their name. If you know of any community leaders that missed the official filing window, please connect them with Adriana so they can learn more about the write-in candidate process.

 

Several community leaders took the next step to make a difference in their community and filed for candidacy in their local water board elections.  As of now, the Tulare County water districts that are having elections and are on this November ballot are: Poplar Community Services District, Yettem/Seville Community Services District, Richgrove Community Services District, Strathmore Public Utilities District, Earlimart Public Utilities District, Terra Bella Irrigation District, Lower Tule River Irrigation District, and Alpaugh Irrigation District.

 

There are also many community members that filed to join their water board and since no one filed to run for the same position as them, those water board seats are considered uncontested. When a seat is uncontested, the election does not make it to the ballot and the person who filed automatically joins the water board. Those community members that are new to their local water board are encouraged to apply to join the Community Water Leaders Network to receive ongoing support in their new roles.

 

Community Water Center is accepting applications from water decision makers to join CWLN, so please share the application with your new fellow board members or with board members who you think would benefit from joining this network!

 


Community Water Center is hiring a Community Organizer and a Program Associate for our new Central Coast Office

 

Community Organizer— The Community Organizer position is a regular, full-time, exempt employee position that will be primarily responsible for conducting CWC’s organizing and base-building work in communities in the Northern Central Coast Region (primarily Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Benito counties and parts of Santa Clara County). This position will report directly to the CWC Director of Organizing, Erica Fernandez Zamora and will work closely with other CWC staff, community partners and allies. If you have any questions, please contact Erica Fernandez at erica.fernandez@communitywatercenter.org.

 

Program Associate— The Program Associate is a regular, full-time, non-exempt, at-will employee position that will be primarily responsible for providing administrative and program support for the Central Coast Office. The Program Associate will report directly to the Community Solutions Director, Heather Lukacs. If you have any questions, please contact Heather Lukacs at heather.lukacs@communitywatercenter.org.

 

If you or someone you know is interested in applying, visit our website to access both of the application: https://www.communitywatercenter.org/careers.


Community Water Center is hiring canvassers for a Civic Engagement Project

Community Water Center is launching a campaign to engage thousands of voters in Tulare County this fall to ensure safe and affordable drinking water for all. We are looking for motivated individuals who desire to help transform their community and region. This is a 10-20 day campaign from early October to early November. The team will work five days per week (tentatively Wednesday through Friday from 3:30pm-8:30pm, and Saturdays and Sundays, when the team will work from 11:00am to 4:00pm). The days worked are subject to change depending on campaign’s progress and goals. This is a temporary, part-time, hourly position primarily responsible for contacting thousands of voters through daily phone banking and door-to-door canvassing to potential voters. The campaign is designed to talk on the phone and face-to-face with voters to identify voters supportive of water justice and build support for campaigns that would ensure safe, affordable drinking water for all. If you have any questions, please contact Karina Gallardo at Karina.Gallardo@communitywatercenter.org.

 

If you or someone you know is interested in applying, visit our website to access the application: https://www.communitywatercenter.org/community_outreach_canvasser_2018.

 


Save the date for Somos el Poder y el Cambio—  We are the Power and the Change!

WHEN: October 11, 2018 at 5:30pm

WHERE: Café 210  210 W Center Ave, Visalia, CA 93291


State/Legislative updates

Updates on the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund

 

The Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund that was originally introduced as Senate Bill 623 and was reintroduced on Friday, August 17th as Senate Bill 844 and Senate Bill 845. Senator Monning authored both bills along with Senator Vidak as co-author. The structure of the funding has changed and here's a quick summary of the two bills:

Senate Bill 844-- Agriculture and dairies will pay a fee for fertilizer that will go towards addressing nitrate contamination. This part of the package has remained the same except for an increase in the fertilizer fee. This part of the package still requires a 2/3 vote.

 

Senate Bill 845-- Originally the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund (SB 623) included a safe drinking water fee of $0.95 per month for all water users except low-income households. SB 845 changes the mandatory requirement and instead creates a voluntary program where water users can choose to opt out of a $1/month safe drinking water fee. This part of the package requires a majority vote.

 

If both of these bills pass, this package of safe drinking water legislation will help ensure universal access to safe drinking water in California. Over 140 organizations have been working hard to push our representatives to pass this important bill package. Community members, allies, and Community Water Center staff went to the capitol on Tuesday to lobby with legislators and raise awareness about California’s drinking water crisis. Laurel and Susana also authored an Opinion piece that ran in the New York Times to urge lawmakers to support this solution. We have until the end of August to get the votes needed to pass this bill package and we will continue to push our representatives to act. Thank you for all your efforts to support this fund and we will keep you all updated as things progress.  

 


Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) updates

Save the dates for two upcoming SGMA workshops! The Community Water Center, the Union of Concerned Scientists, Self Help Enterprises, and Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability will be hosting two workshops on groundwater management in October. These workshops are being funded through a Department of Water Resources (DWR) SGMA grant. More information on these special events below:

 


Groundwater Quality in the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) CWLN Roundtable

DATE: Wednesday, October 10th, 2018

TIME: 5:00PM--7:30PM

LOCATION: Cafe 210, 210 W. Center Ave. (corner of Center and Locust), Visalia, CA 93291

 

Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) are currently developing plans, Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs), that will outline how groundwater resources will be managed locally. As part of developing their plans, the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) requires GSAs to address how they will avoid six undesirable results.  This roundtable will focus on the undesirable result of the “significant and unreasonable degradation of groundwater quality.”

 

At this roundtable, state representatives will speak on how regulatory programs like SGMA and CV SALTS are interconnected and how GSAs can develop robust plans that complement other regulatory frameworks. Researchers will be sharing information about how groundwater pumping and groundwater recharge influence the geochemistry of the aquifer, changes in groundwater quality, and recommendations for GSAs how to proactively plan or address these concerns. And lastly, representatives from local water districts will be sharing the groundwater quality remediation projects their water district is implementing. We hope to see you join our conversation!

 


Groundwater Sustainability Planning Workshop 2.0

DATE: Saturday, October 27th, 2018

TIME: TBD (will be a half day workshop, possibly 10:00AM— 3:30PM)

LOCATION: TBD

 

This workshop on October 27th is a continuation of the Groundwater Sustainability Planning workshops that CWLN hosted in 2017. This half-day workshop, will feature a series of presentations and interactive  exercises that will help participants better understand and engage in the creation of Groundwater Sustainability Plans. The topics will focus on understanding water budgets, developing sustainability criteria, and management actions and projects. The details on the time and location are still being finalized so in the meantime, please place a save the date on your calendar.

 

If you have any questions about these two workshops, please contact Adriana Renteria at adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org or 559-733-0219.

 


Local Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) updates

 

East Kaweah GSA

Earlier this month the East Kaweah GSA, in collaboration with CWC,  Self Help Enterprises, and Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, hosted two community outreach meetings in Exeter and Lindsay. At these two workshops participants learned about SGMA, their GSA, as well as went over the Kaweah Subbasin’s draft water budget.

 

A water budget is a tool that helps GSAs understand the basin’s groundwater conditions and can help estimate the sustainable yield, which is the amount of groundwater that can be used without causing an undesirable result. The draft water budget for the Kaweah Subbasin includes inflows (water coming into the basin) of the following categories:

  1. irrigation return flows- the amount of groundwater that is returned to the groundwater aquifer after crops are irrigated
  2. conveyance percolation- the amount of groundwater that seeps through the canals and enters the groundwater aquifer
  3. Precipitation- the amount of rain that sinks through the ground and enters the groundwater aquifer
  4. Natural channel- the amount of water that seeps through rivers and streams and enters into the groundwater aquifer
  5. Recharge programs- there are several projects in the GSA where water is manually applied to a recharge basin. These recharge basins collect water either from storms/flooding or from surface water supplies from irrigation districts and the goal is to have the water percolate and sink into the groundwater aquifer to fill the aquifer up.

 

These numbers are still in draft form and were extrapolated from the data collected by the Water Resources Investigation. GEI is the consultant developing the water budget at the subbasin level and Provost and Pritchard is working to better understand the conditions at the local GSA level. The water budget is anticipated to be finalized in October. The draft hydrologic conceptual model (HCM) is anticipated to be finalized in November. The hydrologic conceptual model takes information from the water budget, as well as historical water information, and can be used to simulate how things may change in the future taking into consideration climate change, population growth, and land use changes.

 

The East Kaweah GSA has developed a survey and is asking for stakeholders to share their feedback. If you or someone you know live in the communities of: Tooleville, Tonyville, El Rancho, Lindsay, Plainview, or Strathmore, you can access the survey in English here and Spanish here. You may also contact the East Kaweah GSA directly by emailing mhagman@lindmoreid.com, calling (559) 303-4150 or visiting the website www.ekgsa.org.

 

East Kaweah GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: fourth Monday of January, April, July, and October at 3PM at the Exeter Historical Museum.
  • Advisory Committee meeting: third Monday of every month at 4PM at Exeter Historical Museum.
  • Technical Advisory Committee meeting: first Friday of every month at 10AM at Provost & Pritchard Office in Visalia, CA.  

 

Kings River East GSA

The Kings Subbasin has almost completed an analysis that is estimating the total overdraft of the basin. Overdraft occurs when there is more water that is being taken out of the basin than is being replaced.  Provost & Pritchard Consulting Group are the consultants that are developing that estimate and once they quantify the total of the basin they will divide that value amongst the seven GSAs in the Kings subbasin. At the subbasin level, the GSAs are finalizing their data sharing agreement that will outline how the GSAs will share information about water entering and exiting their GSAs inorder for each GSA to better understand the groundwater conditions of their area. Kings River East GSA has started invoicing landowners who are pumping groundwater. These fees are collected based on groundwater usage and they are being used to pay for the development of the Groundwater Sustainability Plans. Once the plan is developed the GSA will also develop a funding strategy for how they will pay for management actions and projects.

Kings River East GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 2PM at: City of Dinuba, High Council Chambers – 405 East El Monte Avenue, Dinuba, CA 93618.
  • Advisory Committee meeting: every two months on the 3rd Wednesday of the month at 3:30PM at Alta Irrigation District Building, 289 N L St, Dinuba, CA 93618, USA.
  • Technical Advisory Committee meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 10AM at the Alta Irrigation District Building, 289 N L St, Dinuba, CA 93618, USA.

 

Lower Tule River Irrigation District (LTRID) GSA & Pixley Irrigation District (PID) GSA

The Lower Tule ID GSA and Pixley ID GSA have developed six draft groundwater sustainability plan chapters. These chapters are still preliminary chapters and provide an outline on different topics ranging from how the GSA will measure water imported into the basin, how groundwater credits will be issued to landowners, how landowners will be able to transfer groundwater credits amongst each other, and how landowners will be allocated additional groundwater credits for developing recharge projects. To read these draft chapter outlines, visit the two GSAs’ website: http://www.ltrid.org/sgma/

 

Lower Tule ID GSA and Pixley ID GSA meeting schedule:

  • Lower Tule ID GSA board meeting: 2nd Tuesday of the month at 9AM at Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.
  • Pixley ID GSA board meeting: 1st Thursday of the month at 9AM at Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.
  • Groundwater Planning Committee (GPC) meeting: combined planning meeting of the two GSAs. 4th Tuesday of every month at 10 AM at the Lower Tule River Irrigation, 357 E Olive Ave, Tipton, CA 93272, USA.

 

Eastern Tule GSA

The Eastern Tule GSA (ETGSA) officially hired an Executive Director. Bryce McAteer worked with Mike Young prior to being hired by the ETGSA in July as their new permanent Executive Director.  

 

The ETGSA has begun the process of drafting a Communication and Engagement Plan, which they hope to discuss at their next meeting of the Board of Directors on  Sept 6, 2018. This document is required of all GSAs, and will outline how the GSA will conduct outreach to stakeholders in their GSA and list all the opportunities for public participation. They have also created a master calendar of meetings, which can be accessed on their website (here), and are working on finalizing a section-by-section schedule for completion of their Draft GSP by the intended completion date of April 2019.

 

If you would like to sign up as an interested party and receive updates, event invitations, meeting agendas, meeting packets, notices regarding plan preparation and the availability of draft plans, and other relevant information regarding ETGSA and its developments, sign up here.

Additionally, The Eastern Tule GSA has developed a survey as is asking for stakeholders to share their feedback. If you or someone you know live in the communities of Porterville, Terra Bella, Ducor, or Richgrove, you can access the survey here. You may also contact the Eastern Tule GSA directly by emailing  bmcateer@easterntulegsa.com, or visiting the website http://easterntulegsa.com/.

 

Eastern Tule GSA meeting schedule:

  • Board meeting: 1st Thursday of every month at 2PM at: City of Porterville, Council Chambers, 291 N. Main St. Porterville, 93257.
  • Stakeholder Committee meeting: 2nd Thursday of every month at 2PM, location changed to City of Porterville Transit Multi Purpose Conference Room, 15 E Thurman Ave, Suite D, Porterville, 93257
  • Executive Committee meeting: 3rd Thursday of every month at 2PM, location changed to City of Porterville Transit Multi Purpose Conference Room, 15 E Thurman Ave, Suite D, Porterville, 93257

Featured Resource of the Month:

Spanish translations of the SGMA regulations and Communications and Engagement Plan  

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) recently released Spanish translations of two documents that are important for the implementation of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). The first document that was translated is the Groundwater Sustainability Plan Emergency Regulations Guide. This document was written to explain the regulations and requirements for implementing the four phases of the law which are: 1) forming Groundwater Sustainability Agencies, 2) developing Groundwater Sustainability Plans, 3) revising and evaluating the plan, 4) implementing the plan.

 

The other document that was translated was the Stakeholder Communication and Engagement guidance document. This document was created to provide guidance to GSA’s to develop their Communications and Engagement plans. GSAs are required to create a document that outlines how they will conduct outreach to stakeholders in their GSA and list all the opportunities for public participation.

 

Both of these documents are really important in understanding how SGMA will be implemented and in understanding how GSAs should be outreaching to stakeholders and creating opportunities for public participation. Please share these documents with members of your board or community members who speak Spanish and would benefit from learning more.

 


Upcoming events

 

DATE: August 28. TIME: 6-7PM. EVENT: Webinar: Water System Financial Management for California Board Members, Local Elected Officials, and System Owners.

LOCATION: Webinar. COST: Free.

EVENT DESCRIPTION: This webinar will provide an overview of key financial management best practices for small water system owners, board members, and local elected officials. We will discuss the fiscal responsibilities of water system leaders, budgeting best practices, and ways to measure and improve the overall financial health of the water system. You will also learn about how water systems can best use reserve accounts to improve their financial management. For more info: https://calmutuals.org/event/water-system-financial-management-for-california-board-members-local-elected-officials-and-system-owners/


DATE: August 29. TIME: 11AM-12PM.  EVENT: California's new conservation requirements: Coming to a theater near you?

LOCATION: Webinar: $40.00. COST: $40.

EVENT DESCRIPTION: The Association of California Water Agencies is hosting a webinar on the new water conservation bills that Governor Brown signed that require urban water providers to develop water use targets for their service area by 2022. For more info: https://www.acwa.com/events/webinar-californias-new-conservation-requirements-coming-to-a-theater-near-you/

 

DATE: September 10. TIME: 6-8PM. EVENT: AB 54 Webinar.

LOCATION: Webinar. COST: $99.

EVENT DESCRIPTION: AB-54 is a requirement for all Directors of Mutual Water Companies regardless of size. Our training meets the two-hour AB-54 Director Training Requirement. The specific law requires that each board member of a Mutual Water Company operated as a public water system to, within six months of taking office, complete a two-hour course offered by a qualified trainer. CRWA is a qualified accredited training organization, and will cover pertinent area’s relating to this law. AB-54 was signed into law and took effect January 2012. AB-54 is a requirement for all Directors of Mutual Water Companies regardless of size. For more info: https://calruralwater.org/product/ab-54-webinar-2/

DATE: October 2. TIME: 8:15-2:30PM. EVENT: Monitoring Land Subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley.

LOCATION: Alice Peters Auditorium (PB 191) in the University Business Center at Fresno State, COST: Free.

EVENT DESCRIPTION: This workshop will highlight ongoing land subsidence monitoring, monitoring techniques, the California Department of Water Resources' assistance for local agency SGMA compliance and will feature current results of satellite-based remote sensing monitoring. For more info: https://www.watereducation.org/foundation-event/monitoring-land-subsidence-san-joaquin-valley

 

DATE: October 31-November 1, 2018. EVENT: Water Treatment Certification Review (Grades 1- 2)

LOCATION: Location:Clarion Inn Conference Center, 1612 Sisk Rd., Modesto, CA 95350. COST: $350.

EVENT DESCRIPTION: California Rural Water Association (CRWA) is offering a series of two-day certification review classes designed to enhance operators’ working knowledge of water treatment. Classes include a pre-test and detailed instruction on the expected range of knowledge for water treatment operators and practice exams. This format refreshes operators on the many aspects of water treatment systems and helps sharpen their test-taking skills. For more info: https://calruralwater.org/product/water-treatment-certification-review-grades-1-2-2/


July 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing: Thursday, May 24th from 4-5PM  

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.


Save the date for Somos el Poder y el Cambio—  We are the Power and the Change!

WHEN: October 11, 2018 at 5:30pm

WHERE: Café 210  210 W Center Ave, Visalia, CA 93291


Local water board elections

July 16th was the first day of the filing window for registering to be a candidate for your local water board election. The last day to file your paperwork to be a candidate is Friday, August 10th. Is your term up for election this year? If so, have you filed for candidacy yet? Do you have friends that may be interested in running this year?

Community Water Center has created a webpage with information about local water boards and information on the process for running in an election. Our goal with this resource is to help share information on local water boards, to encourage community members to run for a seat themselves, and to then support new water board members through the Community Water Leaders Network.

On our webpage you will find information on:

  • Local water boards and the process for running to be on your local water board
  • Contact information for county elections offices
  • The number of seats local water boards have up for election this year

Visit www.communitywatercenter.org/water_board_elections to learn more about local water boards. Feel free to share this with your network or connect interested folks with Adriana Renteria.


1,2,3-TCP 1st quarter sampling results

On December 14, 2017, the State Water Board approved an early effective date for the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of contaminant 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), which is the cancer causing chemical that has caused contamination of California soil since the 80s due to extensive application of soil fumigants manufactured by Dow and Shell Chemicals. Water systems were required to start quarterly monitoring for 1,2,3-TCP in the calendar quarter beginning January 2018 and the State Water Board has released the results of the first quarter of sampling.  

Figure 3 above shows the results of the different water sources and how they are distributed in the 23 counties. The bars show how many of the water sources in the counties have 1,2,3-TCP water samples that fall within the four ranges of contamination they have identified. The orange bars show water systems that had 1,2,3-TCP samples that were between 5-10 parts per trillion. The yellow bars show water systems that had samples that were between 10-15 parts per trillion the green bars show samples that were between 15-20 parts per trillion and the dark red bars show samples that were higher than 20 parts per trillion. The maximum contaminant level (MCL) for 1,2,3-TCP is 5 parts per trillion and this chart shows us that many water systems have levels that exceed that MCL. This chart also shows that there is correlation between drinking water sources that are impacted by 1,2,3-TCP and agricultural and industrial areas.  Most of the drinking water sources that are impacted by 1,2,3-TCP are in the Central Valley where 1,2,3-TCP was used for agricultural use.

If your system is impacted by  1,2,3-TCP, in order to obtain cost recovery your system needs to obtain legal representation in order to sue the responsible parties, Shell and Dow Chemicals, for  1,2,3-TCP contamination. Robins Borghei LLP is the primary law firm litigating 1,2,3-TCP cases and has a strong track record in winning cases on behalf of communities dealing with  1,2,3-TCP contamination. For any questions regarding 1,2,3-TCP contamination, contact the State Water Resources Control Board. Read the full report here: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/drinking_water/certlic/drinkingwater/documents/123-tcp/123_tcp_sampling_q1_2018.pdf


New drinking water notification levels for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) &  perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS)

PFOA and PFOS are man-made chemicals that were created for water resistance. PFOA & PFOS have been used in products like carpets, clothing, fabrics for furniture, paper packaging for food, and cookware designed to be waterproof, stain-resistant or non-stick. Though people are mainly exposed to these chemicals through household products, these chemicals can also accumulate in the groundwater in localized areas near manufacturing facilities and people can be exposed to them through drinking water. Exposure to PFOA and PFOS can cause certain health impacts including impacting the development of fetuses during pregnancy and breastfed infants, cancer (kidney or testicular), liver damage, immune effects, and other impacts. Starting in 2000, manufacturers of PFOA and PFOS started phasing out the production of these chemicals.

Based on the cancer risks and impacts to liver toxicity, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has recommended an interim notification level (NLs) for PFOS and PFOA. The Division of Drinking Water (DDW) then established a notification level of 13 part per trillion for PFOS and 14 parts per trillion for PFOA. Notification levels (NLs) are different than maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Notification levels are health-based advisory levels for chemicals that don’t have maximum contaminant levels. When a drinking water system has chemicals past a certain level called the “response level” then that drinking water system should take the drinking water source out of service. The response level for PFOA and PFOS combined is 70 parts per trillion. Drinking water systems are not currently required to monitor for PFOA or PFOS. Some water systems that are concerned about possible contamination have voluntarily chosen to sample their supplies for PFOA and PFOS. To read the announcement, visit: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/drinking_water/certlic/drinkingwater/PFOA_PFOS.html


Supporting Prop 3 the November Water Bond

Prop 3 is a water bond on the November ballot that contains historic levels of funding that would greatly support Central Valley communities. There is a tremendous need for more capital funding investment, particularly in small, low-income communities of color in the Central Valley. This bond would generate a total of $8.877 billion. Of that total, safe drinking water and wastewater would be allocated $750 million and funding to support groundwater efforts would be $675 million. The rest of the bond funding would be allocated to different needs including: stormwater projects ($550 million), watershed improvement and restoration ($3.6+ billion), infrastructure repairs for the Friant Kern and Madera Canals ($750 million), Oroville Dam infrastructure repairs and flood management projects ($700 million), groundwater desalination ($400 million), wastewater recycling ($400 million), and water conservation ($365 million).

The amount of funding allocated for safe drinking water is historic and greatly needed. The bond would help provide funding for capital infrastructure projects and it is a necessary complement to the Governor’s proposed Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund that would help cover operations and maintenance costs. Taken together, they will dramatically advance achievement of the human right to water in California. Community Water Center helped write the safe drinking water, wastewater and groundwater sections of Prop 3 and we are looking forward to keeping you all engaged on our efforts to pass the water bond this November. If you have any questions about the water bond, please contact Jonathan Nelson at jonathan.nelson@communitywatercenter.org or 916-706-3346.


Update on the Tulare Kern Funding Area Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Disadvantaged Community Involvement Program (DACIP) Project Advisory Committee (PAC)

The Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) program is a statewide water planning effort that incentivizes and promotes regional water management and the implementation of multi-benefit water projects. The Disadvantaged Community Involvement Grant Program (DACIP) was created to ensure the involvement of disadvantaged communities in IRWM planning efforts. The Tulare Kern Funding Area was allocated $3.4 million for this project and this funding area includes participation from 7 IRWM groups: Kaweah River Basin IRWM Group, Kern County IRWM Group, Kings Basin Water Authority, Poso Creek IRWM Group, Southern Sierra Regional Water Management Group, Tule River Basin IRWM Group, and Westside-San Joaquin IRWM Group; and tribal representatives, Counties, DAC representatives, and environmental justice groups.

This DAC Involvement Program will be developing a needs assessment of all communities within the Tulare Lake Basin area that will include an evaluation of the community characteristics, drinking water, wastewater, stormwater and other water related needs. The program will also help communities develop projects for construction funding including preparing environmental documents, engineering studies and more. The program will also have education and engagement programs that will consist of community meetings, training workshops and educational field trips. The Project Advisory Committee (PAC) has met three times to develop and give feedback on the criteria for developing the needs assessment and will be meeting again in August. If you are interested in learning more about this program, visit:  http://www.kingsbasinauthority.org/projects-funding/ongoing-projects/prop-1-irwm-dac-involvement-grant/  


CV-SALTS basin plan amendment moves to the State Water Board

CV-SALTS (Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long-Term Sustainability) is a planning process that has been going on for nearly 12 years. CV-SALTS is comprised of a group of dischargers along with Regional and State Water Board staff members who have been working to create a salt and nutrient management (SNMP) which would help guide the adoption of a basin plan amendment. This basin plan amendment will dictate how the discharge of salts and nitrates will be regulated within the Central Valley.

There are three overarching goals of CV-SALTS:

1) Ensure communities impacted by nitrate contamination have access to safe water,

2) Achieve balance of nitrates leaching into the groundwater,

3) Restore groundwater basins.

On May 31st the Central Valley Regional Water Board adopted an amendment to the Central Valley Basin Plan for the regulation of nitrate and salinity. The Basin Plan Amendment now moves onto the State Water Board for final review and approval. On July 13th, the comment period for written comments to the State Water Board opened and must be submitted by August 13th at noon. To review the notice and Basin Plan Amendment go here.

Community Water Center will be hosting a webinar to go over CV SALTS in more depth on Friday, July 27th from 10:30am-12pm. To join the webinar, contact Ryan Jensen at ryan.jensen@communitywatercenter.org or at 559-733-0219. If you can’t join the webinar, there will also be a recording that can be shared.


Upcoming events

DATE: August 9th. TIME: 11:00 am - 12:00 pm. EVENT: How to Build Marketing Skills to Gain Support from Water Customers. Location: Webinar. Cost: Free. http://efcnetwork.org/events/webinar-how-to-build-marketing-skills-to-gain-support-from-water-customers/


DATE: August 28th. TIME: 6:00-7:00pm. EVENT: Water System Financial Management for California Board Members, Local Elected Officials, and System Owners. LOCATION: Webinar. COST: Free.

DESCRIPTION: This webinar will provide an overview of key financial management best practices for small water system owners, board members, and local elected officials. We will discuss the fiscal responsibilities of water system leaders, budgeting best practices, and ways to measure and improve the overall financial health of the water system. You will also learn about how water systems can best use reserve accounts to improve their financial management. MORE INFO: https://calmutuals.org/event/water-system-financial-management-for-california-board-members-local-elected-officials-and-system-owners/

DATE: September 10th. TIME: 6:00-8:00pm. EVENT: AB 54 Webinar. Location: Online. COST: $99.

DESCRIPTION: AB-54 is a requirement for all Directors of Mutual Water Companies regardless of size. Our training meets the two-hour AB-54 Director Training Requirement. The specific law requires that each board member of a Mutual Water Company operated as a public water system to, within six months of taking office, complete a two-hour course offered by a qualified trainer. AB-54 is a requirement for all Directors of Mutual Water Companies regardless of size. MORE INFO: https://calruralwater.org/product/ab-54-webinar-2/

DATES: October 31st-November 1st. EVENT: Water Treatment Certification Review (Grades 1- 2). LOCATION: Clarion Inn Conference Center, 1612 Sisk Rd., Modesto, CA 95350. COST: $350.

DESCRIPTION: California Rural Water Association (CRWA) is offering a series of two-day certification review classes designed to enhance operators’ working knowledge of water treatment. Classes include a pre-test and detailed instruction on the expected range of knowledge for water treatment operators and practice exams. This format refreshes operators on the many aspects of water treatment systems and helps sharpen their test-taking skills. MORE INFO: https://calruralwater.org/product/water-treatment-certification-review-grades-1-2-2/


May 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing:
Thursday, May 24th from 4-5PM  

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.

Agenda:

  • 1. member updates and questions
  • 2. regional & state updates
  • 3. monthly discussion topic: preparing for drought and identifying vulnerabilities

Tulare County Candidate Forum

In May the Tulare County Candidate Forum Coalition hosted two candidate forums. The first took place in Porterville on April 26 and the second in Orosi on May 3. The first forum in Porterville hosted candidates for Board of Supervisors District 5 and CA State Assembly District 26. The second forum hosted candidates for Board of Supervisors District 4 and CA State Senate District #14. These forums were a great opportunity to hear local candidate responses to community members concerns and their ideas for advancing long term sustainable water solutions. Read more about the Porterville forum in The Porterville Recorder and the Valley Voice.


Safe & Affordable Drinking Water Fund

CWC continues to lead a historic policy advocacy campaign for the creation of a new California Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund, which would provide $140 million annually to address persistent barriers to safe and affordable water for low-income communities in California. The Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund was originally introduced as Senate Bill 623 (Monning). The Governor in his January 2018 budget committed to introducing statutory language consistent with SB 623 in a budget trailer bill, and also included nearly $5 million in one-time startup funding to help set up the Fund. That trailer bill language has since been posted on the Department of Finance's website and is pending amendment into a trailer bill vehicle. Inclusion in his budget represented a strong signal of support and has helped place this campaign on a trajectory towards success -- passage of the most significant safe drinking water legislation in a generation. Notably, more than 100 impacted residents, including some CWLN members, have made trips to the Capitol to meet with legislators about their experiences living without safe and affordable drinking water, and more than 1,000 people statewide have taken action to support the Fund. The Fund is also backed by an unusually broad, diverse group of more than 130 stakeholders including agricultural groups, business, environmental justice, environmental, public health, labor, water agencies, local government, and more.

We anticipate final votes to happen in either June or August. We strongly encourage all CWLN members to call or email your legislator and urge their support for the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund. You can take action here: fundsafewaterca.org. We also encourage CWLN members to pass resolutions of support. Thank you to the many CWLN members that have already done so -- your voice makes a difference!


Rally in support of the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund

Please join us and invite your friends, family, and community to join us in Sacramento on June 13th! We’ll be holding a rally with press and doing a community advocacy day. We would love to have you join us for this opportunity to make history!


National Drinking Water Week rallies

On the Friday of National Drinking Water Week, more than 60 people, including Dolores Huerta, came out to simultaneous rallies in Merced and Bakersfield to push for the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund. The San Joaquin Valley is hard hit by toxic tap water, and residents spoke out for change during National Drinking Water Week. The rallies were covered by many local news stations, including Bakersfield Now, KGET, The Bakersfield Californian, Your Central Valley, and The Merced Sun-Star. Residents spoke about living with unsafe and unaffordable drinking water, and about the need for legislators to support the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund.


Visalia District Celebrates Completion of 1,2,3  TCP (1,2,3-Trichloropropane) Treatment Plant

This month, Cal Water held a ceremony to celebrate the completion of a treatment plant for 1,2,3 TCP. 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), is the cancer causing chemical that has caused contamination of California soil since the 80s due to extensive application of soil fumigants manufactured by Dow and Shell Chemicals. On December 14, 2017, the State Water Board approved an early effective date for the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 parts per trillion (ppt) for the contaminant  Water systems were required to start quarterly monitoring for 1,2,3-TCP in the calendar quarter beginning January 2018. All the water that had been served to Visalia customers has been in compliance and this treatment system is being installed to be able to bring on new water sources when there is more demand in the future. Now that West Goshen residents that were previously served by the West Goshen Mutual Water Company are connected to Visalia’s Cal Water system, they can also celebrate that their water meets 1,2,3 TCP compliance.  

If your system is impacted by 123-TCP, in order to obtain cost recovery your system needs to obtain legal representation in order to sue the responsible parties, Shell and Dow Chemicals, for 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Robins Borghei LLP is the primary firm litigating 123 TCP cases and has a strong track record in winning cases on behalf of communities dealing with 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Litigation can take anywhere from a year to 3 or more years, so if you are impacted by 1-2-3 TCP and are in need of financial assistance to come into compliance with the new MCL, there are funding sources at the state available for eligible entities. The primary funding source is the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), and the Prop 1 Groundwater Grant Fund is also a secondary option to cover instances where the DWSRF doesn’t cover. In order to qualify for state funding sources you will likely be required to show you are initiating efforts to recover costs from the responsible parties. For any questions, contact the State Water Resources Control Board.


California Water Commission Updates

The California Water Commission is a nine member commission appointed by the Governor. The Commission advises the Department of Water Resources (DWR) and helps develop policies to support sustainable water resource management. Through the Prop 1 Water Storage Investment Program (WSIP), the Commission will fund the public benefit costs of new water storage projects. In May, the Commission determined the public benefit ratios of the proposed projects. This May the California Water Commision allocated $2.3 Billion in funding for water storage projects. Out of the total 11 projects proposed, there were three projects submitted for the San Joaquin Valley. The Temperance Flat Reservoir Project was allocated a smaller portion of funding that desired. The Tulare Lake Storage and Floodwater Protection Project was deemed not eligible and the Kern Fan Groundwater Storage Project received funding it requested.

 

In making allocations the Commission can only fund the “public benefits” of these projects such as environmental and public safety benefits. The public benefits ratio is one of the four components that projects get scored on, the other three are: relative environmental value, resiliency and implementation risk. In June 2018, the Commission will determine the project scores and then in July 2018 the Commision will determine the maximum eligible funding. For more information on the California Water Commission and their public benefit ratio determinations, visit: https://cwc.ca.gov/Pages/Home.aspx


Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) Intended Use Plan (IUP)

The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) is a funding source administered by the State Water Board to help water systems in need of financing for capital infrastructure projects. Financing can come in the form of principal forgiveness (grants) or loans (which may include low or no-interest terms). The Intended Use Plan (IUP) describes how the Board plans to administer the funds available within the DWSRF that year and includes the Board’s funding priorities, requirements for applicants, and state and federal limitations. The IUP will be adopted at either the June or July Board meeting, but has not yet been agendaized for one of the hearings.


CV-SALTS (Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long-Term Sustainability)

CV-SALTS (Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long-Term Sustainability) is a planning process that has been going on for nearly 12 years. CV-SALTS is comprised of a group of dischargers along with Regional and State Water Board staff members who have been working to create a salt and nutrient management (SNMP) which would help guide the adoption of a basin plan amendment. This basin plan amendment will dictate how the discharge of salts and nitrates will be regulated within the Central Valley. Community Water Center alongside Clean Water Action and Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability have also participated in CV-SALTS for several years. There are three overarching goals of CV-SALTS:

1) Ensure communities impacted by nitrate contamination have access to safe water,

2) Achieve balance of nitrates leaching into the groundwater,

3) Restore groundwater basins.

The basin plan amendment was released in March 2018 and the comment deadline closed on May 7th. The Regional Water Board will be hearing public comments and considering the  adoption of the basin plan amendment on May 31st (and if necessary also June 1st).

As leaders within your communities, it is important that you are aware and participate in both the adoption and implementation of the basin plan amendment. The basin plan amendment has a potential significant impact upon your water district and community. As mentioned earlier, CV-SALTS indicates that all communities impacted by nitrate contamination, now and into the future, must be provided assistance to ensure everyone has access to safe drinking water. In the early years of CV-SALTS implementation, dischargers will be identifying all communities impacted by nitrate contamination within their management zone and communities currently being served unsafe water will be provided replacement water by the dischargers. Though it is still not determined, it is probable that communities that have an active source of nitrate contamination but are currently treating the contamination, will be assisted later down the road. It is essential for your water district to be part of the implementation of the basin plan amendment to ensure that local nitrate dischargers are aware of your problems with nitrates and so that your water district is involved in the decision making process for addressing concerns. If you are interested in learning more, CWC is offering presentations on CV-SALTS. If you would like CWC to present about CV-SALTS to your water district please contact Adriana Renteria. If you have any other questions on CV-SALTS please feel free to reach out to Debi Ores at deborah.ores@communitywatercenter.org.


Drinking Water in Schools Funding Program

This program can be used install water bottle filling stations or drinking water fountains, and for interim water supplies and treatment devices for schools where contamination is an issue. A few of the schools in the San Joaquin Valley that have applied so far are: Firebaugh Unified School District, Central Union School District, Fresno Unified School District, Richgrove Elementary School District, Monson Sultana, Pond Union School District, Allensworth Elementary School District, and Reef Sunset Unified School District. They are still accepting applications so if a school in your community could benefit from this funding source, contact Rural Community Assistance Corporation at agua4all@rcac.org for more information on how to apply. To learn more, visit: http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=1ql79Y4zqc8%2FstF%2BGFcbWeqg7%2FJkp3Qf


Department of Water Resources (DWR) Draft Prioritization of Groundwater Basins Under Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

In May the Department of Water Resources Sustainable Groundwater Management Program released a draft prioritization of groundwater basins. Basins throughout the state are ranked high, medium, low, or very low-priority. Basins ranking high- or medium-priority are subject to SGMA and need to create Groundwater Sustainability Agencies. The new draft prioritization identifies 109 out of 517 basins as high and medium priority. There are 14 basins that are now ranked as high or medium high priority that will have to form GSAs. There are also 38 basins that were previously ranked high or medium that are now ranked low or very low priority and no longer need to form GSAs but can do so if they would like. In the San Joaquin Valley, the Pleasant Valley basin was reranked from a low/very low priority basin to a medium priority basin and are now subject to SGMA. To check out a map of the reprioritized basins, visit: https://gis.water.ca.gov/app/bp2018-dashboard/.


Featured resource of the month: State Water Board Translations for Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR) Templates

Last May, the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) of Northern California sent a letter to the State Water Resources Control Board requesting that the State Water Board make available translated CCR templates so that public water systems could use the templates and ensure that consumers receive these reports in the required languages. Previously, the Board only provided the template in English and it became evident that many public water systems were using the exact template but not translating it themselves. Because of this, many non-English speaking communities only received the CCR in English. ACLU NC has been working with the State Water Board’s Chair to ensure the templates are translated and there are now two additional versions available: one in Spanish and one in Hmong. The Board plans to provide additional translations in 2018 but for now, water boards are encouraged to use these templates to work to ensure all members of their communities can read and understand their CCR report.


Upcoming events

DATE: 5/23. TIME: 8:30AM-3:30PM. EVENT: AB54 & AB1234 en Espanol. LOCATION: Wyndham Visalia
9000 W Airport Dr, Visalia, California 93277. COST: FREE.  Los participantes aprenderán y entenderán: AB54 y AB240 requisitos éticos de la junta para una empresa de agua mutua, Leyes de reuniones abiertos, Conflictos de interés, Que es comportamiento ético, Responsabilidades financieros, Creación de políticas. Este taller cumple con los requisitos legales para el entrenamiento ético de los miembros de la junta según AB54 y AB 240. MORE INFO: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1312

 

DATE: 5/21. TIME: 6-7pm. EVENT: Kern Groundwater Authority Groundwater Workshop. LOCATION: Arvin Veterans Memorial Hall, 414 4th Ave. 93 203. COST: FREE. TO REGISTER: call or email Abigail Solis AbigailS@SelfHelpEnterprises.org 559-802-1659.

 

DATE: 5/22. TIME: 11:30 AM. EVENT: Urban Water Update: How TCP is impacting Urban Water Purveyors. LOCATION: Bakersfield Museum of Art, 1930 R. St., Bakersfield, CA. COST: $20 for Water Association of Kern County members, $25 non-members. TO REGISTER: https://calmutuals.org/wp-content/uploads/TCP-Panel.pdf

DATE: 5/23. TIME: 8-12PM. EVENT: California Financing Coordinating Committee. LOCATION: UC Cooperative Extension, 2145 Wardrobe Avenue, Merced, California 95341. COST: FREE. TO REGISTER: https://www.events.rcac.org/images/rcac/pdfs/cfcc_flyer_2018.pdf


April 2018 CWLN Newsletter

 

Announcements


Don’t miss our next Network Briefing:  Thursday, May 24th 4-5pm

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. As a reminder, we changed service providers which means, we have a new conference call phone number and passcode. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.


CWC is hiring canvassers!

Community Water Center is launching a campaign to engage thousands of voters in Tulare County this spring to ensure safe and affordable drinking water for all. We're looking for motivated individuals who desire to help transform their community and region. This is a 10-14 day campaign from mid-May to early June. The team will work five days per week (tentatively Wednesday through Friday from 3:30pm-8:30pm, and Saturdays and Sundays from 11:00am to 4:00pm). Hours and days may change depending on candidates' availability and learned best practices.

Please review the job description and share it widely with anyone you think may be interested in the canvassing position!

To apply, please submit the application form to vanessa.michel@communitywatercenter.org and write “COC position -- [Your name]” in the email subject line, or submit the job form in person at the CWC Office in Visalia (900 West Oak Ave, Visalia, CA). For questions regarding this position, please email vanessa.michel@communitywatercenter.org.


CWC is hiring a Director of Organizing!

Community Water Center is looking to hire a Director of Organizing that will be primarily responsible for leading CWC’s organizing, base-building, and power-building  programs and activities. We are looking for candidates that are seasoned community organizers, strategic campaign planners, and experienced staff managers. We seek a candidate with grassroots, labor, or political organizing experience, as well as experience building, leading, and managing teams. This position is a regular, full-time, exempt employee position that will be based in the Visalia office.

Please review the job description and share it widely with anyone you think may be interested in Director of Organizing the position!

To apply, email resume and cover letter to: susana.deanda@communitywatercenter.org.


Tulare County Candidate Forums

Tulare County Candidate Forum Coalition is hosting two upcoming forums, the first in Porterville on April 26, and the second in Orosi on May 3. The first forum in Porterville will have candidates for Board of Supervisors District 5 and CA State Assembly District 26. The second forum will have candidates for Board of Supervisors District 4 and CA State Senate District #14. These forums will be a great opportunity to hear local candidate responses to community members concerns and their ideas for advancing long term sustainable water solutions.

Date and time: Thursday, April 26th from 5:30-8:00PM

Location: Comision Honorifica Mexicana Americana (466 E. Putnam, Porterville, CA 93257)

Date and time: Thursday, May 3rd from 5:30-8:00PM

Location: Orosi High School Gym (41815 Rd 128, Orosi, CA 93647)


Uncontested Elections Report Summary

CWC just released a new report: "Untapped Opportunity: Local Water Boards and the Fight for Water Justice." The report found that in the southern San Joaquin Valley, 87% of local water board seats were uncontested in the most recent election -- that’s almost 500 local seats. When only one candidate runs for a seat, the seat does not appear on a ballot, and the election does not take place. In Fresno, Kern, Kings, and Tulare counties, 75 of 109 local water boards studied have not held a single election in the last four years.

Hundreds of thousands of residents in California’s unincorporated communities are served by local water boards responsible for ensuring that the community receives safe and affordable drinking water. These local water boards are key to implementing the Human Right to Water and ensuring safe, affordable drinking water for all, but CWC’s new research shows that, all too often, these water board seats -- so foundational to local democracy -- go uncontested.

With the release of this first-of-its-kind research, we kicked off efforts to share information about local water boards. In early April, we held two events -- a roundtable discussion at CSU Fresno, and a hands-on workshop at our Visalia office -- where we shared information and resources with community members, local leaders, and partners. If you’re interested in learning more about our research -- or if you’re a current water board member interested in getting involved -- please email Adriana Renteria (adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org) or call our Sacramento office at 916-706-3346.


Representation on Water Board Elections Roundtable

Water_board_elections_roundtablepanel.jpg

(left to right) Samuel Molina, Mi Familia Vota; Lucy Hernandez, West Goshen Mutual Water Company; Arturo Rodriguez and his daughter, Poplar Community Services District; 

On April 7th CWLN hosted a roundtable focused on water board elections, representation in water boards and on some of the challenges board members face. Our panelists, Lucy Hernandez from the West Goshen Mutual Water Company and Arturo Rodriguez from the Poplar Community Services District shared about their motivations for joining their water boards, the challenges they have faced as board members, and on the importance for community members to be involved with their water board consistently— not just during times of crisis or rate increases. Mindy Romero from the California Civic Engagement Project shared results from her forthcoming report on the representation of Latinos and women on water boards and on Latino voter turnout in water board elections in Tulare, Kings, Kern, and Fresno Counties. The report found that though 65% of residents living in unincorporated communities were people of color, less than 15% of local water board members are Latino and percentages for women were lower. Kristin Dobbin UC Davis PhD candidate and former CWC staff presented on Charlotte Wiener’s research on uncontested water boards seats and shared the results mentioned in the above paragraph.  We ended the roundtable with a few next steps for attendees:

  1. Need to advance public understanding of water boards and of the importance of community engagement with board
  2. Get engaged in the local water board voting process (vote, help register others to vote, share voting information, etc)
  3. Run in a water board election yourself and make a direct change in your community
  4. Support board members once they join boards in order to ensure that they have the resources and support necessary to be successful in that new leadership position

How to Run in a Water Board Election

Following our roundtable on representation on water boards, CWLN hosted a hands on workshop that delved into the local water board election process. CWC gave an overview of the different types of water providers and explained differences in their governance structures. Participants shared what they knew about local water board member responsibilities and also listed the responsibilities that community members have in holding their water board accountable. We walked through the process and went over the documents needed to run in a water board election for a Community Services District and a Public Utilities District, two of the most common special districts that provide drinking water. On our website you can access the materials CWC shared with workshop attendees and are free to share them with anyone who may be interested in being a water board member themselves. Some of the materials on our website include:

  • Getting Involved in Your Local Water Board: An Overview — factsheet going over local water boards and why joining is important
  • Getting Involved in Your Local Water Board: How to Run in a Water Board Election — provides an overview of the process for filing for candidacy for Community Services Districts and Public Utilities Districts
  • 2018 Open Seats & Vacancies — spreadsheet with information on the number of open seats in several special districts in Fresno, Kern, Kings, and Tulare Counties
  • Visit our website to check it out: https://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_board_elections

 


Drinking Water Vulnerability Assessment Web Tool Kick off meeting

The Community Water Center received an award from the Department of Water Resources 2017 Groundwater Sustainability Planning and Projects Solicitations grant. A portion of this grant is intended to support the development of a publicly accessible, webtool which will map communities whose drinking water sources are vulnerable to changes in groundwater conditionsCWC’s primary goal is that this tool will be useful for groundwater management decision makers to proactively address community drinking water needs in their groundwater planning efforts. In particular, we aim for this tool to be used by groundwater sustainability agencies in the creation of groundwater sustainability plans. GSAs can use the tool to better understand which communities within their jurisdiction are vulnerable to drinking water issues and will be able to propose practices and projects to protect against further lowering and degradation of groundwater. On April 10th we held a kick off meeting with several stakeholders to receive feedback on the type of questions the tool should answer and on the type of data sets that should be included. We are still in the process of hearing from different stakeholders what type of tool would be most useful for their groundwater planning needs so if you have any feedback or would like to learn more, please let Adriana know.


CWC hosting CV SALTS Presentations

CV SALTS stands for Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long Term Solutions and is a coalition of agricultural, industry, regulatory, and environmental justice groups that have been doing studies for over 10 years to create a plan for how to address nitrate and salinity in the Central Valley. CWC, with a grant from the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), has prepared an educational PowerPoint presentation about groundwater quality and potential funding sources to address water quality issues. Specifically, it describes the CV SALTS process that examined nitrate and salinity contamination in Northern Tulare County. CWC will be making presentations to various stakeholders groups throughout the year. If you think your water board or city council would benefit from learning more about this process of addressing nitrates and salinity, please let us know.


Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) Updates

On April 24th the Department of Water Resources (DWR) hosted a SGMA Assistance workshop in Clovis. If you were unable to attend, you can participate in a webinar that will be going over this information on April 27th from 12—2pm. Register online at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sgma-assistance-workshops-tickets-44561329135

At the workshop, DWR gave an overview of their existing resources and launched a few new tools. Below are quick summaries, to learn more visit: https://www.water.ca.gov/Programs/Groundwater-Management

  • Both Facilitation Support Services (FSS) and Technical Support Services (TSS) are accepting applications on a rolling basis and are prioritizing critically overdrafted basins. If your basin is interested in receiving support coordinating MOUs, developing outreach plans, support with monitoring well installations, or for trainings on measuring groundwater levels, contact Amanda Peisch-Derby at Amanda.Peisch@water.ca gov. To learn more about these services, visit: https://www.water.ca.gov/Programs/Groundwater-Management/Assistance-and-Engagement  
  • SGMA Data Viewer – At this workshop DWR launched their new web tool which allows GSAs to access groundwater related information on one openly accessible mapping tool. The tool is organized by the 6 undesirable results of SGMA and GSAs can layer the datasets relevant to each undesirable to get a better picture of their basin. Once the data layers are chosen, a user can zoom into their basin and download the data. The data viewer also includes a new natural communities layer that maps vegetation and wetlands and allows you to see which ecosystems are reliant on groundwater. Explore the tool here: https://sgma.water.ca.gov/webgis/?appid=SGMADataViewer 
  • C2VSIM-FG Model (California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model-Fine Grid Model) –is a model that is widely used by planning agencies, including Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs), to be able to model the movement of groundwater. This model is based on historical inflows and precipitation, and land and crop use to simulate a response to projected future stresses, like droughts. DWR will be releasing the Fine Grid (FG) model which is an update of the C2VSIM model that includes improved data quality. The beta version will be released in late April and the final release will be fall 2018. 
  • Lastly, as a reminder: under subarticle 1 of the Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) regulations, GSAs are required to include landuse planning information to develop GSPs. This includes city and county general plans and can also include any planning for growth your water system may be anticipating. Be sure you’re sharing your general plan with your GSA’s technical advisory committee or work with your county representative to ensure future landuse planning in your community is accounted for in your GSP.

 

First Annual Groundwater Sustainability Summit

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) is collaborating with the Groundwater Resources Association to host the First Annual Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) Summit that will serve as a forum for GSA members to network and connect on technical and policy issues to address Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) implementation.  To find out more information and register click here.

Dates: June 6-June 7, 2018

Location: Hilton Sacramento Arden West, Sacramento, CA

Cost: $565


Featured resource of the month: Groundwater teaching materials for K-12

The Department of Water Resources offers a variety of free materials including worksheets, activity books, posters, videos, and curriculum guides to classroom teachers, homeschoolers, and non-formal educators. These resources include publications about groundwater. Most materials are available both in hardcopy and electronically. Resources include:

  • Groundwater: An Essential Part of California’s Water Budget - Poster
  • KIDS: Discover Groundwater and Springs
  • All About Water K-3 Water Activities

For more information or to order materials, visit DWR’s education website, or water safety webpage, or library.


Grant opportunities for water providers: WaterSMART Grants

The Department of Interior is currently accepting applications for three available grants. Eligible entities for the grants are: States, Indian tribes, irrigation districts, water districts, or other organizations with water or power delivery authority located in the Western United States or United States Territories as identified in the Reclamation Act of June 17, 1902, as amended. Below is more information on each grant:

Water and Energy Efficiency Grants for FY18 – $16 million

  • Applications Due: May 10, 2018
  • This grant provides funding for projects that result in quantifiable water savings and support broader water reliability benefits. These projects conserve and use water more efficiently; increase the production of hydropower; mitigate conflict risk in areas at a high risk of future water conflict; and accomplish other benefits that contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States.
  • For more information, visit the funding opportunity description: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=301904

Water Marketing Strategy Grants for FY18 – $3 million

  • Applications Due: July 17, 2018
  • This grant supports collaborative planning efforts to develop water markets that will proactively address water supply reliability and increase water management flexibility. Water markets between willing buyers and sellers can be used to help water users meet demands efficiently in times of shortage, thereby helping to prevent water conflicts. By encouraging collaboration and input to the planning process from a range of stakeholders, this FOA will expand the lines of communication between Reclamation and local communities, and among the community stakeholders themselves, restoring community trust.
  • For more information, visit the funding opportunity description: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=301914

Small-Scale Water Efficiency Project for FY18 – $75,000

  • Applications Due: July 31, 2018
  • This grant supports specific small-scale water efficiency projects that have been prioritized through planning efforts led by the applicant. These projects conserve and use water more efficiently; mitigate conflict risk in areas at a high risk of future water conflict; and accomplish other benefits that contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States.
  • For more information, visit the funding opportunity description: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=301905

Upcoming events

Date: 4/27. Time: 12Pm-2PM. Event: DWR SGMA Assistance Workshop. Location: ONLINE. Cost: Free. More info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sgma-assistance-workshops-tickets-44561329135 

Date: 5/10. Time: 6PM-8PM. Event: AB54: Ethics Training For Mutual Water Companies. Location:  Hampton Inn and Suites 1100 N. Cheery Street, Tulare, California 93274. Cost: FREE. More info: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1284

Date: 5/17. Time: 10AM-12PM. Event: What you need to know about the new Groundwater Management Act. Location: ONLINE. Cost: FREE. More info: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1260.

Date: 5/17. Time: 10AM-12PM. Event: Best practices in the Home Inspection Process. Location: ONLINE. Cost: $25. More info: https://www.events.rcac.org/images/rcac/pdfs/051718%20Best%20Practices%20Home%20Inspection%20ONLINE.pdf.

Date: 5/23. 8:30AM-3:30PM. Event: AB54 & AB1234 en Espanol. Location: Wyndham Visalia 9000 W Airport Dr. Visalia, California 93277. Cost: FREE. More info: https://www.events.rcac.org/images/rcac/pdfs/SRFCA%20Brochure%202018%20Jan-June.pdf.



Community Water Center · 900 W Oak Ave, Visalia, CA 93291, United States 
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February 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Thank you for coming to the Water Justice Leadership Awards!

water_leaders.jpgWater Justice Leadership award recipients, Jim Maciel, Isabel Arrollo, and Senator Monning, posing with Laurel Firestone.

We wrapped up the day with our fourth annual Water Justice Leadership Awards at the Tequila Museo Mayahuel in Downtown Sacramento. The event honored State Senator Bill Monning, Armona Community Services District Board Member Jim Maciel, and El Quinto Sol de America for all of their work to ensure more equitable communities with access to safe and affordable drinking water. We had a blast! Thank to you everyone who joined us in celebrating the movement for water justice, and a big thank you to our generous sponsors who made this event possible! See pictures from the Awards here.


Announcements:

 

Adriana will be out of the office until March 19th and won’t have access to phone or email. If you have any questions or need to reach out to someone in the meantime, please reach out to CWC Co-Director Laurel Firestone at laurel.firestone@communitywatercenter.org or 916-706-3346.  


Welcome to the Community Water Leaders Network, Jose Ornelas!

jose.jpg

Jose Ornelas has been a city councilmember for the City of San Joaquin for 3 years and is also a participant in the Water Education for Latino Leaders program. Jose is the President of Ornelas Group Inc. where he serves as an immigration consultant, and prepares legal documents. He graduated from Fresno State and Kaplan University with a degree in Math and Associate of Science in Paralegal Studies. He has lived in the Fresno area for over 25 years and is an active member of his community. Jose was interested in joining the Community Water Leaders Network because he is interested in continuing to learn how to address his community’s water issues and continuing to lead in addressing the health of his community. We are excited to have Jose join the CWLN!


Don’t miss our next Network Briefing: Thursday, March 22nd from 4-5PM  

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. As a reminder, we changed service providers which means, we have a new conference call phone number and passcode. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.

Agenda:

  • member updates and questions
  • regional & state updates
  • monthly discussion topic: preparing for drought and identifying vulnerabilities

Upcoming Community Water Leaders Network events:

 

1st Roundtable: Representation on Water Boards

Date: Saturday, April 7th 2-4pm

Location: Fresno State, Fresno, CA

At this event, Mindy Romero, Director of the Civic Engagement Project at the UC Davis Center for Regional Change, will be sharing results of a report she authored exploring the representation of Latinxs and women as Directors on water boards as well as exploring Latinx voter turnout in water board elections. Romero’s research will present both statewide results as well as results for the specific counties of Kings, Kern, Fresno, and Tulare. CWC will also be presenting research on uncontested water board elections. Following the research presentations, a small panel of water board directors will share about their perspectives on the topics of inclusion, representation, and importance of community participation in water board elections. Hope to see you there!

 

2nd Roundtable: How to Run on a Water Board Election

Date: Saturday, April 14th, time TBD

Location: CWC Office, 900 W. Oak Ave. Visalia, CA 93291

This event will focus on the importance and power water boards hold in being able to implement the Human Right to Water in their community and will explain the process of running in a water board election. Participants will leave the event with knowledge of water board director responsibilities and duties, requirements for candidacy, and will better understand the process of applying to run in an election. Participants will be given tools and resources to begin the water board election candidacy process if interested. This is a smaller-scale event and RSVPs will be required.


CWC offering CV SALTS presentations

With funding from a grant from the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), the Community Water Center developed a PowerPoint presentation on the Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long Term Sustainability (CV SALTS). This program addresses nitrate and salinity contamination in groundwater in the Central Valley. The presentation describes the CV SALTS process that shows levels of groundwater contamination, projected future conditions, projects to remediate contamination and the process to implement action to address nitrate and salinity contamination of groundwater. CWC developed presentations both for technical audiences (like water boards) and for the general public. CWC has also prepared Spanish versions of the presentations. We are currently looking for interested groups that would like to have us give this presentation. If your board is interested in learning more about this process, please contact Adriana Renteria.


Regional and State Updates:

East Porterville Water Supply Project

On February 6, the final household connection was completed as part of the East Porterville Water Supply project in response to California’s recent epic drought which disproportionately impacted low income communities of color. This landmark project involved many coordinating agencies, organizations, and contractors to extend reliable water service to 755 properties in East Porterville from the City of Porterville’s municipal water system, including approximately 300 properties whose wells failed during the drought, and many others who may have been at risk of contaminated groundwater. In addition, funds were recently approved to connect more than 80 additional properties located within city limits who still depended on domestic wells. More work is still ongoing to secure the system’s capacity, but thousands of residents now can count on a reliable water supply for their homes! Check out this video from the Department of Water Resources that shares a little more about the project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiPYl4c5VxE


Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) Order Adopted

 

On February 7th, the State Water Resources Control Board held an adoption hearing for the East San Joaquin Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) Order. The ILRP Order sets forth a number of new regulatory requirements for irrigated agriculture to promote best management practices and to protect groundwater quality. One major new addition to the Order is a requirement to create groundwater protection targets. These targets will look at how much nitrates can be added to a crop under specific conditions (ie crop type, soil type, precipitation rates, weather conditions, etc.) and not result in groundwater degradation. While currently these targets will not be enforceable they will provide feedback on what crops in what conditions are likely causing nitrate contamination of groundwater. The Order also requires on-farm domestic well testing and the results must be reported to GeoTracker. The majority of the requirements in this Order are precedential to all other ILRP Orders across the state, requiring all other Orders to be revised within five years.


California Water Fix update:

 

The California Water Fix, formerly known as the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, is a project that would build infrastructure to carry water from the Northern Delta to the existing aqueduct system where the State Water Project takes most of its water. In order to update the existing delivery system, a large underground tunnel will be built to get the water from the Sacramento Delta to the pumps that send the water to San Joaquin Valley agriculture and to Southern California. Earlier this month, the Governor announced that the project would be scaled down from two tunnels to one. Water users who will be paying for the expensive project are considering if they want to participate. In the San Joaquin Valley, the water that is brought in through the State Water Project is only used for agriculture. The California Water Fix may make San Joaquin Valley agricultural water somewhat more reliable, but it will not be a big increase in water supply. To read the latest memo from the Department of Water Resources, visit this link: https://www.water.ca.gov/LegacyFiles/docs/DWR%20ltr%20to%20PWAs%20participating%20in%20WaterFix%20Feb%207%202018.pdf


Featured resource of the month

  • Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) report and web portal

Under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, Groundwater Sustainability Agencies are required to identify and consider impacts to groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs). In recognizing a lack of available data and information for how to properly address this, The Nature Conservancy created tools so that GSAs can efficiently incorporate and address GDEs in their Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs). This month, TNC released a report that gives guidance to Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) for how to address groundwater dependent ecosystems in their plans and meet the SGMA requirements. Along with the report, TNC launched a web portal that visually provides an introduction to groundwater dependent ecosystems and shows how they can be affected by excessive groundwater pumping. Visit the web portal at: groundwatercalifornia.org

Access the report at: https://www.scienceforconservation.org/assets/downloads/GDEsUnderSGMA.pdf

 

  • Drinking Water Resource Guide for Environmental Justice and Disadvantaged Communities of the Central Valley and Central Coast of California

This month, the State Water Board’s Office of Public Participation released this new educational resource. This bilingual English and Spanish guide is intended to provide citizens with information regarding: common contaminants, testing private wells, funding for safe drinking water, pollution of drinking water in rural communities, and much more. This is a great refresher for water board members and a great resource to be able to share with community members. Access the guide here: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/publications_forms/publications/general/docs/drinking_water_ej_resource_guide.pdf.


Upcoming events:

Date: February 27. Time 11:30-12:30. What Challenges Do Different Sizes & Types of Systems Face. Location: Online. Cost: Free. For more info: https://calmutuals.org/event/free-webinar-what-challenges-do-different-sizes-types-of-systems-face/  

Date: February 27. Time: 11am-12:30. Small Systems Funding. Location: Online. Cost: free. To register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3552068359475264001           

Date: February 22. Time: 10AM-12PM. What You Need to Know about the New Groundwater Management Act. Location: Online. Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1246    

Date: February 23. Time: 8:30-5PM.  Water Foundation Water 101. Location: McGeorge School of Law in Classroom C, 3200 5th Ave, Sacramento, CA, 95817. Cost: $225 + fees. More info: http://www.watereducation.org/foundation-event/water-101-workshop-basics-and-beyond-1     

Date: March 5. Time: 6-8PM. AB 54 Webinar— Mutual Water Company training. Location: Online. Cost: $99 for non-Cal Rural Water Association members, $65 for members. More info: https://calruralwater.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/AB54.2017.COMPLETE.fillable.pdf

Date: March 6. Time: 10AM-12PM. Budgeting. Location: Online. Cost: Free. For more info: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1251

Date: March 8. Time: 10AM-12PM. Distribution O&M and Math. Location: Online. Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1252

Date: March 28. Time 10AM-12PM. Arsenic Remediation. Location: Online. Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1254

                    
Date: March 29. Time 10AM-12PM. Financial Management and Rate Setting. Location: Online.  Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1256

 

Find more events on our Community Water Leaders online calendar found at http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) Updates:

 

Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant Draft Awards Announced

On February 6th the Department of Water Resources released their draft recommendations for the Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant proposals. This grant is intended to support the goals of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) by funding projects that directly benefit severely disadvantaged communities and projects to support a Groundwater Sustainability Agency’s development of Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs). Here’s the breakdown of how the $85.8 million was distributed among 78 grant applications:

  • $16.2 million is for severely disadvantaged communities to support groundwater sustainability planning and development.
  • $69.6 million is for local agency GSP development.
  • $3.4 million is tentatively awarded to three basins. These awards will be held pending a further review of their eligibility.

Comments on the applications are being accepted until February 28th at 5pm. More information can be found here: https://www.water.ca.gov/Work-With-Us/Grants-And-Loans/Sustainable-Groundwater

Community Water Center Receives Award Through the Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) posted a draft recommendation to award CWC $614,353 under Category 1 of the Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant. Our proposal was split up in two projects; the first is to facilitate the participation of severely disadvantaged communities in sustainable groundwater planning efforts through information sharing, workshops, and through co-hosting community meetings to review draft Groundwater Sustainability Plans. CWC will be working with the following Groundwater Sustainability Agencies: East Kaweah, Kaweah Subbasin; Kings River East, Kings Subbasin; Eastern Tule JPA, Lower Tule River ID, and Pixley ID, Tule Subbasin. The second project will involve developing a drinking water vulnerability assessment web tool that groundwater decision makers will be able to utilize to identify communities that are vulnerable to groundwater depletion and extreme climate conditions, identify possible consolidation opportunities, and potential areas for recharge projects. We are looking forward to working with you all to make sure that the drinking water tool is a helpful and effective decision making tool!   

Below are some of my updates on SGMA work being done in the Tulare Lake Basin. Please keep in mind that these are my interpretations and they are not flawless. Let me know if you’d like to correct or add any information about the GSA you are participating in!


SGMA ROUNDUP

Below are some of my updates on SGMA work being done in the Tulare Lake Basin. Please keep in mind that these are my interpretations and they are not flawless. Let me know if you’d like to correct or add any information about the GSA you are participating in!

 

State news: Several new resources have come out over the last few months, here’s an overview:

+Sustainable Groundwater Planning grant: This grant is intended to support the goals of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) by funding projects that directly benefit severely disadvantaged communities and projects to support Groundwater Sustainability Agencies develop Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs). The $85.8 million was distributed among 78 grant applications. Draft recommendations were released on February 7th and the deadline to submit comments on proposals has been extended to February 28th 5pm.  More info here

+Groundwater Sustainability Plan initial notification webpage: GSAs are now required to use DWR’s mapping portal to submit their notification that they are starting to work on their Groundwater Sustainability Plans. All GSAs that submitted their notice before the map was created were added to the map. There is an option for stakeholder to post public comments on the way that the planning process is going in their GSA but unfortunately, those posted comments will not be taken into consideration when DWR reviews a GSA’s GSP. Check out the map here

+Final Stakeholder Engagement and Communication Plan Guidance Document: In January, DWR posted final version of this guide intended to help GSAs create their required Stakeholder Engagement and Communication Plans. Read it here. Their guidance document for Engagement With Tribal Governments says final on their webpage but the link send to June 2017 draft.

+Best Management Practice on Sustainable Criteria: DWR hosted three workshops on their BMP on Sustainable Criteria (one in Visalia). This BMP is intended to give GSAs guidance on how to establish criteria like “sustainability goals,” “undesirable results,” “minimum thresholds,” and “measurable objectives” for their GSPs. Still in draft form but you can check it out here. At the Visalia workshop, DWR also announced that they are currently working on 2 addendums to this BMP that would give more guidance to GSAs on how to address groundwater quality and interconnected surface waters.

+Facilitation and Support Services (FSS): DWR is still offering facilitation support to support subbasins through the development of their groundwater sustainability plans (phase 2) with: facilitating meetings, helping stakeholder outreach & education, coordination. High & medium priority basins that apply would most likely receive support. More info here

 

Other resources:

+The Nature Conservancy’s Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems (GDEs) under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA): Under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, Groundwater Sustainability Agencies are required to identify and consider impacts to groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs). In recognizing a lack of available data and information for how to properly address this, The Nature Conservancy created tools so that GSAs can efficiently incorporate and address GDEs in their Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs). This month, TNC released a report that gives guidance to Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) for how to address groundwater dependent ecosystems in their plans and meet the SGMA requirements. Along with the report, TNC launched a web portal that visually provides an introduction to groundwater dependent ecosystems and shows how they can be affected by excessive groundwater pumping. Visit the web portal at: groundwatercalifornia.org Access the report here.

 

Tulare Lake Basin Regional news: Back in late October there was a 2nd South Valley SGMA Practitioners Roundtable where  representatives from each subbasin shared updates on coordination progress, and some on individual GSA progress. Several researchers also shared their research. There will be a 3rd roundtable gathering this end of spring/early summer.  

 

Kings subbasin news: The subbasin is still working to find it’s over-draft amount, right now it’s estimated that the subbasin overdraft is 201-220K acre/feet of overdraft but they will have more accurate numbers in March. The MOU group is working to finalize a dispute resolution agreement and a cost share agreement. They are currently trying to identify water experts that can be called on for help mediating disputes. The Kings Subbasin received $1.5 million from the Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant which will cover the costs of the MOU and give each GSA the remaining 214K.

 

Kings River East:  In January, the GSA held a public hearing and a community outreach meeting to go over their proposed Prop 26 fee, which is intended to cover the cost of the development of their Groundwater Sustainability Plan. The fee proposed to adopt a nominal fee of $3,250 for agencies that do not have a significant impact on groundwater and a groundwater pumping fee of $1.45 per acre-foot for landowners within agencies pumping groundwater. The Cutler Public Utility District, East Orosi Community Services District, London Community Services District, Orosi Public Utilities District, and Sultana Community Services District, will not be paying the nominal fee individually, and instead are covered by the nominal fee that Tulare County will pay. The fee was approved at the GSA board meeting following the public hearing.  The board recently added an environmental seat to the Stakeholder Committee and is looking to fill that seat, contact Chad Wegley if you are interested in joining. cw@altaid.org

 

James ID: Haven’t heard anything new.  

 

North Fork Kings: The GSA is moving forward with having a Prop 218 election and will be having a public hearing on the proposed assessment rate on May 9 at 5:30 pm at the  Riverdale Memorial Hall located at 3085 W. Whitney Ave, Riverdale 93656. The GSA board will now also be meeting bi-monthly on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 5:30 pm at the Riverdale Community Education Center Board Room, 3160 W. Mt. Whitney Ave., Riverdale, Ca 93656.

 

Central Kings (Consolidated ID): Working with Provost & Pritchard to find overdraft for their GSA and P&P is also working to prepare a feasibility study for a Prop 218 election.  

 

South Kings GSA:   Haven’t heard anything new.  

 

North Kings River GSA:  Haven’t heard anything new.  

 

McMullin group: Provost and PRitchard has been working to develop plan chapted and has sent the chapter on groundwater conditions to the technical advisory committee for review.

 

Kaweah Subbasin:

The subbasin was awarded $1.5 million through DWR’s Sustainable Groundwater Planning Grant. The funds will support the MOU and the remaining amount will be split evenly amongst the 3 GSAs. The subbasin management team had their first meeting on January 30th where they discussed the structure of that meeting space including establishing a rotating chair where each GSA would take turns facilitating for 2 months. The management team is also considering partnering with Standford to undertake an electromagnetic survey using SkyTEM, which is a technology where an airplane flies over a field with a magnetic radar to capture the difference in conductivity. The difference in conductivity is then used to identify and map out areas of the ground, both shallow and very deep, that are confined/ unconfined. Stanford already mapped out parts of Tulare Irrigation District. This is expensive technology but DWR is interested in seeing how accurate this technology so they are offering to subsidize most of the costs leaving the Kaweah subbasin the remaining amount of 300K. DWR is also doing pilot SkyTEM projects in SLO County, Bute County, & Indian Wells County and is aiming to fly over the entire central valley and make this data publicly available in the future. For now, Kaweah is debating whether to pay for this considering the information will not be available by 2020 but would be helpful for future GSP versions.

 

Mid-Kaweah: GEI Consultants are currently working to develop their GSP. They are working with Santec to develop their communication and engagement plan and are currently in the process of undertaking a series of stakeholder interviews. The draft plan will be ready for review/approval soon.  

 

Greater Kaweah:  The GSA will be advertising about the availability of the Executive Director position soon and their goal is to have an ED in place by June/July. Santec is also doing their outreach plan. They are still working to finalize a contract with GEI.  

 

East Kaweah: Lindmoore ID  was chosen to do the administrative tasks of the GSA and they have hired a assistant. They have approved a living document version of their stakeholder communication and engagement plan and Provost & Pritchard are still working on GSA groundwater conditions.

 

Tule Subbasin: The Tule Subbasin was also awarded $1.5 million through the Sustainable Groundwater Management Gran. This award will cover the costs of developing a subbasin groundwater flow model, groundwater monitoring network, and a land subsidence monitoring network. The group is working on their coordination agreement that would set agreed on standards for how each GSA would address specific criteria in their GSPs. There has been a lot of discussion at the subbasin coordination group whether methodologies to measure groundwater quality and land subsidence in each individual GSP should be included in the coordination agreement or be addressed in a separate document. At the last meeting Thomas Harder prepared a presentation of the groundwater flow model being used, MODFLOW-OWHM “One Water Hydrologic Model”, which is the model code that the USGS is using to revise the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). They have identified an overdraft of 118,000 a/f for the subbasin. Harder is currently working on the groundwater monitoring plan and the goal is to have that ready by August 2018.

 

Lower Tule River Irrigation District: The GSA has been reviewing and approving draft chapters of plans. Their board has approved chapters on: water measurements & metering, waterbanking at the groundwater level, and groundwater credit transfers within a GSA. They are currently reviewing chapters on: transitional groundwater pumping, landowner surface water brought into the GSA, and district level groundwater recharge credits.  

 

Pixley Irrigation District: Pixley ID and LTRID meeting monthly at a groundwater planning commission meeting. See LTRID update.

 

Eastern Tule GSA: At a January GSA meeting they decided to create a closed ad-hoc committee to start drafting the plan. Since they are using the Young water market model, their GSP draft has already been created, they are going chapter by chapter and adding relevant local information. 2-3 members from each of the stakeholder and executive committee volunteered and were appointed to this ad-hoc committee to begin meeting once weekly and working through the GSP. In theory, the ad-hoc committee will then bring what they consider "difficult or controversial" issues back to the Stakeholder committee for consideration to move up the committees to the board for consideration. What criteria the ad-hoc committee will use to determine what issues are "controversial" enough to discuss in the committee/board meetings is not clear. The order of their meetings will now flow like: closed ad-hoc committee—> stakeholder committee—> executive committee —> GSA board meeting.

 

Delano-Earlimart Irrigation District: They are hosting a stakeholder outreach meeting regarding land subsidence and transitional pumping on February 23. Land subsidence happens when the ground is over pumped and the land starts sinking below elevation levels. Transitional pumping refers to the gradual reduction of pumping rather than an automatic large reduction in pumping once plans are submitted to DWR. DEID’s biggest concern is land subsidence because they are currently having trouble moving water through canals. They are advocating for a shorter transitional pumping rate (or perhaps no transitional pumping at all --can’t remember) to address land subsidence faster. They will also start translating their monthly newsletter into Spanish soon!

 

Tri-County GSA: Their technical advisory committee and their stakeholder advisory committee had their first meetings on January 23.  

 

Alpaugh GSA: A merger of Alpaugh GSA and El Rico GSA is currently being considered..  

 

Tulare County GSA:  Haven’t heard anything new.

 

Tulare Lake subbasin: Have not been participating in Tulare Lake Subbasin.

 

Alpaugh GSA: A merger of Alpaugh GSA and El Rico GSA is currently being considered.

 

Tri-County GSA: See Tule sub-basin.

 

Mid-Kings GSA: Nothing new that I know of.  

 

South Fork Kings GSA: The board met at the start of February for a presentation on groundwater modeling by Geosyntec Consultants and to approve an agreement to share data and information with Westlands Water District and North Fork Kings GSA. South Fork Kings GSA, Mid-Kings GSA, El Rico, Southwest GSA, and Tri-County GSA submitted a comment letter to the Kings County Board of Supervisors opposing the proposed groundwater exportation ordinance.  

 

Southwest Kings GSA: South Fork Kings GSA, Mid-Kings GSA, El Rico, Southwest GSA, and Tri-County GSA submitted a comment letter to the Kings County Board of Supervisors opposing the proposed groundwater exportation ordinance.  

 

El Rico GSA: Currently considering including Alpaugh GSA in the El Rico GSA. They put a pause on the Prop 218 elections until/ if the merger with Alpaugh happens. They also submitted their intent to prepare a GSP notice.

 

Kern subbasin: Have not been participating in the Kern Subbasin.

 

Westside subbasin: The westside subbasin is completely covered by the Westside GSA.

 

Westlands Water District GSA: In December they hosted a public workshop on Sustainable Management Criteria and in early February they held a workshop to go over their GSP conceptual outline and on their groundwater management guiding principles.

 

Disclaimer: The proceeding interpretations and opinions are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of others involved. Additionally, my SGMA knowledge is neither exhaustive nor flawless, if you have any corrections to make to these updates or if you have more information to add, please send me an email and I will send out addendums as needed.


Do you have any questions about this newsletter or the Community Water Leaders Network?

Contact Adriana Renteria at 559-733-0219 or adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org


January 2018 CWLN Newsletter

Announcements:

Happy New Year Community Water Leaders!

As a reminder, the January Network Briefing call is cancelled. Members of the Community Water Leaders Network Steering Committee will be meeting on Friday, February 9th from 4-6:30PM in the Visalia office, 900 W Oak Ave, Visalia, CA.  If you’re interested in joining the steering committee meeting to give input on 2018 CWLN goals and priorities, please let me know!

 

Water Justice Leadership Awards

Date: Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

Time: 5:30-8:00PM

Location: Mayahuel, 1200 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

Join us as we come together with community partners, legislative allies, and ally organizations that have all contributed to the water justice movement, like yourself! There will be a short awards ceremony followed by an opportunity to connect with Sacramento partners over food and drinks. At the event, we will highlight the Community Water Leaders Network and will recognize members as a collective group on stage. More information on tickets can be found here. Look forward to seeing you all!

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Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Disadvantaged Community (DAC)

Involvement Grant update

The Prop 1 Integrated Regional Water Management (IRWM) Disadvantaged Community Involvement Grant awarded $3.4million to the Tulare-Kern region to support the involvement of disadvantaged communities in IRWM planning efforts. IRWM planning groups are voluntary collaborations between local agencies to promote regional water management efforts and to implement different water projects.

 

The County of Tulare, who is the lead applicant for this grant, has sent the revised grant agreement for the Disadvantaged Community Involvement Program grant to the State Water Board and the agreement is scheduled to be signed in late February. Once the the agreement is signed, DAC representatives from 7 IRWM groups will form a Project Advisory Committee that will help give guidance to the grant goals and potential projects. The 7 IRWM groups involved in this grant effort are: Kaweah River Basin IRWM Group, Kern County IRWM Group, Kings Basin Water Authority, Poso Creek IRWM Group, Southern Sierra IRWM Group, Tule River Basin IRWM Group, Westside-San Joaquin IRWM Group. Counties and environmental justice groups, like CWC, are also involved in this grant. The first meeting of the PAC is likely to take place in March.

 

While the PAC is waiting to be formed, now is a great time to revisit the Tulare Lake Basin DAC Study and review the list of recommendations outlined in the report.

 


Governor Brown’s Proposed Budget Water Highlights

We started the year off on a positive note with the Governor Brown’s proposed budget prioritizing water interests! In the proposed budget Governor Brown prioritizes California’s commitment to safe and affordable drinking water consistent with the policy framework of SB 623. This commitment includes $4.7 million for the State Water Board and the Department of Food and Agriculture to take steps towards implementing the Safe and Affordable Drinking Water Fund. While we still have more work to do to continue building momentum in support of SB 623, having the states priorities aligned with our efforts signifies a positive turning point!

 

Addition water highlights included in the proposed budget include:

  • Safe Drinking Water Projects -- $63 million from SB 5 for the State Water Board to provide grants to public water systems in disadvantaged communities for infrastructure improvements to meet safe and affordable drinking water standards, including both drinking water and wastewater treatment projects. Of this amount, $27 million is available to improve regional water supply within the San Joaquin River watershed.
  • SGMA Implementation -- $61.8 million from SB 5 for DWR to support groundwater sustainability agencies through three key efforts: (1) providing technical assistance to aid in the development and evaluation of their plans, (2) supplementing existing planning grants to support a groundwater sustainability agency's responsibility to define a path to achieve sustainable groundwater management, and (3) providing grants directly supporting implementation of groundwater projects
  • Groundwater Treatment—$84 million from SB 5 for the State Water Board to support regional groundwater treatment and remediation activities that prevent or reduce contamination of groundwater that serves as a source of drinking water, including $10 million for technical assistance for drought and groundwater investments.

Access the full proposed budget here: http://www.ebudget.ca.gov/FullBudgetSummary.pdf

 


CWC hosting CV SALTS Presentations

CV SALTS stands for Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long Term Solutions and is a coalition of agricultural, industry, regulatory, and environmental justice groups that have been doing studies for over 10 years to create a plan for how to address nitrate and salinity in the Central Valley. CWC, with a grant from the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), has prepared an educational PowerPoint presentation about groundwater quality and potential funding sources to address water quality issues. Specifically, it describes the CV SALTS process that examined nitrate and salinity contamination in Northern Tulare County. CWC will be making presentations to various stakeholders groups throughout the year. If you think your water board or city council would benefit from learning more about this process of addressing nitrates and salinity, please let Adriana know.


State and Legislative updates:

2017 was the first year of the two year 2017-2018 legislative session. The Legislature considered a total of 2,980 bills during 2017 dealing with almost every topic imaginable. A small but meaningful number of those bills were related to various aspects of water. Any bills that do not pass during the first legislative year and that are not procedurally held from moving forward become what is known as “two-year” bills, and are eligible for consideration again in 2018. An example of a two-year bill is SB 623. A number of legislative proposals considered in 2017 will likely come back again in 2018, and multiple entirely new legislative proposals will be introduced as well. CWC will share further information about any critical water bills as they are introduced in the coming weeks.


State Water Board in process of adopting East San Joaquin Coalition Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) Order

As a refresher, the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) regulates irrigated agriculture in California to reduce or prevent water contamination due to farming practices. Over the years CWC and the AGUA Coalition have stayed closely involved in the ILRP process as several San Joaquin Valley communities have lacked safe drinking water due to ongoing nitrate contamination, some for decades.


The State Water Board is wrapping up the process to adopt a revised ILRP Order for the East San Joaquin Coalition Order, which manages irrigated lands in the East San Joaquin Watershed. Most, but not all, of the East San Joaquin Order is precedential. What this means is that all of the concepts identified as precedential that will be adopted in the East San Joaquin Coalition Order also have to be included in all other ILRP Orders throughout the state. There is an adoption hearing on February 7th in Sacramento and we will continue to work alongside our community partners and allies to ensure a strong Order that will result in the continued sustainability of the Central Valley. A map of the ILRP Coalitions is shown below and the East San Joaquin Order is identified as 5 in green.

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Map of ILRP Coalition Boundaries.


Ruling on Prop 26 May Affect SGMA Implementation –

City of Buenaventura v. United Water Conservation District


At the start of December, the California Supreme Court issued a new ruling on Prop 26 which provides some guidance on how groundwater fees may be assessed and appears to provide protections for non-agricultural groundwater users. As background, Prop 26 was passed after Prop 218 in order to increase the protection for voters from tax increases by local agencies. Prop 218 provides that before taxes or fees related to property ownership (such as water or sewer fees) are increased they must be subject to voter approval and must be proportional to cost of service. Prop 26 expands the definition of “tax” to include any charge by a local government, not specifically limited to those charges related to property ownership. Charges that confer a special benefit to someone for a governmental service or product, as opposed to general revenue raising, are not subject to Prop 26 so long as they bear fair or reasonable relationship to the benefit to the person paying the fees. The aftermath of these two propositions is that taxes are defined as something which is for general revenue raising purposes, whereas a fee is related to a specific benefit given to the payer.

In the recent case, the City of Ventura sued the local water conservation district arguing the groundwater fees imposed upon the City by the District were in violation of both Prop 218’s requirement that fees are proportional to cost of service and in violation of Prop 26’s requirement that fees “bear a fair or reasonable relationship to the benefit to the payer”. The fees imposed on the City by the District were created to be in compliance with Water Code Section 75594 which states conservation districts cannot charge agricultural groundwater users less than three times and no more than five times the fees imposed on non-agricultural users. The Court held that the Prop 218 argument was not relevant since the fees were not related to the City’s property ownership, but instead held that the groundwater fees paid by the City to the District are subject to Prop 26 and sent the case back to the appeals court to determine if the fees do “bear a fair or reasonable relationship” to the benefit the City receives from the District.

How this impacts SGMA is still murky, however, there are a few key points that can be taken from the case: 1) Groundwater charges not-related to property ownership are not subject to Prop 218 and instead are covered by the less demanding Prop 26; 2) Previously Prop 26 was interpreted to mean that fees must comply on a parcel by parcel basis but the Court grants local governments a measure of flexibility in setting fees, stating when a district is implementing a “statutorily mandated conservation program, cost allocations for services provided are to be judged by a standard of reasonableness with some flexibility permitted to account for systemwide complexity.’”[emphasis added] Meaning similar users could be grouped together for the sake of setting fees. 3) The court hinted that Water Code Section 75594’s requirement that agricultural groundwater rates must be at least three times less than other uses (three-to-one rule) may violate Prop 26, but declined to rule on the matter, leaving the door open for another lawsuit. If at a later date the three-to-one rule is determined to be in violation of Prop 26, this will make it very difficult, if not impossible, to charge agricultural users of groundwater less than other users. Finally, since SGMA authorizes different types of fees and charges, GSAs will need to analyze their proposed fees to determine what type of fee or charge it is and thus whether Prop 218 or Prop 26, if either, apply.


Featured Resource of the Month –

Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) Initial Notification System

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) has released a new tool called the Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GSP) Initial Notification System. Groundwater Sustainability Agencies (GSAs) have to use this system to send the notification that they intend to start working on their plan. So far 31 GSAs have begun working on their GSPs and the majority of GSAs in the Southern San Joaquin Valley have already submitted notifications. The public can also use this tool to publicly share comments or concerns related to their Groundwater Sustainability Agency’s GSP development process. When a public comment is posted, it can be seen on the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) Portal and it will be shared with the GSA, the DWR Regional Office, and the DWR Sacramento Office. All comments must be related to the GSP development process. If you have concerns about your GSA’s GSP development process and you have voiced your concerns with your GSA and have not seen efforts to address your concerns, you can use this tool to publically keep a record of the issue. Alternatively, also feel free to contact Adriana anytime you have concerns as well.

To learn more about this tool, visit DWR’s webpage: http://water.ca.gov/groundwater/sgm/gsp_in.cfm  


Upcoming events:

Date: 1/31. Time: 8AM-12PM. Event: Grant Funding and Infrastructure Planning. Location: Arvin (location TBD). Cost: $175 for non-Cal Rural Water Association members. More info: https://calruralwater.org/product/grant-funding-and-infrastructure-planning-2/

Date: 2/1. Time: 10AM-12PM. Event: Financial Management Small Water Systems. Location: Online. Cost:Free. More info here: https://www.events.rcac.org/images/rcac/pdfs/SRFCA%20Brochure%202018%20Jan-June.pdf

Dates: 2/7-2/8. Time: 8AM-3PM. Event: USABlueBook Water Treatment and Distribution. Location: Visalia (Location TBD). Cost: $175 for non-Cal Rural Water Association members. More info here: https://calruralwater.org/product/usabluebook-water-treatment-and-distribution-tools/


Date: 2/15. Time: 10AM-12PM. Event: Creating Operation and Maintenance Plans. Location: Online. Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1244


Date: 2/22. Time: 10AM-12PM. Event: What You Need to Know about the New Groundwater Management Act. Location: Online. Cost: Free. Register here: https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1246


Date: 2/23. Time: 8:30-5PM. Event: Water Foundation Water 101. Location: McGeorge School of Law in Classroom C, 3200 5th Ave, Sacramento, CA, 95817. Cost: $225 + fees. More info: http://www.watereducation.org/foundation-event/water-101-workshop-basics-and-beyond-1

 

Find more events on our Community Water Leaders online calendar found at:

http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


Reminders:

1-2-3 TCP Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) In Effect

On December 14, 2017, the State Water Board approved an early effective date for the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of contaminant 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), which is the cancer causing chemical that has caused contamination of California soil since the 80s due to extensive application of soil fumigants manufactured by Dow and Shell Chemicals. Water systems are required to start quarterly monitoring for 1,2,3-TCP in the calendar quarter beginning January 2018. Water systems may be allowed to use previously collected samples for up to three quarters in order to meet the initial monitoring requirements. More information about initial monitoring substitutions can be found in Subsection 64445(i) or by contacting your local Division of Drinking Water District Office.

If your system is impacted by 123-TCP, in order to obtain cost recovery your system needs to obtain legal representation in order to sue the responsible parties, Shell and Dow Chemicals, for 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Robins Borghei LLP is the primary firm litigating 123 TCP cases and has a strong track record in winning cases on behalf of communities dealing with 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Litigation can take anywhere from a year to 3 or more years, so if you are impacted by 1-2-3 TCP and are in need of financial assistance to come into compliance with the new MCL, there are funding sources at the state available for eligible entities. The primary funding source is the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), and the Prop 1 Groundwater Grant Fund is also a secondary option to cover instances where the DWSRF doesn’t cover. In order to qualify for state funding sources you will likely be required to show you are initiating efforts to recover costs from the responsible parties. For any questions, contact the State Water Resources Control Board.

 

$9.5 million in grant funding available through the Drinking Water for Schools Program

This program can be used install water bottle filling stations or drinking water fountains, and for interim water supplies and treatment devices for schools where contamination is an issue. Contact Rural Community Assistance Corporation at agua4all@rcac.org for more information on how to apply.


Do you have any questions about this newsletter or the Community Water Leaders Network?Contact Kristin Dobbin at 559-733-0219 or kristin.dobbin@communitywatercenter.org


December 2017 CWLN Newsletter

Events & Announcements:

Thanks for all the work you’ve done this year to help implement the Human Right to Water. We’re thankful to have you in the Community Water Leaders Network and look forward to continuing our efforts in 2018.

As a reminder, the Community Water Center will be closed from December 23rd, 2017 until January 7th, 2018 and the December Network briefing call is cancelled. Check out a snapshot of what we accomplished in 2017 below and consider donating to support continuing efforts to secure safe and affordable water here. Have a great end of your year!

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Water Justice Leadership Awards

Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

5:30-8:00PM

Mayahuel

1200 K Street

Sacramento, CA 95814

 

Join us as we come together with community partners, legislative allies, and ally organizations that have all contributed to the water justice movement, like yourself! There will be a short awards ceremony followed by an opportunity to connect with Sacramento partners over food and drinks. At the event, we will highlight the Community Water Leaders Network and will recognize members as a collective group on stage. I will be following up as the date approaches to gather your reflections on all the great work you’ve done to support the Human Right to Water this year. More information on tickets can be found here.

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Regional and State Updates:

New Ruling on Prop 26 May Affect SGMA Implementation –

City of Buenaventura v. United Water Conservation District

At the start of December, the California Supreme Court issued a new ruling on Prop 26 which provides some guidance on how groundwater fees may be assessed and appears to provide protections for non-agricultural groundwater users. As background, Prop 26 was passed after Prop 218 in order to increase the protection for voters from tax increases by local agencies. Prop 218 provides that before taxes or fees related to property ownership (such as water or sewer fees) are increased they must be subject to voter approval and must be proportional to cost of service. Prop 26 expands the definition of “tax” to include any charge by a local government, not specifically limited to those charges related to property ownership. Charges that confer a special benefit to someone for a governmental service or product, as opposed to general revenue raising, are not subject to Prop 26 so long as they bear fair or reasonable relationship to the benefit to the person paying the fees. The aftermath of these two propositions is that taxes are defined as something which is for general revenue raising purposes, whereas a fee is related to a specific benefit given to the payer.

 

In the recent case, the City of Ventura sued the local water conservation district arguing the groundwater fees imposed upon the City by the District were in violation of both Prop 218’s requirement that fees are proportional to cost of service and in violation of Prop 26’s requirement that fees “bear a fair or reasonable relationship to the benefit to the payer”. The fees imposed on the City by the District were created to be in compliance with Water Code Section 75594 which states conservation districts cannot charge agricultural groundwater users less than three times and no more than five times the fees imposed on non-agricultural users. The Court held that the Prop 218 argument was not relevant since the fees were not related to the City’s property ownership, but instead held that the groundwater fees paid by the City to the District are subject to Prop 26 and sent the case back to the appeals court to determine if the fees do “bear a fair or reasonable relationship” to the benefit the City receives from the District.

 

How this impacts SGMA is still murky, however, there are a few key points that can be taken from the case: 1) Groundwater charges not-related to property ownership are not subject to Prop 218 and instead are covered by the less demanding Prop 26; 2) Previously Prop 26 was interpreted to mean that fees must comply on a parcel by parcel basis but the Court grants local governments a measure of flexibility in setting fees, stating when a district is implementing a “statutorily mandated conservation program, cost allocations for services provided are to be judged by a standard of reasonableness with some flexibility permitted to account for systemwide complexity.’”[emphasis added] Meaning similar users could be grouped together for the sake of setting fees. 3) The court hinted that Water Code Section 75594’s requirement that agricultural groundwater rates must be at least three times less than other uses (three-to-one rule) may violate Prop 26, but declined to rule on the matter, leaving the door open for another lawsuit. If at a later date the three-to-one rule is determined to be in violation of Prop 26, this will make it very difficult, if not impossible, to charge agricultural users of groundwater less than other users. Finally, since SGMA authorizes different types of fees and charges, GSAs will need to analyze their proposed fees to determine what type of fee or charge it is and thus whether Prop 218 or Prop 26, if either, apply.


Early Effective Date for Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for 1-2-3 Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP)

On December 14, 2017, the State Water Board approved an early effective date for the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of contaminant 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP), which is the cancer causing chemical that has caused contamination of California soil since the 80s due to extensive application of soil fumigants manufactured by Dow and Shell Chemicals. Water systems are required to start quarterly monitoring for 1,2,3-TCP in the calendar quarter beginning January 2018. Water systems may be allowed to use previously collected samples for up to three quarters in order to meet the initial monitoring requirements. More information about initial monitoring substitutions can be found in Subsection 64445(i) or by contacting your local Division of Drinking Water District Office.

 

If your system is impacted by 123-TCP, in order to obtain cost recovery your system needs to obtain legal representation in order to sue the responsible parties, Shell and Dow Chemicals, for 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Robins Borghei LLP is the primary firm litigating 123 TCP cases and has a strong track record in winning cases on behalf of communities dealing with 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Litigation can take anywhere from a year to 3 or more years, so if you are impacted by 1-2-3 TCP and are in need of financial assistance to come into compliance with the new MCL, there are funding sources at the state available for eligible entities. The primary funding source is the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), and the Prop 1 Groundwater Grant Fund is also a secondary option to cover instances where the DWSRF doesn’t cover. In order to qualify for state funding sources you will likely be required to show you are initiating efforts to recover costs from the responsible parties. For any questions, contact the State Water Resources Control Board.


Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) Public Hearing Update

Lucy.jpgCommunity Water Leader Lucy Hernandez, community residents and activists, and CWC staff who traveled to Sacramento to speak about their experience with unsafe water due to nitrate contamination.

The Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) regulates irrigated agriculture in California to reduce or prevent water contamination due to farming practices. Over the years CWC and the AGUA Coalition have stayed closely involved in the ILRP process as several San Joaquin Valley communities have lacked safe drinking water due to ongoing nitrate contamination, some for decades.

Currently the State Water Board is in the process of revising the East San Joaquin ILRP Order, which manages the irrigated lands in the East San Joaquin Watershed. A second draft Order was released this September, and on December 6th, 2017 the State Water Board held a workshop to hear comments from stakeholders and the public on the Order. CWC presented alongside allies from Leadership Counsel for Justice and Accountability, Clean Water Action, and community partners Lucy Hernandez from West Goshen and Cristobal Chavez from Porterville, on our continued concerns about the Order’s lack of enforceable targets for nitrate application and other important improvements that are needed in the Order.  We will continue to work alongside our community partners and allies to ensure a strong Order that will result in the continued sustainability of the Central Valley.


Featured resources of the month:

Financial Assistance for Water Audits                               

The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) has available funding to assist water systems implementing a water audit. Agencies can hire a consultant or work with their own staff to perform the audit. Financial assistance can cover up to a maximum of $35,000 of audit costs. Check out the application and information here: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/grants_loans/srf/docs/forms/water_energy_audit_application_instructions.pdf


$9.5 Million Available for Drinking Water in Schools                                            

The California State Water Resources Control Board has $9.5 million in grant funding available through the Drinking Water for Schools Program, which may be used to install water bottle filling stations or drinking water fountains, and for interim water supplies and treatment devices for schools where contamination is an issue. Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) are eligible to apply for these funds, including schools that serve kindergarten through 12th grade, and preschools and daycares that are located on school property. During the first nine months, the program is open only to LEAs that serve Disadvantaged Communities (DAC) with a population of less than 20,000. County offices of education are encouraged to apply on behalf of multiple small districts within their jurisdiction, which can reduce costs through joint purchasing and contracting.

If your school or district is interested in learning more about this exciting new opportunity to improve student access to safe drinking water you can access the guidelines and application here or contact Kim Hanagan, State Water Resources Control Board at (916) 323-0624.

Rural Community Assistance Corporation was selected by the State Water Resources Control Board to provide technical assistance during the grant application and implementation period. Contact us at agua4all@rcac.org for more information.


State Water Board Translations for Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR) Templates

Last May, the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) of Northern California sent a letter to the State Water Resources Control Board requesting that the State Water Board make available translated CCR templates so that public water systems could use the templates and ensure that consumers receive these reports in the required languages. Previously, the Board only provided the template in English and it became evident that many public water systems were using the exact template but not translating it themselves. Because of this, many non-English speaking communities only received the CCR in English. ACLU NC has been working with the State Water Board’s Chair to ensure the templates are translated and there are now two additional versions available: one in Spanish and one in Hmong. The Board plans to provide additional translations in 2018 but for now, water boards are encouraged to use these templates to work to ensure all members of their communities can read and understand their CCR report.


North Tulare County (NTC) Regional Water Alliance Update:

Steven.jpgMembers of the NTC Regional Alliance pictured above Katie Icho (East Orosi Community Services District), Supervisor Steven Worthley (Tulare County Board of Supervisors), and Michael Prado Sr (Sultana Community Services District).

The Alliance is a Joint Powers Agency (JPA) that includes East Orosi Community Services District, Sultana Community Services District (representing the communities of Sultana and Monson), and Tulare County (representing communities of Seville and Yettem). This JPA was formed in a collaborative effort, facilitated by CWC along with RCAC, to plan shared solutions and access financial resources for a sustainable water future for the communities of the NTC region.  

The Alliance had its second meeting on December 13th and will be selecting a Technical Assistance provider to help the Alliance conduct planning studies that can lead to a sustainable drinking water project to improve reliability of the water quality and water supply of these communities and possible other nearby communities. The first study is an Alternative Analysis that will compare various options of providing improved drinking water. The surface water treatment plant that has been under consideration for several years will be one of the alternatives. Once an alternative is selected, planning and design can move the project toward an eventual construction phase.


Upcoming Events and Trainings:

Jan 11. Water Audits as the First Part of Water Loss Control. 12:00pm-1:30pm. Online. Free. https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5814177191264844801

Jan 20. California Water Law Symposium. 8:00am-6:00pm. $60. 2299 Piedmont Ave., Berkeley, CA 94720. http://www.waterlawsymposium2018.com/.

June 6-7. First Annual Groundwater Sustainability Agency Summit. GRA Groundwater Resources Association. 2200 Harvard Street, Sacramento, CA 95815. https://www.grac.org/events/140/

 

Find more events on our Community Water Leaders online calendar found at http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


Do you have any questions about this newsletter or the Community Water Leaders Network? 
Contact Adriana Renteria at 559-733-0219 or adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org


November 2017 CWLN Newsletter

Abby_Fi..jpg(left to right) Abby Figueroa, Union of Concerned Scientists; Coreen Weintraub, UCS; Adriana Renteria, CWC; Panelists: Virginia Gurrola, Cruz Rivera, Eric Osterling, Dr. Juliet Christian Smith, and Maria Herrera, Self-Help Enterprises at toolkit release.

 

Getting Involved in Groundwater: Toolkit Release and Panel Discussion

 

On October 26th, Community Water Center (CWC), Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), and Self Help Enterprises (SHE) hosted Getting Involved with Groundwater: toolkit release and panel discussion. At this event, the Union of Concerned Scientists released their new publication, Getting Involved in Groundwater; A Guide to California’s Groundwater Sustainability Plans. The published guide, available in English and Spanish, was informed by groundwater workshops CWC & UCS hosted over the past year and was created to demystify technical language, concepts, and tools for communities implementing the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA).

 

SGMA calls for the involvement of a diverse set of stakeholders however, groundwater sustainability planning can seem very technical, which can discourage people from getting involved in the first place. Getting Involved in Groundwater goes over concepts and terms commonly associated with groundwater sustainability planning in the context of the new law and includes “critical questions” to ask which serve as a jumping off point to get more information about your local area, so that getting involved is easier.

 

At the event, the following speakers shared their perspectives on groundwater management and led a discussion on the importance of having accessible tools like the toolkit:

Dr. Joaquin Arambula, Assemblymember, California State Legislature
            Eric Osterling, Manager of Water Resources, Kings River Conservation District
            Virginia Gurrola, former city councilmember and mayor, city of Porterville
            Cruz Rivera, Vice-President, Plainview Mutual Water Company, and Community Water Leader
            Dr. Juliet Christian-Smith, toolkit co-author and Senior Program Officer, Water Foundation

 

Achieving the goals of SGMA is a big undertaking but through events like this and through sharing of resources and information like UCS’s toolkit, this process will be a lot easier. Check out the guides in English here and in Spanish here and learn more about other groundwater resources on our webpage!


Events & Announcements:

Don’t miss our next Network Briefing: Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017 4-5PM  

Reminder: No briefing call in December

Network “briefings” are monthly conference calls that provide members the opportunity to connect with each other, crowd-source questions, and receive information from the comfort of their own homes. As a reminder, we changed service providers which means, we have a new conference call phone number and passcode. To join, dial (929) 432-4463, when prompted, enter the access code 5254-59-7515 followed by the pound key (#). Let Adriana know if you need a pre-paid calling card in order to call long-distance.

Agenda:

  1. member updates and questions
  2. regional & state updates
  3. monthly discussion topic: Department of Water Resources Best Management Practice: Draft Sustainable Management Criteria & any thoughts or concerns with respect to how Groundwater Sustainability Plans being developed will impact your community

Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) update                                            

The Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program regulates irrigated agriculture to help prevent the contamination of surface water and groundwater from agricultural contaminants such as nitrates. The Community Water Center along with a few of our allies had petitioned the State Water Resources Control Board several years ago stating that the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program Order the Regional Water Board released was not strong enough to protect water quality, the State Water Board agreed and in early October it released a draft Order on the East San Joaquin ILRP Order. In most aspects it is precedential to all ILRP Orders across the state, meaning within five years all other ILRP Orders must be revised to come into compliance with the East San Joaquin Order. Right now the State Water Board is taking public comments on the draft, due December 15th at noon. There will also be a public hearing, where there will be panels and the Board will be hearing public comment in Sacramento on December 6th. An informal staff workshop where public comment will not be heard is being held on November 27th in Clovis. If you would like any additional information on the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program or the current draft Order please contact CWC’s Staff Attorney, Debi Ores at deborah.ores@communitywatercenter.org


 1-2-3 TCP (Trichloropropane) update:

The state will soon start mandatory testing for 1-2-3 TCP, the cancer causing chemical that has caused contamination of California soil since the 80s due to extensive application of soil fumigants manufactured by Dow and Shell Chemicals. While mandatory testing for 1-2-3 TCP is not required until January 1, 2018, the State Water Board strongly recommends testing before the January 1st date in order to find out if 1-2-3 TCP is an issue for your system. If your system is impacted by 123-TCP, in order to obtain cost recovery your system needs to obtain legal representation in order to sue the responsible parties, Shell and Dow Chemicals, for 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Robins Borghei LLP is the primary firm litigating 123 TCP cases and has a strong track record in winning cases on behalf of communities dealing with 1-2-3 TCP contamination. Litigation can take anywhere from a year to 3 or more years, so if you are impacted by 1-2-3 TCP and are in need of financial assistance to come into compliance with the new MCL, there are funding sources at the state available for eligible entities. The primary funding source is the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF), and the Prop 1 Groundwater Grant Fund is also a secondary option to cover instances where the DWSRF doesn’t cover. In order to qualify for state funding sources you will likely be required to show you are initiating efforts to recover costs from the responsible parties. Staff at the State Water Board can be of assistance in meeting any of the eligibility requirements.


California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) UC Water Rates Proceeding:

If your water system is regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission, it’s good to be aware that the Commission has initiated a proceeding to look at water affordability. The Commission is looking at whether it is feasible or effective to standardize the various low-income rate assistance programs, benefits to consolidation, the feasibility of taxing bottled water to subsidize water rates for low-income customers, and a number of other potential tools and solutions. More information can be found here or on the CPUC’s website.


Best Management Practice (BMP) Sustainable Management Criteria

The Department of Water Resources (DWR) released their latest best management practices guidance document for the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). The latest guidance document is on how a Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) establishes sustainable management criteria. In developing Groundwater Sustainability Plans (GSPs), GSAs must develop these sustainable criteria: sustainability goal, undesirable results, minimum thresholds, and measureable objectives. All four of these sustainable criteria are created from information derived from the Groundwater Sustainability Agency’s hydrologic conceptual model, water budget, and past and current groundwater conditions. The BMP is intended to give guidance on how to establish these criteria. Comments on the guidance document are due January 8, 2018 at 5pm. The Department of Water Resources will also be holding three stakeholder workshops across the state on the guidance document, details still to be announced. The guidance document can be found here or on DWR’s Sustainable Groundwater Management page. CWC is submitting comments and you are welcome to submit comments with us or you can submit comments on your own by emailing your comments to sgmps@water.ca.gov, subject: Comments on Draft SMC BMP.


Featured resources of the month:

 

State Water Board Translations for Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR) Templates:

Last May, the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) of Northern California sent a letter to the State Water Resources Control Board requesting that the State Water Board make available translated Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) templates so that public water systems could use the templates and ensure that consumers receive these reports in the required languages. Previously, the Board only provided the template in English and it became evident that many public water systems were using the exact template but not translating it themselves. Because of this, many non-English speaking communities only received the CCR in English. ACLU of Northern California has been working with the State Water Board’s Chair to ensure the templates are translated and there are now two additional versions available: one in Spanish and one in Hmong. The Board plans to provide additional translations in 2018 but for now, water boards are encouraged to use these templates to work to ensure all members of their communities can read and understand their CCR report.

 

Union of Concerned Scientists’ new publication for water decision makers:

Navigating a Flood of Information: Evaluating and Integrating Climate Science into Groundwater Planning in California is a white paper co-authored with Stanford University’s Water in the West program. The white paper intends to

  • Provide water managers and other decision makers across the state with an overview of climate models, their component parts, and key terminology
  • Provide a framework for evaluating and comparing the various approaches to incorporating climate change into state-level water planning documents
  • Recommend a four-step process to incorporate future climate projections into local Groundwater Sustainability Plans

$9.5 Million Available for Drinking Water in Schools

The California State Water Resources Control Board has $9.5 million in grant funding available through the Drinking Water for Schools Program, which may be used to install water bottle filling stations or drinking water fountains, and for interim water supplies and treatment devices for schools where contamination is an issue. Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) are eligible to apply for these funds, including schools that serve kindergarten through 12th grade, and preschools and daycares that are located on school property. During the first nine months, the program is open only to LEAs that serve Disadvantaged Communities (DAC) with a population of less than 20,000. County offices of education are encouraged to apply on behalf of multiple small districts within their jurisdiction, which can reduce costs through joint purchasing and contracting.

If your school or district is interested in learning more about this exciting new opportunity to improve student access to safe drinking water you can access the guidelines and application here or contact Kim Hanagan, State Water Resources Control Board at (916) 323-0624.

Rural Community Assistance Corporation was selected by the State Water Resources Control Board to provide technical assistance during the grant application and implementation period. Contact us at agua4all@rcac.org for more information.


Applications Open for Water Education Foundation 2018 Water Leaders Class

Applications are now being accepted for the 2018 William R. Gianelli Water Leaders Class. The one-year program fosters a deeper knowledge of water issues and leadership skills. Criteria for acceptance include a commitment to understanding water issues and an interest in seeking leadership roles on public boards and commissions, or key staff positions. Class members are required to attend a special January orientation at the Foundation’s Sacramento office, the Bay-Delta Tour mid-year, along with one other water tour of their choice, as well as the Executive Briefing, the Foundation’s flagship annual conference. Individual class members are also assigned a top level policy-maker, scientist or legal expert as a mentor, with whom they spend one day “shadowing” and later conduct a one-on-one interview on the class research topic. The program began in 1997 and class alums have gone on to achieve top positions at the state Legislature, government agencies, nonprofit organizations and leading private companies involved in water.

Visit http://www.watereducation.org/water-leaders for more information about the program. You can download an application form here that you can fill out on your computer. Applications are due Dec. 5, 2017 and scholarships are available. Contact Kasey Chong at kchong@watereducation.org with any questions.


Upcoming Events and Trainings:

November 22. State Water Board Workshop on Proposed Water Waste Regulation. CalEPA Headquarters Building - 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Free. https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/board_info/calendar/index.html

November 29. Water System Management and Finance for Board Members.12:00pm-1:00pm. Online. Free. http://calmutuals.org/events/month/

December 4 & December 8. AWE Distribution Operations & Maintenance. CRWA Training Headquarters, 1234 North Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. https://calruralwater.org/training-schedule/?orderby=date_asc

December 5. AB54 & AB240: Ethics For Mutual Water Company Board Members. 10AM-12PM. Online. Free. https://www.events.rcac.org/rcac/Calendar.asp

December 19. Public Hearing: Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) General Permit Amendment. 9:30AM. 1001 I Street, Second Floor, Sacramento, CA 95814. Free.  https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/board_info/calendar/index.html

December 19. Arsenic Remediation. 10AM. Online. https://www.events.rcac.org/rcac/Calendar.asp

December 20. California Water Commission Meeting. 9:30am. 1416 Ninth Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Free. http://www.watereducation.org/calendar/2017-11

 

Find more events on our Community Water Leaders online calendar found at http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


Do you have any questions about this newsletter or the Community Water Leaders Network? 
Contact Adriana Renteria at 559-733-0219 or adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org


CWLN boletin de Octubre 2017

Eventos y Anuncios:

La Creación de la Alianza Regional por el Agua en el Norte del Condado de Tulare.

sultana.pngLa semana pasada, los miembros del Distrito de Servicios Comunitarios de Sultana votaron a favor de una resolución para unirse y crear una Alianza Regional.

Después de varios años de negociación y de propuestas por parte de la comunidad, ¡nos complace anunciar que la Alianza Regional por el Agua en el Norte del Condado de Tulare se formó el 6 de octubre! La semana pasada, los miembros del Distrito de Servicios Comunitarios de la comunidad de Sultana votaron a favor de una resolución para unirse a la alianza regional. La comunidad de Sultana fue la tercera comunidad de las tres partes que conforman el Acuerdo conocido en inglés como “Joint Powers Agreement” junto con el Distrito de Servicios Comunitarios del Este de Orosi y el Condado de Tulare (que representa a Yettem y Monson), para que firmaran el Acuerdo y hacerlo oficial.

 

Esta alianza ayudará a planificar soluciones compartidas para un futuro sostenible del agua en las comunidades del Este de Orosi, Sultana, Seville, Yettem y Monson. El CWC ha trabajado con las comunidades del norte del condado de Tulare desde nuestros inicios. Por varios años, hemos brindado asistencia técnica a las partes interesadas y que están involucradas en la formación de la nueva Alianza.

 


Participe En El Manejo De Su Cuenca: Perspectiva Local

Lanzamiento de herramientas y panel de discusión

Jueves, 26 de octubre de 2017

10:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m. [almuerzo incluido]

Habitación Broadmoore, University Square Hotel

4961 N. Cedar Ave, Fresno CA 93726

sustainable_groundwater.jpgLa Ley de Manejo Sustentable de Aguas Subterráneas requiere que diversos usuarios y administradores del agua se unan para crear planes locales de sostenibilidad para el manejo de su cuenca. ¡No necesita ser un experto en los asuntos del agua para participar!

 

Las organizaciones “Union of Concerned Scientists”, “Self-Help Enterprises” y el Centro Comunitario por el Agua lo invitan a un panel de discusión sobre la planificación local de la sostenibilidad del agua subterránea y el lanzamiento de herramientas: la Participación sobre el Manejo de su Cuenca; Una guía para entender los planes de sustentabilidad de aguas subterráneas de California. El kit de herramientas analiza el proceso de algunos de los componentes técnicos  en los Planes de Manejo Sostenible de Agua Subterránea (GSP, por sus siglas en inglés) como los presupuestos y modelos de agua, el trabajo con consultores y el establecimiento de objetivos de sostenibilidad, por lo que involucrarse y trabajar juntos es más fácil.

Los oradores serán:

Dr. Joaquin Arambula, Asambleísta del Estado de California.

Eric Osterling, Gerente de Recursos Hídricos del Distrito de Conservación del Río Kings.

Virginia Gurrola, ex concejal de la ciudad y alcalde de la ciudad de Porterville.

Cruz Rivera, Vicepresidente,  de la Compañía “Plainview Mutual Water”.

Dra. Juliet Christian-Smith, coautora del kit de herramientas y directora general de programas de “Water Foundation


Participe El 28 De Octubre Con El Centro Comunitario Por El Agua Para Hablar Con Los Votantes Del Condado De Tulare Sobre Su Agua

Este mes, el CWC hablará con miles de votantes del Condado de Tulare sobre su agua. Los invitamos a que asistan a nuestra próxima reunión comunitaria para obtener más información y participar en el movimiento por la justicia del agua.

El sábado, 28 de octubre, está invitado para ser parte de nuestro equipo de voluntarios. Daremos entrenamiento a todos los interesados en participar como voluntarios en nuestra oficina de Visalia y luego nos dirigiremos a tocar puertas para realizar breves preguntas a nuestros votantes. Si está disponible el 28 de octubre de 9:30 a.m. a 2:30 p.m. y desea unirse a nuestro equipo como voluntario, llame a nuestra oficina de Visalia al 559-733-0219 o envíe un correo electrónico a Vanessa.Michel@CommunityWaterCenter.org para informarnos si está interesado.


Hay $ 9.5 Millones De Dólares Disponibles Para Que Las Escuelas Cuenten Con Agua Potable

La Mesa de Control de Recursos Hídricos del Estado de California tiene $ 9.5 millones de dólares en fondos disponibles a través del Programa de Agua Potable para Escuelas, que puede usarse para instalar estaciones para el llenado de botellas de agua o fuentes de agua potable, y para suministros de agua provisionales y dispositivos de tratamiento para escuelas donde la contaminación en el agua sea un problema. Las Agencias Educativas Locales (LEA, por sus siglas en inglés) son elegibles para solicitar estos fondos, incluyendo las escuelas que imparten clases desde el kínder hasta el grado 12, así como el nivel preescolar y guarderías que se encuentran dentro de la propiedad de la escuela. Durante los primeros nueve meses, el programa está abierto solo para las LEA que brindan servicios a comunidades de bajos ingresos (DAC, por sus siglas en inglés) con una población de menos de 20,000 estudiantes. Se hace una invitación a todas las oficinas de educación del condado a postularse y que sean parte de los distintos distritos pequeños que están dentro de su jurisdicción, lo que puede reducir los costos mediante compras en conjunto y contratación.

Si su escuela o distrito está interesado en aprender más sobre esta nueva y emocionante oportunidad de mejorar el acceso al agua potable a los estudiantes, puede acceder aquí a las solicitudes y requisitos o comuníquese con Kim Hanagan de la Mesa Estatal del Control de Recursos Hídricos al (916) 323-0624.

La Corporación “Rural Community Assistance” fue seleccionada por la Mesa Estatal del Control de Recursos Hídricos para proporcionar asistencia técnica durante la solicitud de la beca y el período de implementación. Para más información comuníquese a: agua4all@rcac.org.


Las Inscripciones Están Abiertas Para La Clase De Líderes Por El Agua Por Parte De La Fundación “Open For Water Education”

Las solicitudes están siendo aceptadas para la Clase de Líderes por el Agua, William R. Gianelli 2018. El programa que consta de un año fomenta un conocimiento más profundo sobre los problemas del agua y las habilidades de liderazgo. Los criterios para ser aceptados incluyen tener compromiso para comprender los problemas del agua y un interés en buscar roles de liderazgo en las juntas y comisiones públicas, o puestos clave del personal donde labora. Los miembros de la clase deben asistir a una orientación especial en enero en la oficina de la Fundación en Sacramento, ir a mediados del año al tour de la Bahía-Delta Tour, y elegir otro tour relacionado con el agua, así como a la sesión informativa del Ejecutivo, y a la principal conferencia anual de la Fundación. A cada estudiante de la clase también se le asigna un mentor, legislador, científico o experto legal de alto nivel, con el que pasan un día "observando" lo que hace o le interesa al estudiante y luego realizan una entrevista personal sobre el tema de investigación durante la clase. El programa comenzó en 1997 y los egresados ​​de la clase han logrado alcanzar altos cargos en la Legislatura estatal, agencias gubernamentales, organizaciones sin fines de lucro y empresas privadas convirtiéndose en líderes comprometidos con los asuntos del agua.

Para obtener más información sobre el programa visite: http://www.watereducation.org/water-leaders. Aquí puede descargar el formulario de solicitud para completar en su computadora. Las solicitudes se reciben hasta el 5 de diciembre de 2017 y hay becas disponibles. Si tiene alguna pregunta póngase en contacto con Kasey Chong a: kchong@watereducation.org


No te pierdas de nuestra próxima llamada informativa de la Red: el jueves 26 de octubre, 4-5 p.m.

Las juntas informativas de la Red son conferencias telefónicas mensuales que brindan a los miembros de la Red la oportunidad de conectarse unos con otros, realizar preguntas y recibir información desde la comodidad de su casa. Como recordatorio, hemos cambiado de proveedor para el servicio de llamadas, lo que significa que tenemos un nuevo número de teléfono y una nueva clave para realizar la conferencia telefónica. Para participar, simplemente marque (929) 432-4463, cuando se le solicite el código de acceso marque 5254-59-7515 seguido de la tecla (#). Comuníquese con Adriana si necesita una tarjeta de prepago para llamar de larga distancia.

Agenda:

  1. Resumen y preguntas de los integrantes.
  2. Resumen y preguntas sobre el agua a nivel regional y estatal.
  3. Tema de discusión mensual: Planes de la Comunidad.

Financiamiento Disponible para la Planificación Sustentable de Aguas Subterráneas

El Departamento de Recursos Hídricos (DWR, por sus siglas en inglés) ha publicado la versión final del 2017 de los Proyectos y Planes de Sustentabilidad de Aguas Subterráneas (GSP, por sus siglas en inglés)  y el Paquete de Solicitudes de Propuestas (PSP, por sus siglas en inglés) para el Programa de becas para la Planificación Sostenible de Aguas Subterráneas (SGWP, por sus siglas en inglés), financiado a través de la Propuesta 1.

El Programa de Becas para la SGWP proporciona un total de $ 86.3 millones de fondos para proyectos que desarrollan e implementan la planificación sustentable de aguas subterráneas.

$ 10 millones de este financiamiento están reservados para proyectos que prestan servicios a comunidades severamente de bajos recursos, el resto del financiamiento respaldará la planificación, preparación o desarrollo de los Planes de Sustentabilidad de Aguas Subterráneas. Los proyectos deben abordar cuencas de alta y mediana prioridad o una porción no adjudicada de una de estas cuencas. La aplicación está disponible en línea a través del Sistema de Seguimiento y Revisión de Becas (GRANTS, por sus siglas en inglés). Consulte la lista de preguntas frecuentes del DWR. La fecha límite para solicitar la beca es el 13 de noviembre de 2017.


Información destacada del mes:

Este mes, el Departamento de Recursos Hídricos (DWR, por sus siglas en inglés) lanzó varias herramientas e información que los usuarios pueden usar para comprender mejor los datos relacionados con sus cuendas y las aguas subterráneas de su área. Verifique las herramientas y la información a continuación:

Solicitud Del Reporte Final Del Mapa De Pozos Del Departamento De Recursos Hídricos:

La Solicitud Del Reporte Final Del Mapa De Pozos proporciona acceso directo a nivel estatal a las copias de los informes finales sobre los pozos. Los informes finales de los pozos contienen información recopilada sobre la perforación y construcción de pozos de agua, incluida la ubicación, las fechas de construcción, el uso planificado, la profundidad del pozo, los datos geológicos de las sub superficies encontradas, la construcción del pozo y el rendimiento del pozo.

 

Resumen De Los Datos Sobre El Nivel Del Agua Subterránea Del Departamento De Recursos Hídricos:

El resumen de los datos sobre el nivel del agua subterránea presenta los datos preliminares sobre el nivel del agua subterránea durante la primavera del 2017 disponible en la base de datos del Departamento de Recursos Hídricos a partir del 11 de julio del 2017. La información, que ilustra los cambios durante la sequía del 2012-16, también incluye una discusión sobre la tendencia del nivel del agua subterránea y los datos que se obtuvieron durante la primavera de 2017. Los mapas estatales de cambio de nivel de agua subterránea durante la época de primavera también están disponibles en la página de Reportes y Mapas del Centro de Información de Aguas Subterráneas: http://www.water.ca.gov/groundwater/gwinfo/


Próximos talleres y capacitaciones:

El 24 de octubre de 9:00 a.m. a 10:00 p.m. Primera Parte: Auditorías Sobre El Control De Pérdida De Agua. Curso en línea gratis en: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4061056476497977602

El 24 de octubre de 11:00 a.m. a 12:00 p.m. Auditoría sobre el agua y control de pérdida de agua: recopilación e ingreso de datos. Curso en línea gratis en: http://efcnetwork.org/upcoming-events/

El 25 y 26 de octubre. Revisión de la certificación del tratamiento de agua en la Sede de capacitación de CRWA, 1234 North Market Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95834. Costo: $ 350. https://calruralwater.org/product/water-treatment-certification-review-grade-3/

El 25 de octubre a las 9:00 am. Reunión pública: Reunión del Comité Coordinador de la Calidad del Agua, en la oficina principal de CalEPA – Sala “Coastal Hearing”, Calle I núm. 1001, segundo piso,  Sacramento, CA 95814. Sin costo.  https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/board_info/calendar/index.html

El 26 de octubre de 8:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m. Operación y Mantenimiento de Distribución: Mantenimiento de la calidad del agua, en RCAC-Sal Solinas Room, 3120 Freeboard Dr. West Sacramento, CA 95691. Sin costo. https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1133

El 26 de octubre a las  08:30 a.m. Reunión pública: Reunión del Comité Coordinador de la Calidad del Agua en la oficina principal de CalEPA - Sala “Coastal Hearing”, Calle I núm. 1001, segundo piso Sacramento, CA 95815. Sin costo. https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/board_info/calendar/index.html

El 26 de octubre de 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. PPIC Water Policy Center presenta las prioridades de California con el tema del agua en la calle J núm. 1230, Sacramento, CA 95814. Sin costo. http://www.acwa.com/acwa_calendar

El 1º de noviembre a las 7:30 a.m. Tour de restauración del río San Joaquín en Fresno, CA. http://www.watereducation.org/calendar/2017-11

El 2 de noviembre a las 10 a.m. y 2 p.m. Revisión de la Regla Total de Coliformes (rTCR, por sus siglas en inglés). Curso en línea gratis en: https://www.events.rcac.org/rcac/Calendar.asp

El 7 de noviembre a las 10 a.m. La AB 1234: Ética para funcionarios públicos electos. Curso en línea gratis en: https://www.events.rcac.org/images/rcac/pdfs/SRFCA%20Brochure%202017%20July-Dec.pdf

El 7 de noviembre de las 11:00 a.m. a 12:00 p.m. ¿Por qué no estamos hablando de eso?: Agua potable y exposición al plomo. Curso en línea gratis en: https://ucanr.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0_YgleoRTj2ptNtJ0MmGNQ.

El 8 de noviembre de 8:30 a.m. a 4:30 p.m. La Gestión de recarga en las aguas subterráneas para apoyar la gestión sostenible del agua, en la calle J núm. 1400, Sacramento, CA 95814. http://www.watereducation.org/calendar/2017-11

El 9 de noviembre de 11:00 a.m. a 12:00 p.m. Planificación de la calidad del agua en las escuelas: pasos que las escuelas deben tomar. Curso en línea gratis en: https://ucanr.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_pipakClGTByoaf9uYQX5-g

El 14 de noviembre de 8:30 a.m. a 4:00 p.m. Feria CalTAP en Hampton Inn and Suites - 945 Hartle Court, Napa, CA. Sin costo. https://www.events.rcac.org/assnfe/ev.asp?ID=1157

15 de noviembre a las 09:30 a.m. Reunión de la Comisión del Agua de California en la calle 9ª núm. 1416, Sacramento, CA 95814. Sin costo. https://cwc.ca.gov/Pages/Home.aspx

El 15 de noviembre de las 11:00 a.m. a12:00 p.m. Soluciones: búsquelo y arréglelo, o enjuague o filtre. Curso en línea gratis en : https://ucanr.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L2tvsLo9QoSGT445dOx5Hw

 

Puede encontrar más información y eventos sobre los Líderes Comunitarios por el Agua en el siguiente calendario en línea: http://www.communitywatercenter.org/water_leaders_network.


¿Tiene alguna pregunta sobre este boletín informativo o de la Red de Líderes Comunitarios por el Agua?

Comuníquese con Adriana Rentería al 559-733-0219 o adriana.renteria@communitywatercenter.org

 


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